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Anti-Reproductive-Rights Crimes ) in California, 2003 More
Anti-Reproductive-Rights Crimes
in California, 2003
More )
Bill Lockyer, Attorney General
California Department of Justice
Division of California Justice Information Services
Bureau of Criminal Information and Analysis
CRIMINAL JUSTICE STATISTICS CENTER
) LINKS TO:
Introduction
CJSC Publications
Data Analysis
Appendices
CJSC Home Page AG Home Page
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
Bill Lockyer, Attorney General
DIVISION OF CALIFORNIA JUSTICE INFORMATION SERVICES
Nick Dedier, Director/CIO
BUREAU OF CRIMINAL INFORMATION AND ANALYSIS
Doug Smith, Deputy Director
CRIMINAL JUSTICE STATISTICS CENTER
Jack Scheidegger, Assistant Chief
Steve Galeria, Program Manager
REPORT PREPARED BY
Adele Spears, Analyst
REPORT DESIGNED BY
Rebecca Bowe
REPORT EDITED BY
Tad Davis
Acknowledgments
Debbie Sasaki, Analyst
Robin Tipton, Technician
Donna Isley-Robinson, Technician
The role of the CRIMINAL JUSTICE STATISTICS CENTER is to:
■
Collect, analyze, and report statistical data which provide valid measures
of crime and the criminal justice process.
■
Examine these data on an ongoing basis to better describe crime and the
criminal justice system.
■
Promote the responsible presentation and use of crime statistics.
More )
ii ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
Contents
Introduction ............................................................................................................. 1
Data spreadsheet .................................................................................................... 2
Data analysis
Events, offenses, victims, and suspects ................................................................ 4
Offenses ............................................................................................................... 5
Victims ................................................................................................................. 6
Suspects .............................................................................................................. 7
Appendices
Appendix I - Legislation ......................................................................................... 11
Appendix II - Information Bulletin 02-15-BCIA ....................................................... 23
Appendix III - Monthly Report of Anti-Reproductive-Rights Crimes (ARRC),
Summary Worksheet ....................................................................................... 24
Appendix IV - Anti-Reproductive-Rights Crimes (ARRC), Data Collection
Worksheet ....................................................................................................... 26
Tables
1 Anti-reproductive-rights crimes in California, 2003
Events, offenses, victims, and suspects by county and jurisdiction ................... 4
2 Anti-reproductive-rights crimes in California, 2003
Type of offense by offense level, crime of violence, location, and weapon .......... 5
3 Anti-reproductive-rights crimes in California, 2003
Type of victim by race/ethnic group, gender, age, property description,
type of loss or damage, and value of property ................................................... 6
4 Anti-reproductive-rights crimes in California, 2003
Type of offense by race/ethnic group, gender, and age of suspect ..................... 7
More )
CONTENTS
iii
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
Introduction
Senate Bill 780, effective January 1, 2002, enacted two new laws: the California Freedom of Access to Clinic and Church
Entrances (or California FACE) Act, and the Reproductive Rights Law Enforcement Act. The Reproductive Rights Law
Enforcement Act added sections 13775 through 13779 to the California Penal Code requiring the Attorney General to collect
and analyze information relating to anti-reproductive-rights crimes and submit a report to the Legislature. This publication is
the result of that mandate.1
An “anti-reproductive-rights crime” is defined in section 13776 (a) of the California Penal Code as “a crime committed partly or
wholly because the victim is a reproductive health services client, provider, or assistant, or a crime that is partly or wholly
intended to intimidate the victim, any other person or entity, or any class of persons or entities from becoming or remaining a
reproductive health services client, provider, or assistant.”
In order to collect crime statistics mandated by the Reproductive Rights Law Enforcement Act, the Department of Justice (DOJ)
mailed Information Bulletin 02-09-BCIA (June 2002) to California law enforcement agencies throughout the state. This bulletin
announced new statistical reporting requirements for anti-reproductive-rights crimes, as well as the development of an
automated reporting system. Guidelines for sending these crime data to the DOJ were provided in Information Bulletin 02-15BCIA (see Appendices).
Information collected by the department includes the date of event; the county and law enforcement jurisdiction where the
crime occurred; the number of crime events, offenses, victims, and suspects involved; the type of offenses committed (e.g.,
vandalism); the offense level (felony or misdemeanor); the nature of the crime (violent or nonviolent); the location of the crime
(e.g., a health facility); whether or not a weapon was used (if so, what kind); the race/ethnic group, gender, and age of the
victims and suspects involved; a description of involved property (e.g., automobile or structure); the type of property damage;
and the estimated value of that property.
This publication includes information reported to the DOJ by California law enforcement agencies for 2003. A data
spreadsheet, which allows the reader to evaluate information pertaining to each anti-reproductive-rights crime reported, is
included. Data tables, which organize and quantify these data, are also included. Because this is the first year antireproductive-rights crime data have been reported to the DOJ, and until trend data become available, conclusions based on
the information in this report should be reached with caution.
Selected findings for 2003:
Q
Ten anti-reproductive-rights crimes were reported to the DOJ. (Because no trend data exist, the DOJ cannot determine
whether the number of crimes reported for 2003 are representative of the number that will be reported in future years.)
Q
Anti-reproductive-rights crimes occurred in seven of California’s 58 counties. These seven counties range in size from
most populous in the state (Los Angeles) to Shasta (ranked 29th in population size).2
Q
Eleven anti-reproductive-rights offenses were reported; all 11 were misdemeanors and only one was reported as a
crime of violence. Vandalism was the most frequently reported offense (six). These reported offenses are consistent
with a 2002 report published by the California Senate Office of Research which found that “threats of violence,
vandalism, non-injury assaults, and blockades” were the most common crimes reported in a survey of 172 publicly
identified California abortion providers.3
Q
Health facilities were the most frequently reported location of anti-reproductive-rights offenses.
Q
The value of property damaged was minimal (between $0 and $100 per offense).
Q
Most individual victims of anti-reproductive-rights crimes were white. Slightly over half of all individual victims were male
and slightly over half of all individual victims were aged 40 and over.
Q
Information about six suspects was reported; all were male, two were white, and three were Hispanic.
1
See also Special Report to the Legislature on Senate Bill 780 - California Freedom of Access to Clinic and Church Entrances Act and
Reproductive Rights Law Enforcement Act, authored by Robert R. Springborn, Ph.D., and published by the DOJ in June 2003.
2
County population rankings were obtained from the California Department of Finance.
3
See Crimes Against Reproductive Rights in California, authored by Gregory deGiere and published by the California Senate Office of
Research in January 2002.
More )
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
Data
Event
Total
1
events
Date
of
event
County
Offense
Reporting
Total
agency
offenses
Offense
level
Crime
of
Offense
(Fel/Misd)
violence
Location
Weapon
Misd
Misd
Misd
Misd
Misd
Misd
Misd
Misd
No
No
No
No
Yes
No
No
No
Residence/home/driveway
Residence/home/driveway
Residence/home/driveway
Residence/home/driveway
Commercial/office building
Commercial/office building
Private/public health facility
Private/public health facility
None
None
None
None
Fire/incendiary device
None
None
None
Misd
Misd
Misd
No
No
No
Private/public health facility
Private/public health facility
Private/public health facility
Spray paint
None
Rock
10
1
1
1
1
1
1
01/14/03
03/19/03
03/30/03
03/30/03
04/17/03
05/03/03
Contra Costa
San Luis Obispo
San Luis Obispo
San Luis Obispo
Stanislaus
Los Angeles
Pleasant Hill PD
San Luis Obispo PD
San Luis Obispo PD
San Luis Obispo PD
Modesto PD
Whittier PD
11
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
05/14/03
Shasta
Redding PD
2
Assault and battery
Malicious mischief
Vandalism
Vandalism
Vandalism
Vandalism
Assault and battery
Assault and battery
1
1
1
06/09/03
11/12/03
11/22/03
Los Angeles
Orange
Sonoma
Whittier PD
Orange PD
Santa Rosa PD
1
1
1
Vandalism
Disturbing the peace
Vandalism
Note: Dash indicates that data are not applicable or no information was reported.
1
An “event” is an occurrence of one or more criminal offenses committed against one or more victims by one or more suspects/perpetrators.
2
A “victim” may be an individual, a reproductive health facility, a residence, etc. A victim can have more than one offense committed against them.
More )
2
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
Spreadsheet
Suspect information
Victim information
Individual
Total
2
victims
11
1
1
1
1
1
1
Property
Type
of
Race/
ethnic group
Gender
of
Age
of
Property
Type
of loss
Value
of
Total
Race/
ethnic group
Gender
of
Age
of
victim
of victim
victim
victim
description
or damage
property
suspects
of suspect
suspect
suspect
6
1
1
-
Unknown
Hispanic
-
Male
Male
-
Unknown
Unknown
-
White
Hispanic
Hispanic
White
-
Male
Male
Male
Male
-
72
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
-
2
Individual-other
Individual-other
Individual-other
Individual-other
Property-business
Property-business
Individual-employee
Individual-other
White
White
White
White
White
White
Male
Female
Male
Male
Female
Male
67
37
44
57
47
32
Automobile
Automobile
Automobile
Structure
Structure
-
Vandalized
Vandalized
Vandalized
Burned
Vandalized
-
$0
$0
$0
Unknown
$40
-
1
1
1
Property-health facility
Individual-employee
Property-business
Unknown
-
Female
-
31
-
Structure
Structure
Vandalized
Vandalized
$50
Unknown
1
2
1
-
In 2003, ten anti-reproductive-rights crime events were reported to the California Department of Justice. The Data
Spreadsheet (above) allows the reader of this publication to evaluate information pertaining to each of these events
beginning with the date of occurrence (left side of spreadsheet) and ending with suspect information (right side of
spreadsheet). Tables 1 through 4 organize and quantify data by categories. Until trend data become available,
conclusions based on the information in this report should be reached with caution.
More )
DATA SPREADSHEET
3
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
Data Analysis
Table 1
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
Events, Offenses, Victims, and Suspects by County and Jurisdiction
County and jurisdiction
Total
Contra Costa County - Pleasant Hill PD
Los Angeles County - Whittier PD
Orange County - Orange PD
San Luis Obispo County - San Luis Obispo PD
Shasta County - Redding PD
Sonoma County - Santa Rosa PD
Stanislaus County - Modesto PD
1
2
Events1
Offenses
Victims2
Suspects
10
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
11
1
2
1
3
2
1
1
11
1
2
1
3
2
1
1
6
1
2
1
0
1
0
1
An "event" is an occurrence of one or more criminal offenses committed against one or more victims by one or more suspects/perpetrators.
A "victim" may be an individual, a reproductive health facility, a religious facility, a residence, etc. A victim can have more than one offense committed
against them.
Events, Offenses, Victims, and Suspects: Data in Table 1 provide information about anti-reproductive-rights crimes
reported to the California Department of Justice by law enforcement agencies throughout the state for 2003. Four sets
of data are displayed: reported crime events, offenses, victims, and suspects. An “event” is an occurrence in which one
or more criminal offenses were perpetrated. “Offense” information displays the number of offenses occurring during the
commission of an anti-reproductive-rights crime event (see Table 2 for more detail). “Victim” information displays the
number of anti-reproductive-rights crime event victims (see Table 3 for more detail). Finally, “suspect” information
displays the number of persons suspected of committing anti-reproductive-rights crimes in California (see Table 4 for
more detail). All data in Table 1 are displayed by the county and jurisdiction of crime occurrence.
In 2003,
Q
Ten anti-reproductive-rights crime events occurred and were reported to the California Department of Justice by
seven law enforcement agencies in seven counties. Two agencies, the San Luis Obispo Police Department and
the Whittier Police Department, accounted for one-half (five) of the events reported. One agency, the San Luis
Obispo Police Department, reported three separate events; two of these events occurred on the same day (see
Data Spreadsheet on prior page).
Q
Eleven offenses occurred during the commission of the ten anti-reproductive-rights crime events reported. Multiple
offenses for one crime event were reported by the Redding Police Department, the only agency to report more
than one offense committed during the commission of an anti-reproductive-rights crime.
Q
Eleven individual/property victims of anti-reproductive-rights crimes were reported. The Redding Police
Department reported the only event involving more than one victim (two individuals).
Q
Information about six suspects was reported to the California Department of Justice. Because reported data are
limited, it cannot be determined if or when a suspect was involved in more than one crime event. Therefore, the
number of suspects reported in this category may not represent the total number of persons involved in the
commission of anti-reproductive-rights crimes.
More )
4
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
Table 2
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
Type of Offense by Offense Level, Crime of Violence, Location, and Weapon
Type
of
offense
Total
Assault and battery
Disturbing the peace
Malicious mischief
Vandalism
1
Offense
level
Crime
of violence
Total
Location
Weapon
Residence/ Commercial/
Fire/
Private/
home/
office
public health incendiary Other1 None
driveway
device
building
facility
Felony
Misd
Yes
No
11
0
11
1
10
4
2
5
1
2
8
3
1
1
6
0
0
0
0
3
1
1
6
0
0
0
1
3
1
1
5
1
0
1
2
0
0
0
2
2
1
0
2
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
2
3
1
1
3
This category includes one offense in which spray paint was used and another offense in which a rock was used.
Offenses: Table 2 displays the level of each anti-reproductive-rights offense reported to the California Department of
Justice. An offense reported as a felony is punishable by death or imprisonment in a state prison; an offense reported
as a misdemeanor is punishable by imprisonment in a county jail for up to one year. Table 2 also displays offenses
reported as a crime of violence. To be reported as a crime of violence, an offense must involve “the use, attempted use,
or threatened use of physical force against the person or property of another” as defined by section 423.1 of the
California Penal Code. The location at which offenses occurred and the type of weapons used to commit those
offenses are also displayed. All data in Table 2 are displayed by the type of offense reported.
In 2003,
Q
Eleven offenses occurred during the commission of the ten anti-reproductive-rights crime events reported to the
California Department of Justice. Vandalism was the most frequently reported offense (six), followed by assault
and battery (three), disturbing the peace, and malicious mischief (one each).
Q
Vandalism occurred with equal frequency at residences (two), commercial/office buildings (two), and private/public
health facilities (two). Two of three reported assault and battery offenses occurred at private/public health
facilities.
Q
All 11 offenses were reported as misdemeanors.
Q
One offense (vandalism) was reported as a crime of violence.
Q
Private/public health facilities were the most frequently reported location of anti-reproductive-rights offenses (five),
followed by residences (four), and commercial/office buildings (two).
Q
Three of 11 offenses involved the use of a weapon of any sort. An incendiary device was used in one vandalism
offense; spray paint and a rock were reported as weapons used in two additional vandalism offenses.
More )
DATA ANALYSIS
5
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
Table 3
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
Type of Victim by Race/Ethnic Group, Gender, Age, Property Description, Type of Loss or Damage, and Value of Property
2
Individual
Type
of
1
victim
Race/
ethnic group
of victim
Total
White Other
Total
Gender
of victim
Age of victim
40
UnUnder
Unand
Male Female
known
40
known
over
Property
description
Auto
Property
Type
of loss
or damage
Value
of property
StrucVandal- $0- $50UnBurned
ture
ized
$49 $100 known
11
Individual
Employee
Other
7
2
5
6
1
5
0
0
0
1
1
0
4
0
4
3
2
1
3
1
2
4
1
3
0
0
0
3
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
0
3
3
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
Property
Business
Health facility
4
3
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
0
0
0
4
3
1
1
1
0
3
2
1
1
1
0
1
0
1
2
2
0
Note: Dash indicates that data are not applicable or no information was reported.
A "victim" may be an individual, a reproductive health facility, a religious facility, a residence, etc.
2
Of seven individual victims, three reported property damage; therefore, counts for "property description," "type of loss or damage," and "value of property"
will not equal the total number of individual victims.
1
Victims: Table 3 displays the race/ethnic group, gender, and age of individuals reported to the California Department of
Justice as having been an anti-reproductive-rights crime victim, any property damage they may have incurred, and
information about property victims. All data in this table are displayed by the two types of anti-reproductive-rights crime
victims (individual or property). An “individual” victim is recorded when an anti-reproductive-rights crime has been
reported as having occurred against a person. Individuals are recorded as either clients or employees of reproductive
health services facilities, or as “other” (neither clients nor employees). An individual may also report property damage.
The second type of victim, “property,” is recorded when an anti-reproductive-rights crime has been reported as having
occurred against property only. Property victims are recorded as either health facilities (includes hospitals, abortion
clinics, family planning clinics, etc.), businesses, religious organizations (includes buildings associated with a specific
religious group), or other entities.
In 2003,
6
Q
Eleven individual/property victims of anti-reproductive-rights crimes were reported to the California Department of
Justice. Individual victims were the most frequently reported (seven).
Q
Of seven individual victims reported, two were employees of reproductive health services facilities and five were not
employees nor clients of these facilities. Of four property victims reported, three were businesses and one was a
health facility.
Q
Of seven individual victims, six were white and one victim’s race/ethnicity was reported as “unknown.”
Q
Males were victimized slightly more often than females (four victims were male; three victims were female).
Q
Individuals aged 40 and over were victimized slightly more often than individuals under age 40 (four victims were
aged 40 and over; three victims were under the age of 40).
Q
Three of seven individual victims reported vandalism to automobiles resulting in less than $50 in damages per
offense.
Q
Four structures were reported as victims; one was burned and three were vandalized. The value of property
damage was reported for two of four of these structures. Damages to one business were reported as less than
$50 and damages to one health facility were reported as between $50 and $100.
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
More )
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
Table 4
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
Type of Offense by Race/Ethnic Group, Gender, and Age of Suspect
Type
of
offense
Total
suspects
White
Total
Assault and battery
Disturbing the peace
Vandalism
Gender
of
suspect
Race/ethnic group
of
suspect
Hispanic Other
Unknown
Male
Female
Age
of
suspect
Under
40
40 and
over
Unknown
6
2
3
0
1
6
0
0
1
5
2
1
3
1
1
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
1
0
0
2
1
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
1
3
Suspects: Table 4 displays the race/ethnic group, gender, and age of persons suspected of committing antireproductive-rights crimes in California. It should be noted that a single suspect may commit multiple offenses and
multiple suspects may commit a single offense. Additionally, data about suspects may be unknown and therefore
unreported. All data in Table 4 are displayed by the type of offense reported.
In 2003,
Q
Information about six suspects was reported to the California Department of Justice. These six suspects were
associated with three types of anti-reproductive-rights offenses. Two suspects committed assault and battery,
one suspect was associated with disturbing the peace, and three suspects committed vandalism.
Q
Two suspects were white, three were Hispanic, and one suspect’s race/ethnic group was reported as “unknown.”
Q
All six suspects were male. One suspect was aged 40 and over; five suspects’ ages were reported as “unknown.”
More )
DATA ANALYSIS
7
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
Appendix I
LEGISLATION
Senate Bill No. 780
CHAPTER 899
An act to add Title 11.7 (commencing with Section 423) of Part 1 of, and
to add and repeal Title 5.7 (commencing with Section 13775) to Part 4 of,
the Penal Code, relating to the protection of constitutional rights.
[Approved by Governor October 14, 2001. Filed
with Secretary of State October 14, 2001.]
LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL’S DIGEST
SB 780, Ortiz. Protection of the exercise of constitutional rights.
Existing provisions of federal law make it a crime and provide a civil
remedy for the commission of certain activities that interfere with a
person’s access to reproductive health services facilities or with a
person’s participation in religious services or that damage or destroy
property of a reproductive health facility or place of worship.
Existing provisions of state law authorize a civil action for damages
resulting from the commission of specified activities that interfere with
a person’s access to a health facility or with the facility’s functioning, and
a court in which a proceeding for this relief is filed, is required to take
all reasonable action to protect, as specified, the parties and witnesses in
the matter.
Under other existing provisions of state law, it is a crime to make a
threat, as specified, causing a person to refrain from engaging in a
religious service or to commit an act of terrorism, as specified, at a place
of religious worship or at a location where abortion counseling services,
education, or other specified activities are conducted. Existing law also
makes it a crime to damage or destroy the real or personal property of
a place of worship or to interfere with the exercise of a person’s religious
beliefs because of his or her religion.
Under existing law, the Attorney General is required to collect from
local law enforcement agencies information relating to crimes motivated
by, among other personal characteristics, a person’s religion, which the
Department of Justice analyzes and submits in an annual report to the
Legislature.
This bill would add similar provisions in state law to make it a crime
and would provide a civil remedy for the commission of the acts
prohibited under federal law, as described above. The bill would require
a court in proceedings regarding the prohibited acts to take all actions
reasonably required to protect the safety and privacy of the parties,
witnesses, and persons who are victims, or at risk of becoming victims,
More )
APPENDICES 11
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
of the prohibited activities. This bill would allow specified persons to
use pseudonyms in civil actions related to prohibited acts. The bill would
authorize as remedies in the civil action injunctive relief, compensatory
and punitive damages, attorney’s fees, costs of the suit, and statutory
damages. This bill would also authorize the Attorney General, a district
attorney, or a city attorney to file an action to enjoin prohibited acts, for
compensatory damages to persons aggrieved by prohibited acts, and for
civil penalties, as specified.
The bill would also require the Attorney General to assume specified
duties related to planning, information gathering, and analysis with
respect to anti-reproductive-rights crimes, as defined. The bill would
also require the Attorney General to submit various reports on this issue
to the Legislature. The bill would require the Commission on Peace
Officer Standards and Training to develop a training course on
anti-reproductive-rights crimes. This bill would provide that the
requirements for information gathering, reporting, planning, and course
development related to anti-reproductive-rights crimes would be
repealed on January 1, 2007.
Because this bill would create a new crime and would impose a
reporting requirement on local law enforcement agencies, it would
impose a state-mandated program.
The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local
agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state.
Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that
reimbursement, including the creation of a State Mandates Claims Fund
to pay the costs of mandates that do not exceed $1,000,000 statewide and
other procedures for claims whose statewide costs exceed $1,000,000.
This bill would provide that with regard to certain mandates no
reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.
With regard to any other mandates, this bill would provide that, if the
Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs
so mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made
pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.
The people of the State of California do enact as follows:
SECTION 1. The Legislature finds the following:
(a) Federal law enforcement activities proved effective between 1993
and 2001, in reducing and punishing crimes intended to violate a
woman’s right to reproductive choice. However, the level and threat of
those crimes in 2001 remained unacceptably high, and continued and
increased law enforcement remained necessary.
12
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
(b) Federal actions that proved effective in reducing and punishing
these crimes include the vigorous criminal and civil enforcement of the
Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act of 1994 (18 U.S.C. Sec. 248)
by the United States Department of Justice and the United States
Attorney’s Office; the creation by the United States Department of
Justice of the national Task Force on Violence Against Health Care
Providers that gathers and analyzes information, which is made
available to law enforcement agencies and prosecutors, on threats
against reproductive health service providers and those persons
suspected of engaging in this activity; the creation by the United States
Attorney’s Office of regional task forces on violence against abortion
providers that coordinate federal, state, and local law enforcement
efforts in connection with preventing this activity; the provision of
instruction by the United States Marshals Service to ensure reproductive
health services providers are able to promptly communicate threats they
receive to the appropriate federal, state, and local law enforcement
officials; other security training and advice provided by the United
States Marshals Services and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and
Firearms to reproductive health service providers; the protection
provided by the United States Marshals Service, the Bureau of Alcohol,
Tobacco, and Firearms, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation to those
persons most at risk from anti-reproductive-rights crime; the training of
law enforcement officers and reproductive health services providers in
regional sessions sponsored by the United States Attorney’s Offices in
cooperation with the Feminist Majority Foundation, the National
Abortion Federation, and the Planned Parenthood Federation of
America, and certified by the Commission on Peace Officer Standards
and Training; and the instruction provided by the United States
Department of Justice and Federal Bureau of Investigation personnel in
those training sessions.
(c) It is the intent of the Legislature that state and local law
enforcement agencies continue and build on these services in California.
(d) (1) It is the intent of the Legislature that the Commission on
Peace Officer Standards and Training, pursuant to Section 13778 of the
Penal Code and in cooperation with the Department of Justice and other
subject matter experts, provide for regular, periodic, continuing
professional training of peace officers throughout California, and that
this training take place in conjunction, when appropriate, with training
of reproductive health service providers funded by noncommission
sources.
(2) It is the intent of the Legislature that training pursuant to Section
13778 of the Penal Code include information on crimes, including
antigovernment extremist crimes and certain hate crimes motivated by
APPENDICES
13
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
hostility to real or perceived ethnic background or sexual orientation,
commonly committed by some of the same persons who commonly
commit anti-reproductive-rights crimes of violence. Likewise, it is the
intent of the Legislature that the guidelines and course of instruction and
training pursuant to Section 13519.6 of the Penal Code include
information on these crimes.
(e) Nothing in this act is intended to define anti-reproductive-rights
crimes or antigovernment extremist crimes as hate crimes, or otherwise
to expand or change the definition of hate crimes.
(f) It is the intent of the Legislature that nothing in this act, and no
action by anyone pursuant to this act, stigmatize anyone solely because
of his or her political or religious beliefs, because of his or her advocacy
of any lawful actions, or because of his or her exercise of the rights of
free speech or freedom of religion, and that nothing in this act, and no
actions by anyone pursuant to this act, otherwise harm anyone because
of his or her beliefs, constitutionally protected speech, or lawful actions.
SEC. 2. Title 11.7 (commencing with Section 423) is added to Part
1 of the Penal Code, to read:
TITLE 11.7. CALIFORNIA FREEDOM OF ACCESS TO CLINIC
AND CHURCH ENTRANCES ACT
423. This title shall be known and may be cited as the California
Freedom of Access to Clinic and Church Entrances Act, or the California
FACE Act.
423.1. The following definitions apply for the purposes of this title:
(a) “Crime of violence” means an offense that has as an element the
use, attempted use, or threatened use of physical force against the person
or property of another.
(b) “Interfere with” means to restrict a person’s freedom of
movement.
(c) “Intimidate” means to place a person in reasonable apprehension
of bodily harm to herself or himself or to another.
(d) “Nonviolent” means conduct that would not constitute a crime of
violence.
(e) “Physical obstruction” means rendering ingress to or egress from
a reproductive health services facility or to or from a place of religious
worship impassable to another person, or rendering passage to or from
a reproductive health services facility or a place of religious worship
unreasonably difficult or hazardous to another person.
(f) “Reproductive health services” means reproductive health
services provided in a hospital, clinic, physician’s office, or other facility
and includes medical, surgical, counseling, or referral services relating
14 ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
to the human reproductive system, including services relating to
pregnancy or the termination of a pregnancy.
(g) “Reproductive health services client, provider, or assistant”
means a person or entity that is or was involved in obtaining, seeking to
obtain, providing, seeking to provide, or assisting or seeking to assist
another person, at that other person’s request, to obtain or provide any
services in a reproductive health services facility, or a person or entity
that is or was involved in owning or operating or seeking to own or
operate, a reproductive health services facility.
(h) “Reproductive health services facility” includes a hospital,
clinic, physician’s office, or other facility that provides or seeks to
provide reproductive health services and includes the building or
structure in which the facility is located.
423.2. Every person who, except a parent or guardian acting towards
his or her minor child or ward, commits any of the following acts shall
be subject to the punishment specified in Section 423.3.
(a) By force, threat of force, or physical obstruction that is a crime of
violence, intentionally injures, intimidates, interferes with, or attempts
to injure, intimidate, or interfere with, any person or entity because that
person or entity is a reproductive health services client, provider, or
assistant, or in order to intimidate any person or entity, or any class of
persons or entities, from becoming or remaining a reproductive health
services client, provider, or assistant.
(b) By force, threat of force, or physical obstruction that is a crime of
violence, intentionally injures, intimidates, interferes with, or attempts
to injure, intimidate, or interfere with any person lawfully exercising or
seeking to exercise the First Amendment right of religious freedom at
a place of religious worship.
(c) By nonviolent physical obstruction, intentionally injures,
intimidates, or interferes with, or attempts to injure, intimidate, or
interfere with, any person or entity because that person or entity is a
reproductive health services client, provider, or assistant, or in order to
intimidate any person or entity, or any class of persons or entities, from
becoming or remaining a reproductive health services client, provider,
or assistant.
(d) By nonviolent physical obstruction, intentionally injures,
intimidates, or interferes with, or attempts to injure, intimidate, or
interfere with, any person lawfully exercising or seeking to exercise the
First Amendment right of religious freedom at a place of religious
worship.
(e) Intentionally damages or destroys the property of a person, entity,
or facility, or attempts to do so, because the person, entity, or facility is
a reproductive health services client, provider, assistant, or facility.
APPENDICES
15
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
(f) Intentionally damages or destroys the property of a place of
religious worship.
423.3. (a) A first violation of subdivision (c) or (d) of Section 423.2
is a misdemeanor, punishable by imprisonment in a county jail for a
period of not more than six months and a fine not to exceed two thousand
dollars ($2,000).
(b) A second or subsequent violation of subdivision (c) or (d) of
Section 423.2 is a misdemeanor, punishable by imprisonment in a
county jail for a period of not more than six months and a fine not to
exceed five thousand dollars ($5,000).
(c) A first violation of subdivision (a), (b), (e), or (f) of Section 423.2
is a misdemeanor, punishable by imprisonment in a county jail for a
period of not more than one year and a fine not to exceed twenty-five
thousand dollars ($25,000).
(d) A second or subsequent violation of subdivision (a), (b), (e), or (f)
of Section 423.2 is a misdemeanor, punishable by imprisonment in a
county jail for a period of not more than one year and a fine not to exceed
fifty thousand dollars ($50,000).
(e) In imposing fines pursuant to this section, the court shall consider
applicable factors in aggravation and mitigation set out in Rules 4.421
and 4.423 of the California Rules of Court, and shall consider a prior
violation of the federal Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act of
1994 (18 U.S.C. Sec. 248), or a prior violation of a statute of another
jurisdiction that would constitute a violation of Section 423.2 or of the
federal Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act of 1994, to be a prior
violation of Section 423.2.
(f) This title establishes concurrent state jurisdiction over conduct
that is also prohibited by the federal Freedom of Access to Clinic
Entrances Act of 1994 (18 U.S.C. Sec. 248), which provides for more
severe misdemeanor penalties for first violations and
felony-misdemeanor penalties for second and subsequent violations.
State law enforcement agencies and prosecutors shall cooperate with
federal authorities in the prevention, apprehension, and prosecution of
these crimes, and shall seek federal prosecutions when appropriate.
(g) No person shall be convicted under this article for conduct in
violation of Section 423.2 that was done on a particular occasion where
the identical conduct on that occasion was the basis for a conviction of
that person under the federal Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act
of 1994 (18 U.S.C. Sec. 248).
423.4. (a) A person aggrieved by a violation of Section 423.2 may
bring a civil action to enjoin the violation, for compensatory and
punitive damages, and for the costs of suit and reasonable fees for
attorneys and expert witnesses, except that only a reproductive health
16 ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
services client, provider, or assistant may bring an action under
subdivision (a), (c), or (e) of Section 423.2, and only a person lawfully
exercising or seeking to exercise the First Amendment right of religious
freedom in a place of religious worship, or the entity that owns or
operates a place of religious worship, may bring an action under
subdivision (b), (d), or (f) of Section 423.2. With respect to
compensatory damages, the plaintiff may elect, at any time prior to the
rendering of a final judgment, to recover, in lieu of actual damages, an
award of statutory damages in the amount of one thousand dollars
($1,000) per exclusively nonviolent violation, and five thousand dollars
($5,000) per any other violation, for each violation committed.
(b) The Attorney General, a district attorney, or a city attorney may
bring a civil action to enjoin a violation of Section 423.2, for
compensatory damages to persons aggrieved as described in subdivision
(a) and for the assessment of a civil penalty against each respondent. The
civil penalty shall not exceed two thousand dollars ($2,000) for an
exclusively nonviolent first violation, and fifteen thousand dollars
($15,000) for any other first violation, and shall not exceed five thousand
dollars ($5,000) for an exclusively nonviolent subsequent violation, and
twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000) for any other subsequent
violation. In imposing civil penalties pursuant to this subdivision, the
court shall consider a prior violation of the federal Freedom of Access
to Clinic Entrances Act of 1994 (18 U.S.C. Sec. 248), or a prior violation
of a statute of another jurisdiction that would constitute a violation of
Section 423.2 or the federal Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act
of 1994, to be a prior violation of Section 423.2.
(c) No person shall be found liable under this section for conduct in
violation of Section 423.2 done on a particular occasion where the
identical conduct on that occasion was the basis for a finding of liability
by that person under the federal Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances
Act of 1994 (18 U.S.C. Sec. 248).
423.5. (a) (1) The court in which a criminal or civil proceeding is
filed for a violation of subdivision (a), (c), or (e) of Section 423.2 shall
take all action reasonably required, including granting restraining
orders, to safeguard the health, safety, or privacy of either of the
following:
(A) A reproductive health services client, provider, or assistant who
is a party or witness in the proceeding.
(B) A person who is a victim of, or at risk of becoming a victim of,
conduct prohibited by subdivision (a), (c), or (e) of Section 423.2.
(2) The court in which a criminal or civil proceeding is filed for a
violation of subdivision (b), (d), or (f) of Section 423.2 shall take all
APPENDICES
17
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
action reasonably required, including granting restraining orders, to
safeguard the health, safety, or privacy of either of the following:
(A) A person lawfully exercising or seeking to exercise the First
Amendment right of religious freedom at a place of religious worship.
(B) An entity that owns or operates a place of religious worship.
(b) Restraining orders issued pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision
(a) may include provisions prohibiting or restricting the photographing
of persons described in subparagraphs (A) and (B) of paragraph (1) of
subdivision (a) when reasonably required to safeguard the health, safety,
or privacy of those persons. Restraining orders issued pursuant to
paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) may include provisions prohibiting or
restricting the photographing of persons described in subparagraphs (A)
and (B) of paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) when reasonably required to
safeguard the health, safety, or privacy of those persons.
(c) A court may, in its discretion, permit an individual described in
subparagraph (A) or (B) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) to use a
pseudonym in a civil proceeding described in paragraph (1) of
subdivision (a) when reasonably required to safeguard the health, safety,
or privacy of those persons. A court may, in its discretion, permit an
individual described in subparagraph (A) or (B) of paragraph (2) of
subdivision (a) to use a pseudonym in a civil proceeding described in
paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) when reasonably required to safeguard
the health, safety, or privacy of those persons.
423.6. This title shall not be construed for any of the following
purposes:
(a) To impair any constitutionally protected activity, or any activity
protected by the laws of California or of the United States of America.
(b) To provide exclusive civil or criminal remedies or to preempt or
to preclude any county, city, or city and county from passing any law to
provide a remedy for the commission of any of the acts prohibited by this
title or to make any of those acts a crime.
(c) To interfere with the enforcement of any federal, state, or local
laws regulating the performance of abortions or the provision of other
reproductive health services.
(d) To negate, supercede, or otherwise interfere with the operation of
any provision of Chapter 10 (commencing with Section 1138) of Part 3
of Division 2 of the Labor Code.
(e) To create additional civil or criminal remedies or to limit any
existing civil or criminal remedies to redress an activity that interferes
with the exercise of any other rights protected by the First Amendment
to the United States Constitution or of Article I of the California
Constitution.
18
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
(f) To preclude prosecution under both this title and any other
provision of law, except as provided in subdivision (g) of Section 423.3.
SEC. 3. Title 5.7 (commencing with Section 13775) is added to Part
4 of the Penal Code, to read:
TITLE 5.7. REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTS LAW ENFORCEMENT
ACT
13775. This title shall be known and may be cited as the
Reproductive Rights Law Enforcement Act.
13776. The following definitions apply for the purposes of this title:
(a) “Anti-reproductive-rights crime” means a crime committed
partly or wholly because the victim is a reproductive health services
client, provider, or assistant, or a crime that is partly or wholly intended
to intimidate the victim, any other person or entity, or any class of
persons or entities from becoming or remaining a reproductive health
services client, provider, or assistant. “Anti-reproductive-rights crime”
includes, but is not limited to, a violation of subdivision (a) or (c) of
Section 423.2.
(b) “Subject matter experts” includes, but is not limited to, law
enforcement agencies experienced with anti-reproductive-rights crimes,
and organizations such as the American Civil Liberties Union, the
American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the California
Abortion and Reproductive Rights Action League, the California
Medical Association, the Feminist Majority Foundation, the National
Abortion Federation, the National Organization for Women, and the
Planned Parenthood Federation of America that represent reproductive
health services clients, providers, and assistants.
(c) “Crime of violence,” “nonviolent,” “reproductive health
services;” “reproductive health services client, provider, or assistant;”
and “reproductive health services facility” each has the same meaning
as set forth in Section 423.1.
13777. (a) Except as provided in subdivision (d), the Attorney
General shall do each of the following:
(1) Collect and analyze information relating to
anti-reproductive-rights crimes, including, but not limited to, the
threatened commission of these crimes and persons suspected of
committing these crimes or making these threats. The analysis shall
distinguish between crimes of violence, including, but not limited to,
violations of subdivisions (a) and (e) of Section 423.2, and nonviolent
crimes, including, but not limited to, violations of subdivision (c) of
Section 423.2. The Attorney General shall make this information
APPENDICES
19
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
available to federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies and
prosecutors in California.
(2) Direct local law enforcement agencies to report to the Department
of Justice, in a manner that the Attorney General prescribes, any
information that may be required relative to anti-reproductive-rights
crimes. The report of each crime that violates Section 423.2 shall note
the subdivision that prohibits the crime. The report of each crime that
violates any other law shall note the code, section, and subdivision that
prohibits the crime. The report of any crime that violates both Section
423.2 and any other law shall note both the subdivision of Section 423.2
and the other code, section, and subdivision that prohibits the crime.
(3) On or before July 1, 2003, and every July 1 thereafter, submit a
report to the Legislature analyzing the information it obtains pursuant to
this section.
(4) (A) Develop a plan to prevent, apprehend, prosecute, and report
anti-reproductive-rights crimes, and to carry out the legislative intent
expressed in subdivisions (c), (d), (e), and (f) of Section 1 of the act that
enacts this title in the 2001-2002 session of the Legislature.
(B) Make a report on the plan to the Legislature by December 1, 2002.
The report shall include recommendations for any legislation necessary
to carry out the plan.
(5) Make a report to the Legislature in 2005, that evaluates the
implementation of the act that enacts this title in the 2001–02 Regular
Session, any legislation recommended pursuant to subparagraph (B) of
paragraph (4), and the plan developed pursuant to subparagraph (A) of
paragraph (4). The report shall also include a recommendation
concerning whether the Legislature should extend or repeal the sunset
date in Section 13779 and recommendations regarding any other
necessary legislation.
(b) In carrying out his or her responsibilities under this section, the
Attorney General shall consult the Governor, the Commission on Peace
Officer Standards and Training, and other subject matter experts.
(c) To avoid production and distribution costs, the Attorney General
may submit the reports that this section requires electronically or as part
of any other reports that he or she submits to the Legislature, and shall
post the reports that this section requires on the Department of Justice
Web site.
(d) The Attorney General shall implement this section to the extent
the Legislature appropriates funds in the Budget Act or another statute
for this purpose.
13778. (a) The Commission on Peace Officer Standards and
Training, utilizing available resources, shall develop a two-hour
telecourse on anti-reproductive-rights crimes and make the telecourse
20 ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
available to all California law enforcement agencies as soon as
practicable after chaptering of the act that enacts this title in the
2001–2002 session of the Legislature.
(b) Persons and organizations, including, but not limited to,
subject-matter experts, may make application to the commission, as
outlined in Article 3 (commencing with Section 1051) of Division 2 of
Title 11 of the California Code of Regulations, for certification of a
course designed to train law enforcement officers to carry out the
legislative intent expressed in paragraph (1) of subdivision (d) of Section
1 of the act that enacts this title in the 2001–02 Regular Session.
(c) In developing the telecourse required by subdivision (a), and in
considering any applications pursuant to subdivision (b), the
commission, utilizing available resources, shall consult the Attorney
General and other subject matter experts, except where a subject matter
expert has submitted, or has an interest in, an application pursuant to
subdivision (b).
13779. This title shall remain in effect until January 1, 2007, and as
of that date is repealed unless a later enacted statute deletes or extends
that date.
SEC. 4. No reimbursement is required by this act pursuant to
Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution for certain
costs that may be incurred by a local agency or school district because
in that regard this act creates a new crime or infraction, eliminates a
crime or infraction, or changes the penalty for a crime or infraction,
within the meaning of Section 17556 of the Government Code, or
changes the definition of a crime within the meaning of Section 6 of
Article XIII B of the California Constitution.
However, notwithstanding Section 17610 of the Government Code,
if the Commission on State Mandates determines that this act contains
other costs mandated by the state, reimbursement to local agencies and
school districts for those costs shall be made pursuant to Part 7
(commencing with Section 17500) of Division 4 of Title 2 of the
Government Code. If the statewide cost of the claim for reimbursement
does not exceed one million dollars ($1,000,000), reimbursement shall
be made from the State Mandates Claims Fund.
More )
APPENDICES
21
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
Appendix II
More )
APPENDICES
23
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
Appendix III
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APPENDICES
25
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
Appendix IV
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26 ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
29(5
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LEGEND
Codes
Other Asian
Black
Chinese
Cambodian
Filipino
Guamanian
Hispanic
Indian
Japanese
Korean
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L O P S U V WZ X -
Laotian
Other
Pacific Islander
Samoan
Hawaiian
Vietnamese
White
Asian
Unknown
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IC - Individual Client
IE - Individual Employee
IO - Individual Other
Property Type Codes
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R - Religious Organization
H - Health Facility
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❒5(6,'(17❒1215(6,'(17 ❒81.12:1
Property Category Codes
1 - Automobiles
2 - Bicycles
3 - Buses
4 - Clothes/Furs
5 - Computer
Hardware/Software
6 - Office-type Equipment
7 - Other Motor Vehicles
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
- Purses/Handbags/Wallets
- Radios/TVs/VCRs
- Structures-Single Occupancy Dwellings
- Structures-Other Dwellings
- Structures-Other Commercial/Business
- Structures-Public/Community
- Structures-Other
- Other
More )
APPENDICES
27
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTS CRIMES (ARRC)
Data Collection Worksheet (BCIA 8371)
Requirement:
This Data Collection Worksheet (BCIA 8371) should be completed and submitted only if there are ARRCs
to report for your agency.
NOTE: It is the purpose of this legislation to collect data on any crime committed partly or wholly because
the victim is a reproductive health services client, provider, or assistant, or a crime that is partly or wholly
intended to intimidate the victim, any other person or entity, or any class of persons or entities from
becoming or remaining a reproductive health services client, provider, or assistant.
Frequency:
At the end of the month, enter the total number of ARRCs reported to your agency on the Summary
Worksheet (BCIA 8370) and attach a completed Data Collection Worksheet (BCIA 8371) for each ARRC. If
there are no ARRCs to report, submit only the Summary Worksheet (BCIA 8370).
Submit these forms by the 10th working day for the preceding month (for example, July data should be
submitted by the 10th working day in August).
Administration:
Preparer’s Name
Enter the name of the person who prepared the form and whom should be contacted by the DOJ regarding
questions.
Telephone Number
Enter the area code and telephone number of the person to be contacted if questions arise.
Agency
Enter the name of your agency.
NCIC Number
Enter your agency’s ORI/NCIC number. Agencies should abbreviate the nine-character NCIC code by using
the fourth through seventh character of the NCIC code. For example, if your NCIC number is “CA0570100,”
report “5701" only.
Date
Enter the date prepared.
Incident Information:
Occurrence Date
Enter the month, day, and year of occurrence.
Time
If known, enter the time of occurrence in military 24-hour time.
Crime Case Number
Enter the number assigned by your agency used to identify each report uniquely, e.g., the Originating
Agency Case Number.
Total Number of Individual Victims
Enter the total number of individual victims involved in the incident.
ARRC Data Collection Worksheet Instructions
28
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
1
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
Example: The offender shoved an employee at a reproductive health services facility. The offender also
broke the window of the reproductive health services facility. Report “1" victim (the employee) in the “Total
Number of Individual Victims” box.
Total Number of Property Victims
Enter the total number of property victims involved in the incident.
Example: Referring to the example above, report “1" property victim (the reproductive health services facility)
in the “Total Number of Property Victims” box.
Statute (Code Section)Attach additional sheets of paper if needed.
Enter all ARRC offenses involved (up to 10) in the ARRC incident. If there are more than a total of 10 ARRC
offenses involved in an incident, enter the most serious offenses. Record each statute code only once even
though there may have been more than one victim per offense. Report the exact statute (Penal Code,
Health and Safety Code, etc.), section number, and appropriate subsection.
Literal
Enter a short description of the statutory code section.
Level
Enter the level of the code section involved (“M” for misdemeanor or “F” for felony).
Crime of Violence?
For each statute code reported, answer the following question: did this offense involve “the use, attempted
use, or threatened use of physical force against the person or property of another” as defined by 423.1 PC
(see the back of the Summary Worksheet for the statute code definition). If the answer is yes, check the
“yes” box. If it is not a crime of violence, check the “no” box.
Number of Victims/Property
Enter the number of victims for each offense which were perpetrated against him/her during the incident.
Example: During a “protest” an unruly participant refuses requests to leave the grounds of a health facility.
The offender also shoves two clients walking into a reproductive health services facility and then breaks a
window of the building. The offender is arrested for 423.2 (A) PC, 423.2 (E) PC, and 602(N) PC. Enter
423.2 (A) PC, 423.2 (E) PC, and 602 (N) PC in the “Statute (Code Section)” boxes.
ARRC Offense(s)
Statute (Code
Section)
Literal
Level
(M/F)
Crime of
Violence?
Number of
Victims/Prop
1. 423.2 (A) PC
violence/etc: reproductive health
client
M
Yes
2
2. 423.2 (E) PC
intentionally damage
property:repro health svs
M
Yes
1
3. 602 (N) PC
trespass: refuse to leave property
M
No
1
Location Type
Check a location type to show where the ARRC offense took place. If the location does not fit into one of
the categories listed, check “other” and enter the location.
ARRC Data Collection Worksheet Instructions
2
More )
APPENDICES
29
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
If Weapon Involved
Choose up to three types of weapons/force used by the offender. If the weapon does not fit into one of the
categories listed, check “other” and enter the weapon.
Victim Information: Attach additional sheets of paper if needed.
Race
Enter the victim’s race using the race/ethnicity codes provided in the legend.
Sex
Enter the victim’s sex.
Date of Birth
Enter the victim’s date of birth (mm/dd/yyyy).
Victim Type
Enter the appropriate victim type code:
IC=Individual Client (reproductive health services client)
IE=Individual Employee (reproductive health services employee)
IO=Individual Other (individual not fitting the above specifically listed individuals)
Victim Of
For each victim, check the boxes of the offenses (numbered in the statute code section) which were
perpetrated against him/her during the incident.
Property: Attach additional sheets of paper if needed.
Property Type
Enter the appropriate property type code:
B=Business
R=Religious Organization (or building associated with a specific religious group)
H=Health Facility (includes hospital, abortion clinic, family planning clinic, etc.)
OE=Other Entity (represents acts directed at entities which do not fit in any of the above categories)
Type of Loss or Damage
Check the type of loss or damage to the property. For each type of loss or damage, up to ten property
descriptions or property categories (see legend) can be reported.
Value
Report the dollar values of the property which was burned, stolen, destroyed, etc., as a result of the
incident. Up to ten values can be entered to match the up to ten property descriptions. If more than ten
types of property are involved, the values of the nine most valuable properties are to be reported; then, the
total value of the remaining properties which were coded “other” are to be combined and reported as one
total.
Property Description or Property Category Code
For each type of property loss, up to ten property descriptions or property category codes (see legend) can
be reported. If more than ten types of property are involved, the nine most valuable specifically listed types
of property are to be reported and the remaining types of property are to be combined and reported as
“other.”
Suspect Information: Attach additional sheets of paper if needed.
Race
Enter the suspect’s race using the race/ethnicity codes given in the legend. If the suspect information is
unknown, enter “x” (unknown).
ARRC Data Collection Worksheet Instructions
30
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
3
ANTI-REPRODUCTIVE-RIGHTS CRIMES IN CALIFORNIA, 2003
Sex
Enter the suspect’s sex. If the suspect information is unknown, check “unknown.”
Date of Birth or Age
Enter the suspect’s date of birth or approximate age. If unknown, leave blank.
Is this suspect a resident of your locality?
Check the box that identifies the suspect as a resident or nonresident of the locality where the crime
occurred. A “resident” is a person who maintains his/her permanent home for legal purposes in the locality
(i.e., town, city, community) where the crime took place. Law enforcement agencies should base their
determinations of residency on the town, city, or community where the crime occurred rather than their
broader geographical jurisdictions. If the suspect information is unknown, check “unknown.”
ARRC Data Collection Worksheet Instructions
4
APPENDICES
31
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