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Subsection 2.4.11 Table of Contents Section Title Page
Victoria County Station
ESP Application
Part 2 — Site Safety Analysis Report
Subsection 2.4.11 Table of Contents
Section
Title
Page
2.4.11 Low Water Considerations ............................................................................ 2.4.11-1
2.4.11.1 Low Flow in Rivers and Streams ........................................................ 2.4.11-2
2.4.11.2 Low Water Resulting from Surges, Seiches, or Tsunamis ................. 2.4.11-4
2.4.11.3 Historical Low Water .......................................................................... 2.4.11-4
2.4.11.4 Future Controls .................................................................................. 2.4.11-5
2.4.11.5 Plant Requirements ............................................................................ 2.4.11-5
2.4.11.6 Heat Sink Dependability Requirements .............................................. 2.4.11-6
2.4.11.7 References ......................................................................................... 2.4.11-6
2.4.11-i
Revision 1
Victoria County Station
ESP Application
Part 2 — Site Safety Analysis Report
Subsection 2.4.11 List of Tables
Number
Title
2.4.11-1
Guadalupe River Annual Minimum 7-Day Flows
2.4.11-2
Guadalupe River Annual Minimum 30-Day Flows
2.4.11-3
Guadalupe River Annual Minimum 60-Day Low Flows
2.4.11-4
Estimated 100-Year Frequency Low Flows for Guadalupe River Near
Tivoli, Texas
2.4.11-5
Total Annual Rainfall of Victoria vs. Annual Minimum Low Flows of The
Guadalupe River at Tivoli
2.4.11-ii
Revision 1
Victoria County Station
ESP Application
Part 2 — Site Safety Analysis Report
Number
2.4.11-1
Subsection 2.4.11 List of Figures
Title
Historic Minimum Low Flows for Guadalupe River near Tivoli, Texas
2.4.11-iii
Revision 1
Victoria County Station
ESP Application
Part 2 — Site Safety Analysis Report
2.4.11 Low Water Considerations
The cooling system design for VCS separates the normal cooling and the emergency cooling
systems. Depending on the reactor technology, emergency cooling (safety-related) for VCS is
provided by an ultimate heat sink (UHS) consisting of mechanical draft cooling towers and
associated water storage basin. Normal plant cooling (nonsafety-related) is provided by the
circulating water system using the cooling basin and service water system(s) employing mechanical
draft cooling towers for heat dissipation.
Nonsafety-related cooling water is withdrawn from the cooling basin via a circulating water pump
intake structure, and heated water is returned to the cooling basin via a circulating water discharge
structure. The cooling basin itself functions to transfer heat from the circulating water to the
atmosphere. The cooling basin and cooling basin intake and discharge structures are not
safety-related.
The raw water makeup (RWMU) system provides makeup water to the cooling basin to compensate
for evaporation, seepage, and blowdown losses and water losses from UHS/service water
mechanical draft cooling towers (for the applicable reactor technology). The RWMU system is
nonsafety-related. The Guadalupe River is the source of the makeup water to the cooling basin. The
river water is diverted to the RWMU intake canal immediately upstream of the Lower Guadalupe
Saltwater Barrier and Diversion Dam (Figure 2.4.1-10). Makeup water is pumped into the cooling
basin, as needed, via the RWMU system intake structure located at the end of the intake canal.
Subsection 2.4.1 provides a description of the RWMU system.
The Saltwater Barrier and Diversion Dam on the Guadalupe River is located near Tivoli, Texas
downstream of the confluence of the Guadalupe River and San Antonio River. The Saltwater Barrier
and Diversion Dam prevents intrusion of downstream brackish water into the upstream fresh water
during river low flow periods and creates necessary head on the river for water diversion to the intake
canal. Figures 2.4.1-1 and 2.4.1-10 show the location of VCS with respect to the RWMU intake canal
system and Saltwater Barrier and Diversion Dam, respectively.
The design water level of the cooling basin is elevation 90.5 feet (27.6 meters) NAVD 88. The cooling
basin storage capacity at this elevation is 103,600 acre-feet. The normal maximum operating level of
the cooling basin is elevation 91.5 feet (27.9 meters) NAVD 88, which includes an operating range of
1 foot. The storage volume of the cooling basin is about 108,500 acre-feet when the basin water level
reaches the normal maximum operating level. Makeup water to the cooling basin is supplied from the
Guadalupe River and is pumped into the cooling basin via the RWMU facility. The only natural inflow
into the cooling basin is direct rainfall, as the cooling basin has no drainage area other than the
reservoir surface. The water level of 73.5 feet (22.4 meters) NAVD 88 allows the operation of the
plant under full load condition with an intake water temperature of less than 100°F. At this level, the
2.4.11-1
Revision 1
Victoria County Station
ESP Application
Part 2 — Site Safety Analysis Report
volume of water remaining in the cooling basin is approximately 21,700 acre-feet. Evaluations of the
cooling basin’s inventory and thermal performance are described in detail in Subsection 2.4.8.
The live storage capacity of the cooling basin between the design pool level and 73.5 feet (22.4
meters) NAVD 88 is adequate to sustain continuous operation of the plant during extended periods of
drought in the Guadalupe River with reduced and infrequent makeup water flow to the cooling basin.
The design capacity of the RWMU system is about 267 cubic feet per second (cfs) (120,000 gpm).
The RWMU system can supply up to 217 cfs (97,400 gpm) to the VCS cooling basin and an
additional 50 cfs (22,400 gpm) of pumping capacity is available for use by another entity or entities in
the future. As described in Subsection 2.4.8, the evaluation of the cooling basin storage capacity is
based on a maximum annual diversion rate for makeup to the VCS cooling basin of 75,000 acre-feet,
subject to run-of-river availability.
2.4.11.1
Low Flow in Rivers and Streams
The safety-related cooling functions for VCS, including the UHS, do not rely upon river or stream flow
rates or water levels. The low flow characteristics of the rivers that supply makeup water to the
nonsafety-related cooling systems are described below.
The major rivers near the VCS site are the Guadalupe River and the San Antonio River. The
Guadalupe River, upstream of its confluence with the San Antonio River, passes on the eastern
boundary of the site. The Guadalupe River watershed extends from the south central portion of Texas
in Kerr County to its mouth in the San Antonio Bay at the Gulf of Mexico in a northwest to south
easterly direction. The drainage area for the Guadalupe River is 5953 square miles
(Reference 2.4.11-1). The San Antonio River watershed extends from north of San Antonio, Texas to
its confluence with the Guadalupe River just upstream from Tivoli, Texas. The San Antonio River
watershed is located on the south side of the Guadalupe River watershed and its drainage area is
4180 square miles (Reference 2.4.11-1). The boundaries for both watersheds are shown on
Figure 2.4.1-3. The total drainage area for the combined river basins at the stream gage at Tivoli,
Texas is 10,128 square miles, which includes the sub-watershed area from the confluence of the two
rivers up to the Tivoli gaging station (Reference 2.4.11-2).
Low flow conditions in the Guadalupe River will affect the availability of water for the RWMU system.
To assess supply adequacy during a 100-year drought, a low flow frequency analysis was performed
to determine the availability of makeup water for nonsafety-related cooling systems. In particular, the
100-year low flow condition was estimated to check for water supply adequacies in accordance with
RG 1.206 guidance. The results of this analysis are described below.
The USGS gaging station nearest to the RWMU intake canal is located at Tivoli, Texas, downstream
of the confluence of the Guadalupe and San Antonio Rivers (Reference 2.4.11-2). However, the
historical stream flow data at the Tivoli gaging station are discontinuous and incomplete and a
2.4.11-2
Revision 1
Victoria County Station
ESP Application
Part 2 — Site Safety Analysis Report
long-term record is not available. Historical stream flow data were, therefore, estimated by combining
the stream flow records from upstream gaging stations. A review of the available USGS stream flow
data indicates that the Victoria gaging station on the Guadalupe River (Reference 2.4.11-3) and the
Goliad gaging station on the San Antonio River (Reference 2.4.11-4) have the longest period of
record and are the closest to the RWMU intake canal. As shown in Figure 2.4.1-6, the Victoria gaging
station is on the Guadalupe River upstream of its confluence with the San Antonio River, and the
Goliad gaging station is on the San Antonio River upstream of its confluence with the Guadalupe
River. Coleto Creek discharges to the Guadalupe River downstream of the Victoria gaging station.
However, Coleto Creek flows are regulated by a reservoir supplying cooling water to another power
plant, and during low flow periods there is essentially no flow released from the dam
(Reference 2.4.11-1). Consequently, the Coleto Creek flows were conservatively assumed to be
negligible for the low flow analysis. For this evaluation, the daily average flows recorded at Victoria
and Goliad gaging stations were added for the common period of record, to represent the
approximate Guadalupe’s River stream flow downstream of its confluence with the San Antonio
River. The common period of record extends from calendar year 1939–2007.
Using the stream flow record described above, average low flow rates for 7-, 30-, and 60- day
durations were calculated and analyzed statistically. Table 2.4.11-1 presents the estimated historical
rolling annual minimum 7-day average low flows for the Guadalupe River at the RWMU intake canal
for 1939 through 2007. Similarly, Tables 2.4.11-2 and 2.4.11-3 present the estimated rolling annual
minimum 30- and 60-day average low flows, respectively, for the same period of record. From these
tables, the historical minimum 7-, 30-, and 60-day average low flows are 46.3 cfs, 58.3 cfs, and 84.2
cfs, respectively, which all occurred in August 1956. A statistical evaluation of stream flow data
included in Tables 2.4.11-1 through 2.4.11-3 was conducted to determine the 100-year drought flows.
This analysis resulted in 7-day, 30-day, and 60-day low flows of 60.2 cfs, 80.1 cfs, and 104.5 cfs,
respectively, for the 100-year drought event (Table 2.4.11-4).
Major droughts are the result of several years of consecutive, below normal, rainfall on the
Guadalupe River watershed. Table 2.4.11-5 summarizes the annual rainfall recorded at the Victoria
Regional Airport meteorological station and the 7-, 30-, and 60-day flows. This data indicates that the
historic drought of 1956 was preceded by below normal annual rainfall from 1953 through 1955; while
1956 itself was the second driest year on record.
To determine the storage volume of the cooling basin, a water budget analysis was conducted using
60 years of stream flow data, which included the 1950–1956 drought of record, as described in
Subsection 2.4.8. The analysis uses as a basis a maximum annual diversion rate of 75,000 acre-feet
per year of makeup water from the Guadalupe River to the cooling basin. This annual diversion rate
is primarily based on estimates of the natural and forced evaporation from the cooling basin and an
allowance for seepage and blowdown losses from the basin and water losses from UHS/service
water mechanical draft cooling towers (for the applicable reactor technology). The RWMU system is
2.4.11-3
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Victoria County Station
ESP Application
Part 2 — Site Safety Analysis Report
capable of providing a maximum of 217 cfs to the cooling basin. Based on these arrangements and
estimates, the cooling basin storage capacity was determined to be adequate to allow continuous
operation of the plant for the drought of record with infrequent and reduced makeup, which is more
severe than the 100-year drought based on the low flow frequency analysis.
Currently there are no downstream dams that could affect the water supply to the makeup water
intake and no future dams are contemplated.
2.4.11.2
Low Water Resulting from Surges, Seiches, or Tsunamis
Any safety-related cooling systems for VCS, including a UHS, will not rely upon river or stream flow
rates or water levels for performance of their safety-related functions and are not affected by low
water resulting from surges, seiches, or tsunamis. The effects of these phenomena on the supply of
makeup water to the nonsafety-related cooling systems are described below.
Low water in the Guadalupe River resulting from surges, seiches, or tsunamis will not affect the
ability of the RWMU system to pump water to the cooling basin because low water level in the
Guadalupe River at the RWMU intake canal is maintained by the Saltwater Barrier and Diversion
Dam. As described in Subsection 2.4.5, floods resulting from surges, seiches, or tsunamis can affect
the Guadalupe River water levels and the operation of the RWMU system, but these phenomena
would have no effect on the performance of the nonsafety-related cooling basin. The cooling basin
storage capacity permits an extended period of reduced and infrequent makeup flow supply without
interruption to the operation of VCS.
Ice formation or ice jams causing low flow conditions are not expected, as described in
Subsection 2.4.7.
2.4.11.3
Historical Low Water
Stream flow gaging data collected in the Guadalupe and San Antonio watersheds since the 1930s
indicate that there have been major droughts in almost every decade since gaging began. During the
30-year period from 1941–1970, there were three major statewide droughts: the first from 1947–
1948, the second from 1950–1957, and the third from 1960–1967. The most severe of these
droughts occurred from 1950–1957. Recent less severe droughts in the South Central Texas Region
have also occurred from 1983–1984, 1987–1990, and in 1996, 1999, and 2006 (Reference 2.4.11-5).
The most recent regional drought occurred from 2007 to 2009 (Reference 2.4.11-6).
From annual 7-day and 60-day low flow data plotted in Figure 2.4.11-1, the Guadalupe River has
experienced a drought every 7–10 years in the 69 years prior to 2007. The historical low flows and
estimated 100-year low flows are described in Subsection 2.4.11.1. Since the drought of record that
occurred in the 1950s, many small dams and reservoirs have been built on the Guadalupe and San
2.4.11-4
Revision 1
Victoria County Station
ESP Application
Part 2 — Site Safety Analysis Report
Antonio Rivers contributing to the increase in the river base flows in the past two decades. There are
29 storage reservoirs in the Guadalupe River basin and 34 storage reservoirs in the San Antonio
River basin with storage capacities of at least 3000 acre-feet, as described in Subsection 2.4.1. In
addition, small water discharges by various municipalities have also contributed to this base flow as
well. As a result of these changes within the Guadalupe River watershed, the characteristics of river
base flows have been affected (increased). Consequently, the 100-year low flows reported in
Table 2.4.11-4 are conservatively estimated.
2.4.11.4
Future Controls
Any safety-related functions for VCS, including a UHS, will not rely upon river or stream flow rates or
water levels and are not affected by future uses or controls. The effects of future uses on flow rate,
duration, and levels for drought conditions on the nonsafety-related cooling systems are described
below.
The Guadalupe River is used to supply water to the cooling basin via the RWMU system at a
maximum annual diversion rate of 75,000 acre-feet. As demonstrated by the water budget analysis,
described in Subsection 2.4.8, the storage capacity of the cooling basin is adequate to allow
continuous plant operation through a drought event equivalent to the drought of record as is
described in Subsection 2.4.11.1. The future uses of the Guadalupe River will be through securing
water rights obtained during the COL application stage.
2.4.11.5
Plant Requirements
The capability of the nonsafety-related cooling basin to maintain a sufficient water level during
periods of drought in the Guadalupe River is described in Subsection 2.4.11.1. In addition, cooling
basin level will be closely monitored and the cooling basin filled to the design pool level of elevation
90.5 feet (27.6 meters) NAVD 88 whenever possible, using maximum pumping capacity, to ensure
sufficient inventory in the cooling basin is provided. The circulating water pump intake structure and
discharge structure on the cooling basin are designed based on a minimum water level in the basin of
71.5 feet NAVD 88.
Subsection 2.4.1.2.7 describes surface water users in the Guadalupe River and San Antonio River
basins. The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality maintains records of surface water
withdrawals for the state of Texas. Tables 2.4.1-8 through 2.4.1-10 identify the surface water users for
the Lower Guadalupe and Lower San Antonio River basins and locations of the surface water users
are shown in Figure 2.4.1-11. The sizing of the cooling basin has considered the effect of full
utilization of water rights on the water availability.
2.4.11-5
Revision 1
Victoria County Station
ESP Application
Part 2 — Site Safety Analysis Report
2.4.11.6
Heat Sink Dependability Requirements
The circulating water system is not a safety-related system. The safety-related emergency cooling
system for VCS would depend on the reactor technology selected. Some reactors use passive
cooling systems as their UHS and other reactors require mechanical draft UHS cooling towers and
water storage facilities with sufficient water inventory to maintain the plant in a safe shutdown mode
for 30 days with no makeup water supply. The safety-related UHS cooling towers would use the
cooling basin for makeup water and blowdown, but would not depend on the cooling basin to provide
emergency cooling for safe shutdown.
2.4.11.7
References
2.4.11-1
U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), USGS Data; Coleto Creek near Victoria Gaging
Station. Available at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/dv?cb_00060=on&cb_00065
=on &format=rdb&begin_date=1930-01-01&end_date=2008-05-14&site_
no=08177500&referred_module=sw, accessed May 15, 2008.
2.4.11-2
U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), USGS Data; Tivoli Gaging Station. Available at
http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/
dv?cb_00060=on&format=rdb&begin_date=1900-03-26&end_date=2008-03-25&
site_no=08188800&referred_module=sw, accessed March 25, 2008.
2.4.11-3
U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), USGS Data; Victoria Station. Available at http://
waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/
|dv?cb_00060=on&format=rdb&begin_date=1924-07-01&end_date=2008-03-25&
site_no=08176500&referred_module=sw, accessed March 25, 2008.
2.4.11-4
U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), USGS Data; Goliad Station. Available at http://
waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/
dv?cb_00060=on&format=rdb&begin_date=1856-02-17&end_date=2008-03-25&
site_no=08188500&referred_module=sw, accessed March 25, 2008.
2.4.11-5
Texas Water Development Board, Water for Texas 2007, Vol. II, Document No.
GP-8-1, January 2007.
2.4.11-6
Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority, Basin Briefing, November 2009, available at
http://www.gbra.org/Library/BasinBriefingNov2009.aspx, accessed February 22,
2010.
2.4.11-6
Revision 1
Victoria County Station
ESP Application
Part 2 — Site Safety Analysis Report
Table 2.4.11-1
Guadalupe River Annual Minimum 7-Day Flows
Date
Annual Min
flow (cfs)
Date
Annual Min
flow (cfs)
10/1939
460
08/1974
973
09/1940
525
11/1975
1,233
09/1941
1,168
04/1976
1,069
06/1942
931
10/1977
1,234
08/1943
792
07/1978
741
08/1944
927
11/1979
1,162
09/1945
736
08/1980
630
08/1946
743
01/1981
1,127
10/1947
766
09/1982
668
08/1948
426
09/1983
701
01/1949
559
09/1984
210
11/1950
419
09/1985
907
08/1951
243
08/1986
854
09/1952
189
12/1987
1,465
08/1953
212
11/1988
710
08/1954
129
10/1989
226
05/1955
152
07/1990
404
08/1956
46
08/1991
885
01/1957
207
10/1992
1,829
09/1958
824
10/1993
1,042
09/1959
830
08/1994
689
06/1960
707
10/1995
750
06/1961
1,062
08/1996
136
08/1962
394
02/1997
801
08/1963
199
08/1998
535
08/1964
245
11/1999
687
01/1965
683
08/2000
374
08/1966
751
08/2001
711
08/1967
147
06/2002
906
11/1968
1,055
08/2003
1,318
08/1969
757
06/2004
1,472
09/1970
863
11/2005
985
07/1971
243
09/2006
349
04/1972
912
03/2007
853
01/1973
1,219
–
–
2.4.11-7
Revision 1
Victoria County Station
ESP Application
Part 2 — Site Safety Analysis Report
Table 2.4.11-2
Guadalupe River Annual Minimum 30-Day Flows
Date
Annual Min
flow (cfs)
Date
Annual Min
flow (cfs)
10/1939
513
08/1974
1,059
10/1940
582
12/1975
1,248
12/1941
1,248
03/1976
1,203
04/1942
994
10/1977
1,335
09/1943
861
07/1978
818
01/1944
1,015
11/1979
1,248
09/1945
860
08/1980
693
08/1946
831
01/1981
1,154
10/1947
797
09/1982
726
08/1948
480
09/1983
783
01/1949
582
08/1984
247
11/1950
447
09/1985
1,001
09/1951
271
09/1986
911
09/1952
215
12/1987
1,810
08/1953
283
12/1988
737
09/1954
153
10/1989
275
11/1955
166
07/1990
555
08/1956
58
01/2001
848
02/1957
225
11/1992
1,895
09/1958
896
10/1993
1,088
10/1959
939
08/1994
838
06/1960
932
11/1995
829
06/1961
1,223
08/1996
233
08/1962
435
01/1997
902
09/1963
216
08/1998
644
08/1964
294
10/1999
713
01/1965
714
09/2000
397
12/1966
778
08/2001
753
07/1967
264
06/2002
1,037
11/1968
1,094
09/2003
1,469
08/1969
817
01/2004
1,541
12/1970
895
11/2005
1,067
08/1971
342
09/2006
411
04/1972
1,077
01/2007
840
01/1973
1,229
–
–
2.4.11-8
Revision 1
Victoria County Station
ESP Application
Part 2 — Site Safety Analysis Report
Table 2.4.11-3
Guadalupe River Annual Minimum 60-Day Low Flows
Date
Annual Min
flow (cfs)
Date
Annual Min
flow (cfs)
10/1939
546
08/1974
1,418
01/1940
591
12/1975
1,428
12/1941
1,386
04/1976
1,241
04/1942
1,057
10/1977
1,587
11/1943
932
04/1978
1,431
01/1944
996
12/1979
1,263
09/1945
904
09/1980
940
08/1946
967
01/1981
1,236
11/1947
816
10/1982
760
12/1948
574
09/1983
939
01/1949
579
09/1984
265
12/1950
471
09/1985
1,181
09/1951
314
09/1986
1,133
09/1952
400
12/1987
1,882
08/1953
368
12/1988
747
09/1954
161
10/1989
310
11/1955
178
02/1990
698
08/1956
84
01/1991
911
02/1957
282
11/1992
1,972
09/1958
1,086
10/1993
1,133
10/1959
1,001
09/1994
845
01/1960
1,554
12/1995
893
06/1961
1,472
08/1996
297
09/1962
510
01/1997
806
09/1963
233
08/1998
748
08/1964
530
11/1999
738
01/1965
768
09/2000
438
12/1966
820
08/2001
882
08/1967
302
06/2002
1,152
11/1968
1,132
12/2003
1,694
08/1969
937
01/2004
1,612
12/1970
914
12/2005
1,125
08/1971
494
09/2006
464
04/1972
1,276
01/2007
765
01/1973
1,274
–
2.4.11-9
–
Revision 1
Victoria County Station
ESP Application
Part 2 — Site Safety Analysis Report
Table 2.4.11-4
Estimated 100-Year Frequency Low Flows for Guadalupe River Near Tivoli, Texas
Return
Period
Minimum Low Flows in (cfs) from Log-Pearson Type 3 Analysis
(years)
7-Day Low Flow
30-Day Low Flow
60-Day Low Flow
100
60.2
80.1
104.5
2.4.11-10
Revision 1
Victoria County Station
ESP Application
Part 2 — Site Safety Analysis Report
Table 2.4.11-5
Total Annual Rainfall of Victoria vs. Annual Minimum Low Flows
of The Guadalupe River at Tivoli
Calendar
Year
Annual
Rainfall
(in)
7-Day
30-Day
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
34.6
25.8
39.5
18.1
29.8
34.9
23.0
19.9
24.9
18.0
47.6
41.0
35.2
50.3
36.1
25.9
22.1
33.3
30.9
35.4
33.9
49.3
44.6
39.8
36.1
42.4
45.7
43.3
37.0
43.3
766
426
559
419
243
189
212
129
152
46
207
824
830
707
1062
394
199
245
683
751
147
1055
757
863
243
912
1219
973
1233
1069
797
480
582
447
271
215
283
153
166
58
225
896
939
932
1223
435
216
294
714
778
264
1094
817
895
342
1077
1229
1059
1248
1203
60-Day
Calendar
Year
Annual
Rainfall
(in)
7-Day
30-Day
60-Day
816
574
579
471
314
400
368
161
178
84
282
1086
1001
1554
1472
510
233
530
768
820
302
1132
937
914
494
1276
1274
1418
1428
1241
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
39.2
45.0
49.3
32.5
45.1
32.5
42.4
33.9
36.7
39.2
43.1
15.9
25.8
35.8
56.7
51.4
51.4
43.7
33.5
25.8
67.2
46.4
27.0
36.8
42.8
39.1
38.7
73.5
34.9
39.4
1234
741
1162
630
1127
668
701
210
907
854
1465
710
226
404
885
1829
1042
689
750
136
801
535
687
374
711
906
1318
1472
985
349
1335
818
1248
693
1154
726
783
247
1001
911
1810
737
275
555
848
1895
1088
838
829
233
902
644
713
397
753
1037
1469
1541
1067
411
1587
1431
1263
940
1236
760
939
265
1181
1133
1882
747
310
698
911
1972
1133
845
893
297
806
748
738
438
882
1152
1694
1612
1125
464
Low Flow (cfs)
2.4.11-11
Low Flow (cfs)
Revision 1
Victoria County Station
ESP Application
Part 2 — Site Safety Analysis Report
2000
7-Day-Average Low Flow
1800
60-Day-Average Low Flow
1600
1200
1000
800
600
400
200
2007
2005
2003
2001
1999
1997
1995
1993
1991
1989
1987
1985
1983
1981
1979
1977
1975
1973
1971
1969
1967
1965
1963
1961
1959
1957
1955
1953
1951
1949
1947
1945
1943
1941
0
1939
Minimum Flow, cfs
1400
Calendar Year
Figure 2.4.11-1
Historic Minimum Low Flows for Guadalupe River near Tivoli, Texas
2.4.11-12
Revision 1
Fly UP