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• Equations Dog Gone Lesson 12-1 R epresenting Situations with Equations

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• Equations Dog Gone Lesson 12-1 R epresenting Situations with Equations
Equations
ACTIVITY 12
Dog Gone
Lesson 12-1 Representing Situations with Equations
Learning Targets:
Write one-variable, one-step equations to represent situations.
Distinguish between expressions and equations.
•
•
SUGGESTED LEARNING STRATEGIES: Marking the Text, Shared
Reading, Create Representations, Discussion Groups, Sharing and
Responding
Brynn has been volunteering at the animal shelter and has decided that
she would like to adopt one of the puppies. Her parents have said that
before she can have a puppy, they must fence in a portion of the backyard.
At the local home improvement store, her parents have determined that
they can afford 360 feet of fencing materials. Brynn’s parents have agreed to
let her choose how she wants to build the fence as long as she takes into
consideration the trees, storage building, and deck already in the back yard.
My Notes
MATH TERMS
An equation is a statement showing
that two numbers or expressions
are equal, such as 4 + 3 = 7. An
equation has an equal sign while
an expression does not.
The solution of an equation is
the numeric value of a variable
that makes the equation a true
statement.
Brynn decides it will be easiest to fence in a rectangular area and
remembers that the formula for finding the perimeter of a rectangle is
P = 2l + 2w, where P represents the perimeter, l represents the length,
and w represents the width. The formula P = 2l + 2w is an example of
an equation. In algebra, we use equations to determine solutions to
problems. The value or values of a variable that make an equation true
are the solutions to the equation.
© 2014 College Board. All rights reserved.
1. Use substitution to rewrite the formula P = 2l + 2w to represent the
amount of fencing materials that Brynn’s family can afford.
2. Brynn decides she can create an entrance from the existing deck to
the fenced portion of the yard if she makes the enclosure 30 feet wide.
Use substitution to rewrite the formula P = 2l + 2w to represent this
new information.
It is important to represent real-world situations with algebraic expressions
and equations. Solving the resulting equations helps determine answers to
real-life problems.
Activity 12 • Equations
149
Lesson 12-1
Representing Situations with Equations
ACTIVITY 12
continued
My Notes
Example A
Write an equation to represent this situation.
What number do you add to 15 to get 23?
Step 1: Write a verbal model.
A number + 15 = 23
MATH TIP
To define a variable, choose a
variable to represent an unknown
number or quantity and tell what
that variable represents.
Step 2: Define variables for unknown quantities.
Let n = the number
Step 3: Write an equation using a variable for any unknown quantity.
n + 15 = 23
Try These A
Write an equation to represent each situation.
a. What number do you add to 86 to get 95?
CONNECT TO AP
Throughout your study of
mathematics you will model
written descriptions of physical
situations with algebraic
expressions and equations.
b. What number do you multiply 7 by to get 56?
3. Reason abstractly. Madison and Tanisha went out to lunch. The
bill for their lunches came to $18.94. Madison knows that her lunch
cost $9.72. How much did Tanisha’s lunch cost?
a. Write a verbal model for the situation.
c. Write an equation using a variable for any unknown quantity to
represent the situation.
Expressions consist of variables, numbers, and operation symbols,
while equations also contain an equal sign.
4. Determine below whether each is an equation or an expression.
a. 5x − 9
b. 2x + 6 = 50
c. 8x2 − 64 = 0
d. 90(3a + 2b − c)
150
Unit 3 • Expressions and Equations
© 2014 College Board. All rights reserved.
b. Define a variable for the unknown quantity.
Lesson 12-1
Representing Situations with Equations
ACTIVITY 12
continued
My Notes
Check Your Understanding
Write an equation for each situation. Show your verbal model and
define the variable you use.
5. What number do you subtract from 59 to get 31?
6. What number do you multiply by 10 to get 210?
7. What number do you divide by 12 to get 9?
8. Brynn needs to save $125 to build a doghouse for her new puppy.
She has saved $68. How much more does she need to save?
Identify each as an expression or an equation.
9. 8x − 3 = 5
10. 8x − 3
11. 2 = 4x
LESSON 12-1 PRACTICE
Write an equation for each situation. Show your verbal model and define
the variable you use.
© 2014 College Board. All rights reserved.
12. What number must be multiplied by 5 to get 35?
13. What number is subtracted from 12 to get 9?
14. The recycling club has a goal to recycle 2,000 pounds of newspaper
this year. They have already recycled 1,585 pounds. How many more
pounds do they need to recycle to meet their goal?
15. Reason abstractly. Mrs. Smith is having a graduation party for all of
the eighth-grade students in her school. She is making 120 cupcakes
to serve at the party. She needs to buy trays to hold the cupcakes. Each
tray will hold 24 cupcakes. How many trays will she need to buy?
16. Brynn can feed her puppy for $1.99 per week. How many weeks will
a bag of puppy chow last if it costs $11.94?
Identify each as an expression or an equation.
17. 4x
18. 14x + 2y + 3
19. 6x2 = 24
20. y − 5 = 2
Activity 12 • Equations
151
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