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Document 1804479
Chapter 5,
Mixed Review for TAKS
Volume (ft 3)
V
1600
45. D;
1200
The surface area is most useful for determining the
amount of paint the painter needs to buy.
800
46. H;
400
0
The graph is a parabola, so y 5 x2 is the parent function.
0
4
8
12
16
Radius (feet)
r
Lesson 5.9
The maximum volume is about 1600 cubic feet, it occurs
when r 5 8 ft and * 5 15.9 ft.
43. a.
5.9 Guided Practice (pp. 394–396)
1. f(x) 5 a(x 1 4)(x 2 2)(x 2 5)
10 5 a(0 1 4)(0 2 2)(0 2 5)
S
50,000
10 5 40a
Enrollment
40,000
1
4
}5a
30,000
1
f(x) 5 }4(x 1 4)(x 2 2)(x 2 5)
20,000
2. f(x) 5 a(x 1 1)(x 2 2)(x 2 3)
10,000
0
212 5 a(0 1 1)(0 2 2)(0 2 3)
0
8
212 5 6a
40 x
16
24
32
Years since 1960
22 5 a
f(x) 5 22(x 1 1)(x 2 2)(x 2 3)
b. The turning points are: (11.66, 44,970.9) and
(29.8, 40,078.2)
3. f (1)
The number of students enrolled increased steadily
before 1971 and decreased steadily between 1972
and 1990. After 1990 the number of students enrolled
increased steadily again.
f (2)
5
1
4
c. range: 36,300 a S a 47,978
1 2
r 1 }2h 5 82
1 2
1
h
2
Ï
10
3
f (5)
35
13
3
f (6)
51
16
3
f (7)
70
19
3
h
4. f (1)
f (2)
15
6
f (3)
22
f(4)
21
f (5) f (6)
6 229
r
}
r5
f(4)
22
Each second order difference is 3, so the second-order
differences are constant.
8
h2
r 2 5 64 2 }
4
7
3
44. Write r as a function of h:
2
f (3)
12
h2
64 2 }
4
9
1 Î64 2 }h4 2
28
22
Volume of a cylinder 5 :r2h
21
7
215 235
214
220
1st order differences
2nd order differences
}
5:
2 2
1
h2
+h
2
26
26
26
+h
5 : 64 2 }
4
Cubic function:
:h3
5 64:h 2 }
4
a(1)3 1 b(1)2 1 c(1) 1 d 5 6
3rd order differences
f(x) 5 ax3 1 bx2 1 cx 1 d
a1b1c1d56
a(2)3 1 b(2)2 1 c(2) 1 d 5 15
8a 1 4b 1 2c 1 d 5 15
a(3)3 1 b(3)2 1 c(3) 1 d 5 22
Maximum
X=9.2376049 Y=1238.2204
From the graph, you can see that h ø 9.2 maximizes
the volume. The maximum volume is about
1238 cubic units.
306
Algebra 2
Worked-Out Solution Key
27a 1 9b 1 3c 1 d 5 22
a(4)3 1 b(4)2 1 c(4) 1 d 5 21
64a 1 16b 1 4c 1 d 5 21
Copyright © by McDougal Littell, a division of Houghton Mifflin Company.
c.
continued
Chapter 5,
continued
F GF G F G
1
1
1 1
a
6
8
4
2
1
b
15
27
9
3
1
c
64 16 4
1
d
21
X 5
B
A
5
5. f(x) 5 a(x 1 3)(x 2 1)(x 2 4)
2 5 a(0 1 3)(0 2 1)(0 2 4)
2 5 12a
22
X 5 A21B
1
6
}5a
1
f(x) 5 }6(x 1 3)(x 2 1)(x 2 4)
6. f(x) 5 a(x 1 3)(x)(x 2 4)
Using a graphing calculator, the solution is
a 5 21, b 5 5, c 5 1, and d 5 1. So, a polynomial
model is f (x) 5 2x 3 1 5x 2 1 x 1 1.
5. Regression model:
y 5 2.7130x 2 25.468x 1 71.82x 2 45.7
3
2
10 5 a(21 1 3)(21)(21 2 4)
10 5 10a
a51
f(x) 5 x(x 1 3)(x 2 4)
7. f(x) 5 a(x 1 2)(x 1 1)(x 2 2)
28 5 a(0 1 2)(0 1 1)(0 2 2)
28 5 24a
25a
f(x) 5 2(x 1 2)(x 1 1)(x 2 2)
8. f(x) 5 a(x 1 3)(x 2 1)(x 2 4)
2 5 a(3 1 3)(3 2 1)(3 2 4)
6. Regression model:
y 5 20.5868x3 1 8.985x2 2 23.37x 1 9.6
2 5 212a
1
2}6 5 a
1
f(x) 5 2}6(x 1 3)(x 2 1)(x 2 4)
9. f(x) 5 a(x 1 5)(x)(x 2 6)
Copyright © by McDougal Littell, a division of Houghton Mifflin Company.
212 5 a(1 1 5)(1)(1 2 6)
5.9 Exercises (pp. 397–399)
212 5 230a
2
5
}5a
Skill Practice
1. When the x-values in a data set are equally spaced, the
differences of consecutive y-values are called finite
differences.
2
f(x) 5 }5x(x 1 5)(x 2 6)
10. B; f (x) 5 a(x 1 3)(x 1 1)(x 2 3)
3 5 a(0 1 3)(0 1 1)(0 2 3)
2. First-order differences are differences between
consecutive y-values of a function when the x-values are
equally spaced. Second-order differences are differences
between consecutive first-order differences.
3 5 29a
1
2}3 5 a
3. f(x) 5 a(x 1 1)(x 2 2)(x 2 3)
3 5 a(0 1 1)(0 2 2)(0 2 3)
3 5 6a
1
}5a
2
1
f (x) 5 }2 (x 1 1)(x 2 2)(x 2 3)
4. f(x) 5 a(x 1 4)(x 1 1)(x 2 1)
4
3
1
f(x) 5 2}3(x 1 3)(x 1 1)(x 2 3)
11. The student replaced x with 3 instead of 1 and replaced
y with 1 instead of 3.
3 5 a(1 1 1)(1 2 2)(1 2 5)
3 5 8a
3
8
}5a
} 5 a(0 1 4)(0 1 1)(0 2 1)
4
3
1
2}3 5 a
} 5 24a
1
f(x) 5 2}3(x 1 4)(x 1 1)(x 2 1)
Algebra 2
Worked-Out Solution Key
307
Chapter 5,
12. f(1)
f(2)
30
25
35
f (3)
125
95
60
continued
f (4)
310
185
90
f(5)
615
305
120
30
30
f (6) f(7)
1070 1705
455
150
30
17. f (1)
f (2)
54
0
54
635
f (3)
462
408
354
180
1134
Each third-order difference is 30, so the third-order
differences are nonzero and constant.
13. f(1)
f(2)
2
3
21
25
29
213
217
24
24
f(2)
6
f (3)
56
f (4)
210
24
f (5)
552
5094
2460
960
240
9270 18,024
8754
3660
1200
240
Each fifth-order difference is 240, so the fifth-order
differences are nonzero and constant.
221
f (2)
23
0
Each second-order difference is 24, so the second-order
differences are nonzero and constant.
0
2634
720
18. f (1)
24
f (5)
f(6)
f(7)
6180 15,450 33,474
4176
1500
f (3) f (4) f (5) f(6) f (7)
23 212 225 242 263
24
14. f(1)
1542
780
30
f(4)
2004
23
f (6) f (7)
1190 2256
f (3) f(4) f (5) f(6)
28 215 224 235
25
27
22
22
29
22
211
22
1st order differences
2nd order differences
Quadratic function:
6
50
44
154
104
60
342
188
84
638
296
108
1066
f (n) 5 an2 1 bn 1 c
a(1)2 1 b(1) 1 c 5 0 la 1 b 1 c 5 0
428
a(2)2 1 b(2) 1 c 5 23 l4a 1 2b 1 c 5 23
a(3)2 1 b(3) 1 c 5 28 l9a 1 3b 1 c 5 28
132
a 1 b 1 c 5 0 lc 5 2a 2 b
24
4a 1 2b 1 c 5 23
24
Each fourth-order difference is 24, so the fourth-order
differences are nonzero and constant.
15. f(1)
f (2)
0
23
3
f (3)
11
11
f (4)
30
19
f(5)
57
27
f(6)
92
35
f(7)
135
9a 1 3b 1 c 5 28
4a 1 2b 1 (2a 2 b) 5 23
3a 1 b 5 23
9a 1 3b 1 (2a 2 b) 5 28
8a 1 2b 5 28
43
3a 1 b 5 23 lb 5 23 2 3a
8
8
8
8
8a 1 2b 5 28
8
Each second-order difference is 8, so the second-order
differences are nonzero and constant.
16. f(1)
23
f(2) f (3)
29 211
26
22
f (4)
23
8
f (5)
21
24
f (6)
67
46
f(7)
141
74
8a 1 2(23 2 3a) 5 28
8a 2 6 2 6a 5 28 la 5 21
b 5 23 2 3(21) 5 0
c 5 2(21) 2 0 5 1
The quadratic function is f (n) 5 2n2 1 1.
19. f (1)
4
10
6
16
6
22
6
28
6
Each third-order difference is 6, so the third-order
differences are nonzero and constant.
308
Algebra 2
Worked-Out Solution Key
f (2)
14
11
25
3
28
f (3)
9
f(4) f (5) f(6)
24 225 254
213
28
221
28
229
28
1st order differences
2nd order differences
Copyright © by McDougal Littell, a division of Houghton Mifflin Company.
24
Chapter 5,
continued
Quadratic function: f (n) 5 an2 1 bn 1 c.
a(1)2 1 b(1) 1 c 5 11 la 1 b 1 c 5 11
21. f (1)
f (2)
14
5
a(2)2 1 b(2) 1 c 5 14 l4a 1 2b 1 c 5 14
13
9
a(3)3 1 b(3) 1 c 5 9 l9a 1 3b 1 c 5 9
a 1 b 1 c 511 lc 5 11 2 a 2 b
f (3)
27
f(4)
41
14
f (6)
60
12
22
1
4
f (5)
53
7
25
1st order differences
2nd order differences
4a 1 2b 1 c 5 14
23
9a 1 3b 1 c 5 9
a(1)3 1 b(1)2 1 c(1) 1 d 5 5
a1b1c1d55
9a 1 3b 1 (11 2 a 2 b) 5 9
a(2) 1 b(2)2 1 c(2) 1 d 5 14
3
8a 1 2b 5 22
8a 1 4b 1 2c 1 d 5 14
3a 1 b 5 3 lb 5 3 2 3a
a(3) 1 b(3)2 1 c(3) 1 d 5 27
3
8a 1 2b 5 22
27a 1 9b 1 3c 1 d 5 27
8a 1 2(3 2 3a) 5 22
a(4) 1 b(4)2 1 c(4) 1 d 5 41
3
8a 1 6 2 6a 5 22 la 5 24
c 5 11 2 (24) 2 15 5 0
The quadratic function is f (n) 5 24n 1 15n.
2
f (5)
40
F GF G F G
64a 1 16b 1 4c 1 d 5 41
b 5 3 2 3(24) 5 15
f (4)
6
f (6)
98
1
1
1
1
a
5
8
4
2
1
b
14
27
9
3 1
c
4
d
64 16
1
A
22
4
16
3rd order differences
Cubic function: f(x) 5 ax 1 bx2 1 cx 1 d
3a 1 b 5 3
f(2) f (3)
212 214 210
23
3
4a 1 2b 1 (11 2 a 2 b) 5 14
20. f (1)
23
34
1st order differences
58
5
27
41
X
5
X
5 A21B
B
1
12
6
18
24
2nd order differences
Using a graphing calculator, the solution is a 5 2}2 ,
5
Copyright © by McDougal Littell, a division of Houghton Mifflin Company.
6
6
3rd order differences
6
Cubic function: f(x) 5 ax 1 bx2 1 cx 1 d
3
a(1)3 1 b(1)2 1 c(1) 1 d 5 212
b 5 5, c 5 2}2 , and d 5 3. So, a polynomial model is
1
5
f(x) 5 2}2x3 1 5x2 2 }2x 1 3.
22. Sample answers:
a 1 b 1 c 1 d 5 212
f(x) 5 a(x 1 1)(x 1 3)(x)
a(2)3 1 b(2)2 1 c(2) 1 d 5 214
6 5 a(2 1 1)(2 1 3)(2)
8a 1 4b 1 2c 1 d 5 214
a(3)3 1 b(3)2 1 c(3) 1 d 5 210
27a 1 9b 1 3c 1 d 5 210
64a 1 16b 1 4c 1 d 5 6
F GF G F G
1
1
1
1
a
212
8
4
2
1
b
27
9
3 1
c
5 214
210
4
d
6
A
1
X
X
5
1
5
}5a
1
f(x) 5 }5(x)(x 1 1)(x 1 3)
a(4)3 1 a(4)2 1 a(4) 1 d 5 6
64 16
6 5 30a
B
21
5 A B
Using a graphing calculator, the solution is a 5 1,
b 5 23, c 5 0, and d 5 210. So, a polynomial function
is f (x) 5 x3 2 3x2 2 10.
f (x) 5 a(x 1 1)(x 1 3)(x 2 1)
6 5 a(2 1 1)(2 1 3)(2 2 1)
6 5 15a
2
5
}5a
2
f(x) 5 }5(x 1 1)(x 1 3)(x 2 1)
23. For a function of degree 4, it takes 5 points to determine
a quartic function.
For a function of degree 5, it takes 6 points to determine
a quintic function.
Algebra 2
Worked-Out Solution Key
309
continued
To determine a quartic function
f(x) 5 a4x 4 1 a3x 31 a2x 21 a1x1 a0, a system of 5
equations in 5 variables
F
GF G F G
Second Differences
6a
x13
x12
x1
1
a4
f(x1)
bak 1 12a 1 2b
6a
x2
4
x2
3
2
x2
1
a3
f(x2)
bak 1 18a 1 2b
6a
x3
4
x33
x32
x3
1
a2 5
f(x3)
x4 4
x43
x42
x4
1
a1
f(x4)
x54
x53
x52
x5
1
a0
f(x5)
x2
bak 1 24a 1 2b
25. d(3)
d(4)
2
0
2
To determine a quintic function
f (x) 5 a5x 5 1 a4x 4 1 a3x 31 a2x 2 1 a1x1 a0, a system
of 6 equations in 6 variables (ai , i 5 0, 1, 2, . . . , 5)
should be solved.
24.
bak 1 6a 1 2b
x14
should be solved to find a0, a1, a2, a3, and a4, where each
(xi , f (xi )), i 5 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 is a point.
F
Third Differences
GF G F G
d(5)
5
3
d(6)
9
4
1
1
d(7)
14
5
1
d(8)
20
1st order differences
6
1
2nd order differences
Quadratic function: d(n) 5 an 1 bn 1 c
2
a(3)2 1 b(3) 1 c 5 0 l9a 1 3b 1 c 5 0
x15
x14
x13
x12
x1
1
a5
f(x1)
a(4)2 1 b(4) 1 c 5 2 l16a 1 4b 1 c 5 2
x 25
x 24
x 23
x 22
x2
1
a4
f(x2)
a(5)2 1 b(5) 1 c 5 5 l25a 1 5b 1 c 5 5
x35
x 34
x33
x32
x3
1
a3
x45
x4 4
x43
x42
x4
1
a2
x55
x54
x53
x52
x5
1
a1
f(x5)
16a 1 4b 1 (29a 2 3b) 5 2
x65
x6 4
x63
x62
x6
1
a0
f(x6)
7a 1 b 5 2 lb 5 2 2 7a
f (k) 5 ak3 1 bk2 1 ck 1 d
5
9a 1 3b 1 c 5 0 lc 5 29a 2 3b
f(x3)
16a 1 4b 1 c 5 2
f(x4)
25a 1 5b 1 c 5 5
25a 1 5b 1 (29a 2 3b) 5 5
16a 1 2b 5 5
f (k 1 1) 5 a(k 1 1)3 1 b(k 1 1)2 1 c(k 1 1) 1 d
1
16a 1 2(2 2 7a) 5 5 la 5 }2
5 ak3 1 (3a 1 b)k2 1 (3a 1 2b 1 c)k
1a1b1c1d
b 5 2 2 71 }2 2 5 2}2
1
f (k 1 2) 5 a(k 1 2)3 1 b(k 1 2)2 1 c(k 1 2) 1 d
5 ak3 1 (6a 1 b)k2 1 (12a 1 4b 1 c)k
c 5 291 }2 2 2 31 2}2 2 5 0
1
1 8a 1 4b 1 2c 1 d
1
3
be modeled by d(n) 5 }2 n2 2 }2 n .
5 ak3 1 (9a 1 b)k2 1 (27a 1 6b 1 c)k
f (k 1 4) 5 a(k 1 4)3 1 b(k 1 4)2 1 c(k 1 4) 1 d
3
The number of diagonals of a polygon with n sides can
f (k 1 3) 5 a(k 1 3)3 1 b(k 1 3)2 1 c(k 1 3) 1 d
1 27a 1 9b 1 3c 1 d
3
26.
5 ak3 1 (12a 1 b)k2 1 (48a 1 8b)k
1 64a 1 16b 1 4c 1 d
f (k 1 5) 5 a(k 1 5)3 1 b(k 1 5)2 1 c(k 1 4) 1 d
5 ak3 1 (15a 1 b)k2 1 (75a 1 10b)k
1 125a 1 25b 1 5c 1 d
First Differences
f (k) l3ak2 1 (3a 1 2b)k 1 a 1 b 1 c
f (k 1 1) l3ak2 1 (9a 1 2b)k 1 7a 1 3b 1 c
f (k 1 2) l3ak2 1 (15a 1 2b)k 1 19a 1 5b 1 c
f (k 1 3) l3ak 1 (21a 1 2b)k 1 37a 1 7b 1 c
f (k 1 4) l3ak2 1 (27a 1 2b)k 1 61a 1 9b 1 c
f (k 1 5)
310
Algebra 2
Worked-Out Solution Key
A polynomial model is
p(t) 5 20.013t 3 2 0.30t 2 1 4.7t 1 131.
Copyright © by McDougal Littell, a division of Houghton Mifflin Company.
Chapter 5,
Chapter 5,
continued
27. a. A polynomial model is
30. p(1)
m(t) 5 0.000817t 3 2 0.0215t 2 1 0.249t 1 3.17.
p(2)
4
2
b.
p(3)
8
4
2
7
3
2
X=27
p(4)
15
1
Y=10.26209
p(5)
26
11
4
1
p(6)
42
1st order differences
16
5
2nd order differences
3rd order differences
1
Cubic function: p(x) 5 ax 1 bx2 1 cx 1 d
3
In 2010, the average U.S. movie ticket price will be
about $10.30.
c.
a(1)3 1 b(1)2 1 c(1) 1 d 5 2 l
a1b1c1d52
a(2)3 1 b(2)2 1 c(2) 1 d 5 4 l
8a 1 4b 1 2c 1 d 5 4
a(3)3 1 b(3)2 1 c(3) 1 d 5 8 l
n
o
i
t
c
e
s
r
e
t
n
I
X=12.4
103
59
27a 1 9b 1 3c 1 d 5 8
Y=4
.5
a(4) 1 b(4) 1 c(4) 1 d 5 15 l
3
The average U.S. movie ticket price was $4.50 in 1995.
28. Yard work:
2
F GF G F G
64a 1 16b 1 4c 1 d 5 15
1
1
1
1
a
8
4
2
1
b
27
9
3 1
c
4
d
64 16
1
Copyright © by McDougal Littell, a division of Houghton Mifflin Company.
A
2
4
5
8
15
X
5
X
5 A21B
B
A polynomial function for the profit for the yard work is
p(t) 5 8.333t 3 2 40t 2 1 241.7t 2 180.
Using a graphing calculator, the solution is a 5 }6,
Pet care:
b 5 0, c 5 }6, and d 5 1. So, a polynomial model for the
1
5
1
5
maximum number of pieces is p(c) 5 }6c3 1 }6 c 1 1.
5
1
When c 5 8, p(c) 5 }6 (8)3 1 }6 (8) 1 1 5 93 pieces.
Mixed Review for TAKS
31. B;
A polynomial function for the profit for the pet care is
p(t) 5 75t 2 2 205t 1 160. The yard work business will
achieve the greatest long-term profit. The cubic model
for the yard work will increase more rapidly than the
quadratic model for the pet care.
y
2x 2 y 5 10
2
2
(4, 22)
23x 2 2y 5 28
29. R(1) R(2) R(3) R(4) R(5) R(6) R(7)
2
4
2
8
4
2
16
8
4
30
14
6
52
22
8
x
84
32
10
The solution is (4, 22).
32. F;
h 5 216t 2 1 90
2
2
2
2
Each third-order difference is 2, so the third-order
differences are constant.
9 5 216t 2 1 90
16t 2 5 81
t 2 5 5.0625
}
t 5 6Ï 5.0625
t 5 62.25
The stuntman will hit the cushion in about 2.25 seconds.
Algebra 2
Worked-Out Solution Key
311
Chapter 5,
continued
}
}
1. f (x) 5 x3 2 4x2 2 11x 1 30
1
1
24
211
30
}
2
24
230
22
215
0
5 (x 1 3)(x 2 5)[(x 2 7)2 2 (Ï2 )2]
5 (x 1 3)(x 2 5)(x2 2 14x 1 49 2 2)
5 (x2 2 2x 2 15)(x2 2 14x 1 47)
5 x4 2 14x3 1 47x2 2 2x3 1 28x2 2 94x 2 15x2
1 210x 2 705
5 x4 2 16x3 1 60x2 1 116x 2 705
f (x) 5 (x 2 2)(x2 2 2x 2 15) 5 (x 2 2)(x 2 5)(x 1 3)
}
[x 2 (3 1 Ï6 )]
}
}
5 (x 2 1)[x2 2 (2i)2][(x 2 3) 1 Ï 6 ][(x 2 3) 2 Ï6 ]
}
5 (x 2 1)(x2 1 4)[(x 2 3)2 2 (Ï6 )2]
5 (x3 1 4x 2 x2 2 4)(x2 2 6x 1 9 2 6)
5 (x3 2 x2 1 4x 2 4)(x2 2 6x 1 3)
2. f (x) 5 2x4 2 2x3 2 49x2 1 9x 1 180
Possible rational zeros: 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 69,
610, 612, 615, 618, 620,
630, 636, 645, 660, 690,
6180
24 2
22 249
9
180
28
40
36
2180
210
29
45
0
f (x) 5 (x 1 4)(2x3 2 10x2 2 9x 1 45)
5
2
2
210
29
45
10
0
245
0
5 x5 2 x4 1 4x3 2 4x2 2 6x4 1 6x3 2 24x 2
1 24x 1 3x3 2 3x2 1 12x 2 12
5 x5 2 7x4 1 13x3 2 31x2 1 36x 2 12
7. f (x) 5 2(x 2 3)(x 2 2)(x 1 2)
x
22.5
21
y
12.4
212
0
1
212 26
2.5
4
1.1
212
y
2
(22, 0)
(2, 0)
(3, 0)
21
29
}
6. f(x) 5 (x 2 1)(x 2 2i)(x 1 2i)[x 2 (3 2 Ï 6 )] +
The zeros are 23, 2, and 5.
2
}
5 (x 1 3)(x 2 5)[(x 2 7) 2 Ï2 ][(x 2 7) 1 Ï2 ]
Possible rational zeros: 61, 62, 63, 65, 66, 610, 615,
630
2
}
5. f(x) 5 (x 1 3)(x 2 5)[x 2 (7 1 Ï 2 )][x 2 (7 2 Ï 2 )]
Quiz 5.7–5.9 (p. 399)
x
0
0 5 (x 1 4)(x 2 5)(2x2 2 9)
x1450
or x 2 5 5 0
or
}
2x2 2 9 5 0
3Ï2
}
3Ï2
x 5 24 or x 5 5 or x 5 2}
or x 5 }
2
2
}
}
3Ï2 3Ï3
,}
, and 5.
The zeros are 24, 2}
2
2
8. f (x) 5 3(x 2 1)(x 1 1)(x 2 4)
x
21.5
0
2
3
4.5
y
220.6
12
218
224
28.9
(1, 0)
(4, 0)
3. f (x) 5 (x 1 4)(x 1 1)(x 2 2)
y
5 (x2 1 5x 1 4)(x 2 2)
5 x3 1 5x2 1 4x 2 2x2 2 10x 2 8
(21, 0)
5 x3 1 3x2 2 6x 2 8
5
22
4. f (x) 5 (x 2 4)[x 2 (1 1 i)][x 2 (1 2 i)]
x
5 (x 2 4)[(x 2 1) 2 i][(x 2 1) 1 i]
5 (x 2 4)[(x 2 1)2 2 i2]
5 (x 2 4)(x2 2 2x 1 1 1 1)
5 (x 2 4)(x2 2 2x 1 2)
x
22.5
21
2
3
4.5
5 x 2 6x 1 10x 2 8
y
28.4
210
216
230
51.2
3
312
9. f (x) 5 x(x 2 4)(x 2 1)(x 1 2)
5 x 2 2x 1 2x 2 4x 1 8x 2 8
3
2
2
Algebra 2
Worked-Out Solution Key
2
Copyright © by McDougal Littell, a division of Houghton Mifflin Company.
f (x) 5 (x 1 4)(x 2 5)(2x2 2 9)
Chapter 5,
continued
2. G;
y
5
(1, 0)
V 5 *wh
(4, 0)
21
x
180 5 (x 1 5)(x 1 1)x
180 5 x3 1 6x2 1 5x
(22, 0)
0 5 x3 1 6x2 1 5x 2 180
(0, 0)
0 5 (x 2 4)(x2 1 10x 1 45)
The only real root is x 5 4 because b2 2 4ac < 0, so the
prism is 4 inches tall.
10. f (x) 5 (x 2 3)(x 1 2)2(x 1 3)2
x
24
21
y
228
216 2108 2288 2400
0
1
2
3.25
269
3. A;
V 5 *wh
5 (30 2 2x)(20 2 2x)x
5 (600 2 100x 1 4x 2)x
y
(22, 0)
50
(23, 0)
(3, 0)
22
5 4x 3 2 100x 2 1 600x
x
Using a graphing calculator, the maximum occurs when
x ø 3.9. So the cuts should be about 3.9 inches long.
4. F;
The coefficients of f (x) have 1 sign change, so there is
1 positive real zero.
11. f (x) 5 a(x 1 5)(x 1 2)(x 2 2)
Use (1, 9): 9 5 a(1 1 5)(1 1 2)(1 2 2)
1
2}2 5 a
1
f (x) 5 2}2(x 1 5)(x 1 2)(x 2 2)
12. f (x) 5 a(x 1 1)(x 2 2)(x 2 4)
Copyright © by McDougal Littell, a division of Houghton Mifflin Company.
Use (0, 16): 16 5 a(0 1 1)(0 2 2)(0 2 4)
25a
f (x) 5 2(x 1 1)(x 2 2)(x 2 4)
5. C;
1
V 5 }3Bh
1
200 5 }3 x2(x 2 4)
1
4
200 5 }3x3 2 }3x2
600 5 x 3 2 4x 2
0 5 x3 2 4x 2 2 600
10 1 24
0
13.
1
2600
10
60
600
6
60
0
0 5 (x 2 10)(x 1 6x 1 60)
2
A polynomial model is
D(t) 5 0.99x3 2 10.5t 2 2 5t 1 847.
Mixed Review for TEKS (p. 400)
1. B; By the Complex Conjugates Theorem, 4 1 i is also a
zero of the function.
The only positive real solution is x 5 10 because
b2 2 4ac < 0, so the length of a side of the base
is 10 inches.
6. H;
R 5 0.0014t3 2 0.0305t2 1 0.232t 1 3.19
3.86 5 0.0014t 3 2 0.0305t 2 1 0.232t 1 3.19
0 5 0.0014t 3 2 0.0305t 2 1 0.232t 2 0.67
f (x) 5 (x 1 2)(x 2 1)[x 2 (4 2 i)][x 2 (4 1 i)]
5 (x 2 1 x 2 2)[(x 2 4) 1 i][(x 2 4) 2 i]
5 (x 2 1 x 2 2)[(x 2 4)2 2 i 2]
5 (x 2 1 x 2 2)(x2 2 8x 1 16 1 1)
5 (x2 1 x 2 2)(x 2 2 8x 1 17)
5 x 4 2 8x3 1 17x 2 1 x 3 2 8x 2 1 17x 2 2x 2 1 16x
2 34
Zero
X=10
Y=0
The revenue was $3.86 million in 1995.
5 x 4 2 7x 3 1 7x 2 1 33x 2 34
Algebra 2
Worked-Out Solution Key
313
Chapter 5,
7. p(1)
4
p(2)
2
p(3)
6
p(4)
22
continued
8. (3x4y22)23 5 (3)23(x4)23( y22)23
p(5)
56
Power of a product property
4
16
34
1st order differences
Power of a power property
y6
6
12
18
6
6
2nd order differences
5}
3 12
Negative exponent property
3rd order differences
5}
12
Simplify and evaluate power.
Cubic function: p(t) 5 at 3 1 bt 2 1 ct 1 d
Use (1, 4): a(1) 1 b(1) 1 c(1) 1 d 5 4
3
2
3x
y6
27x
322
3 22
9. }
5}
4
422
1 2
42
3
a1b1c1d54
5 }2
Use (2, 2): a(2)3 1 b(2)2 1 c(2) 1 d 5 2
Use (3, 6): a(3) 1 b(3) 1 c(3) 1 d 5 6
2
27a 1 9b 1 3c 1 d 5 6
16
F
64a 1 16b 1 4c 1 d 5 22
GF G F G
X
1
1
1
1
8
4
2
1
27
9
3
1
64 16
4
1
B
4
a
b
5
6
d
22
X 5 A21B
Using a graphing calculator, the solution is a 5 1,
b 5 23, c 5 0, and d 5 6. So, the profit can be modeled
by p(t) 5 t 3 2 3t 2 1 6.
2. A solution of a polynomial equation is repeated if a
factor is raised to a power greater then 1 or the factor
is repeated.
Simplify and evaluate power.
1
xy
Negative exponent property
26 5
2x y
1
12. }
5 }8 x26 2 3y5 2 (22)
16x3y22
Quotient of powers property
1
5 }8x29y7
Simplify exponents.
y7
5 }9
Negative exponent property
8x
13. f(x) 5 2x4
x
22
21
0
1
2
f (x)
216
21
0
21
216
y
2
22
4. The function f has 4 2 1 5 3 turning points.
52
Power of a power property
5}
8 8
c 3 10n where 1a c <10 and n is an integer.
7
x
y
5}
8
3. A number is in scientific notation if it is in the form
5. 22 + 25 5 22 1 5
Power of quotient property
28
Chapter 5 Review (pp. 402–406)
function has a local maximum or a local minimum.
Quotient of powers property
5 4 3 104
1 2
When t 5 7, p(t) 5 (7)3 2 3(7)2 1 6 5 $202.
1. At each of its turning points, the graph of a polynomial
5 4 3 107 2 3
(x2)24
x2 24
11. }
5}
22
y
( y22)24
2
c
Simplify and evaluate powers.
8
8 3 107
107
10. }3 5 } 3 }3
2
2 3 10
10
Use (4, 22): a(4)3 1 b(4)2 1 c(4) 1 d 5 22
A
Negative exponent property
5}
9
8a 1 4b 1 2c 1 d 5 2
3
Power of a quotient property
x
Product of powers property
Simplify and evaluate power.
5 128
6. (32)23(33) 5 32633
5 3 2613
23
53
1
3
5 }3
1
5}
27
7. (x22y5)2 5 (x22)2( y 5)2
24 10
5x y
y10
5}
4
x
314
Algebra 2
Worked-Out Solution Key
Power of a power property
Product of powers property
Simplify exponent.
Negative exponent property
Simplify and evaluate power.
Power of a product property
Power of a power property
Negative exponent property
14. f(x) 5 x3 2 4
x
22
21
0
1
2
f (x)
212
25
24
23
4
Copyright © by McDougal Littell, a division of Houghton Mifflin Company.
22
5 323x212y6
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