...

The Honorable Bill Hardiman, Chair Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on DHS

by user

on
Category: Documents
2

views

Report

Comments

Transcript

The Honorable Bill Hardiman, Chair Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on DHS
STATE OF MICHIGAN
DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES
LANSING
JENNIFER M. GRANHOLM
ISMAEL AHMED
GOVERNOR
DIRECTOR
September 21, 2009
The Honorable Bill Hardiman, Chair
Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on DHS
State Capitol Building
Lansing, MI 48909
The Honorable Dudley Spade, Chair
House Appropriations Subcommittee on DHS
State Capitol Building
Lansing, MI 48909
Dear Senator Hardiman and Representative Spade:
Section 1101 of Public Act 248 of 2008 (Enrolled House Bill 5814) requires the
Department of Human Services to submit the proposed use and distribution plan for
community services block grant funds for the 2010 fiscal year. That report is attached.
If you have any questions please contact Susan Kangas, chief administrative officer, at
517-373-7787.
Sincerely,
Ismael Ahmed
c: Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on DHS
House Appropriations Subcommittee on DHS
Senate and House Fiscal Agencies
State Budget Director
235 SOUTH GRAND AVENUE • P.O. BOX 30037 • LANSING, MICHIGAN 48909
www.michigan.gov • (517) 373-2035
STATE OF MICHIGAN
COMMUNITY SERVICES BLOCK GRANT (CSBG)
STATE PLAN
FOR
FISCAL YEAR 2010
MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES
Bureau of Community Action & Economic Opportunity
August 24, 2009
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
I.
Federal Fiscal Year Covered by State Plan & Application ................................................. 1
and Introduction - Federal Overview
II.
Letter of Transmittal to U.S. Department of Health & Human Services ..........................................2
III.
Executive Summary
A. CSBG State Legislation ....................................................................................................................3
B. Designation of Lead Agency.............................................................................................................6
C. Public Hearing Requirements............................................................................................................6
IV.
Statement of Federal and CSBG Assurances .......................................................................................8
V.
The Narrative State Plan
A. Administrative Structure .................................................................................................................16
1. State Administrative Agency......................................................................................................16
2. Eligible Entities..........................................................................................................................18
3. Distribution and Allocation of Funds .........................................................................................19
B. Funding Criteria and Distribution Formula .....................................................................................20
1. Application for Funding (CAP)..................................................................................................20
2. Program Rules/Requirements.....................................................................................................21
3. Poverty Income Guidelines ........................................................................................................21
4. CAA Funding Allocation Methodology.....................................................................................21
5. Funding Agreements and Use of Carry-Over Balances .............................................................22
C. Distribution and Use of Restricted Funds .......................................................................................22
1. Restricted Funds.........................................................................................................................22
2. Recapture and Redistribution of Unobligated Funds..................................................................23
D. State Use of Retained/Discretionary Funds.....................................................................................23
1. On-Going Statewide Commitments............................................................................................23
2. Discretionary Projects ................................................................................................................24
3. Statewide Initiatives ...................................................................................................................25
E. Use of Administrative Funds...........................................................................................................28
F. State Community Services Program Implementation......................................................................28
1. Program Overview .....................................................................................................................28
2. Community Needs Assessment ..................................................................................................30
3. Tripartite Boards ........................................................................................................................30
4. State Charity Tax Program (N/A)...............................................................................................30
G. Programmatic Assurances [Section 676(b)] ....................................................................................30
H. Fiscal Control and Monitoring ........................................................................................................35
1. State Program Monitoring ..........................................................................................................35
2. Corrective Action, Termination and Reduction of Funding .......................................................37
3. Fiscal Controls, Audit and Withholdings ...................................................................................37
4. Assurances .................................................................................................................................38
I. Accountability and Reporting Requirements ..................................................................................38
1. ROMA........................................................................................................................................38
2. Annual Report ............................................................................................................................39
i
TABLE OF CONTENTS
VI.
APPENDICES
Exhibit A
Designation of Lead Agency
Exhibit B
Michigan Economic and Social Opportunity Act – Act 230 of 1981
■ As amended through 2003
■ As amended in 2006 – House Bill 5258
Exhibit C
Notice of Public Hearing – Public Comment Period
Exhibit D
Commission on Community Action and Economic Opportunity
■ Commission Roster
Exhibit E
Organization Charts:
■ Michigan Department of Human Services
■ Bureau of Community Action & Economic Opportunity
Exhibit F
Projected - CAA Funding Schedule
Exhibit G
Michigan Federally Recognized and Historic Tribes and Map
Exhibit H
Designating New Eligible Entities
■ Department of Health & Human Services/OCS IM 42
Exhibit I
CAA Audit Information
Exhibit J
Corrective Action – Termination or Reduction in Funding
■ CSPM Item 501
Exhibit K
CAA Directory and Service Area Map
Exhibit L
ROMA – National Performance Indicators
Exhibit M
Unexpended Funds – Carry-Forward Policy
■ CSPM Item 507
Exhibit N
Environmental Tobacco Smoke Certification
Exhibit O
Lobbying--Contracts, Grants, Loans...Certification
Exhibit P
Debarment, Suspension...Certification
Exhibit Q
Drug-Free Workplace... Certification
ii
I.
FEDERAL FISCAL YEAR COVERED BY STATE PLAN & APPLICATION
The CSBG State Plan covers FY2010 (October 1, 2009 thru September 30, 2010).
INTRODUCTION - Federal Overview
The enactment of the Community Services Block Grant (CSBG) [through the Omnibus
Budget Reconciliation Act of 1981, Public Law 97-35] replaced the following eight
categorical programs and shifted the administrative responsibility to the states: Local
Initiative, Community Food and Nutrition, Senior Opportunities and Services, State
Agency Assistance, Community Economic Development, National Youth Sports,
Housing and Community Development and the Rural Development Loan Fund.
The purpose for which states are authorized to use CSBG funds, as stated in the law, as
amended, is “to provide assistance to States and local communities, working through a
network of community action agencies and other neighborhood-based organizations, for
the reduction of poverty, the revitalization of low-income communities, and the
empowerment of low-income families and individuals in rural and urban areas to become
fully self-sufficient (particularly families who are attempting to transition off a State
program carried out under part A of title IV of the Social Security Act). Major
provisions of the CSBG Act, as amended, include the following:
•
States are required to use the block grant funds to implement programs that may have
a measurable and potentially major impact on the causes of poverty such as: to assist
people who lack adequate employment, education, and housing; to assist in meeting
emergency needs; and to remove obstacles and solve problems which block the
achievement of self-sufficiency.
•
At the inception of CSBG, there was a funding pass-through provision that required
90 percent of the state's allotment be allocated to FY 1981 Community Services
Administration (CSA) designated community action agencies (CAAs), "Community
Action Programs," or organizations serving seasonal or migrant farmworkers. In
December 1981, this provision was amended to include CSA-designated limited purpose agencies (LPAs) which in FY 1981 served the general purposes of a CAA.
Subsequent enactment of the Coats Human Services Reauthorization Act of 1998
amended the CSBG Act to continue the 90 percent pass-through provision to these
existing eligible entities or to newly designated organizations that meet the requirements
as described in the amended Act.
The CSBG Act, as amended, defines eligible entities as being:
(a)
An eligible entity described in section 673(1) that was in effect on the day
before the Reauthorization Act of 1998 (which would include the following –
as paraphrased);
1
•
Any CAA which maintained its CAA designation in FY 1981 (or any CAA
which came into existence during FY 1982 as a direct successor in interest
to) and did not subsequently lose its designation for compliance reasons.
•
Any LPA designated under Title II of the EOA for FY 1981 which served
the general purposes of a CAA and did not subsequently lose its
designation for compliance reasons.
•
Any grantee which received financial assistance under Section 222(a)(4) of
the EOA in FY 1981.
•
Any organization which received an FY 1984 grant from a state which
actually obtained a waiver from HHS in FY 1984.
•
An organization other than a presently eligible entity properly designated
by the Governor to serve a previously or currently unserved area.
(b)
Or is designated by the process described in section 676A of the
Reauthorization Act of 1998 (including an organization serving migrant or
seasonal farmworkers) that is so described or designated; and
(c)
That has a triparte board or other mechanism described in subsection (a) or
(b), as appropriate, of section 676B of the Reauthorization Act of 1998.
•
Procedures are to be established for planning, public participation, applications, and coordination which states must meet in order to qualify for
block grant assistance.
•
States are allowed to use up to 5 percent of their block grant funds for
state administrative expenses.
II. LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL
See following page.
2
STATE OF MICHIGAN
DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES
LANSING
JENNIFER M. GRANHOLM
August 26, 2009
GOVERNOR
ISMAEL AHMED
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Administration for Children and Families
Office of Community Services
Division of State Assistance
Attention: Community Services Block Grant Branch Manager
307 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., 5th Floor West
Washington, D.C. 20447
Subject: State of Michigan - FY2010 Community Services Block Grant (CSBG) Application
Enclosed are two copies of the Fiscal Year 2010 CSBG application for funding effective
October 1,2009 through September 30, 2010. The enclosed plan was prepared in accordance
with the CSBG Amendments of 1998 and the CSBG Program Information Memorandum
No. 114.
Lead Agency and Information for Notice of Award:
Mr. Ismael Ahmed, Director
Michigan Department of Human Services
235 S. Grand Avenue
Phone: (517) 373-2000
P.O. Box 30037
Lansing, Michigan 48909
Fax: (517) 335-6101
Contact Person:
Ms. Stacie Gibson, Director
Bureau of Community Action and Economic Opportunity
Michigan Family Independence Agency
235 S. Grand Avenue - Suite 1314
P.O. Box 30037
Phone: (517) 241-7911
Lansing, Michigan 48909
Fax: (517) 335-5042
If you have any questions regarding this plan, please contact Ms. Gibson.
Sincerely,
cc: Stacie Gibson
Cathy Scarborough
235 SOUTH GRAND AVENUE. P.O. BOX 30037. LANSING, MICHIGAN 48909
www.michigan.gov. (517) 373-2035
DIRECTOR
III.
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
A.
CSBG State Legislation
In 1981, the state policy makers, cognizant of the problems facing Michigan’s
disadvantaged population, enacted the “Michigan Economic and Social Opportunity
Act of 1981" (Public Act 230 of 1981). This legislation was amended in 2003 and in
2006. (See Exhibit B.)
•
The Act created a state agency (currently the Bureau of Community Action &
Economic Opportunity) to administer the CSBG Program, provided for the
designation of community action agencies (CAAs) and prescribed the powers,
duties and responsibilities of the Bureau, a Commission on Community Action &
Economic Opportunity and the CAAs.
Excerpts from P.A. 230, as amended, include: “...the bureau shall serve as a
statewide advocate for social services and economic opportunities for low
income persons...” “The commission shall provide an opportunity for low
income persons to actively participate in the development of policies and
programs to reduce poverty.” “...A community action agency shall serve as a
primary advocate for the reduction of the causes, conditions, and effects of
poverty and shall provide social and economic opportunities that foster selfsufficiency for low income persons...”
•
Eligible Entities/CAAs
Federal law, under the amended CSBG Act, requires that not less than 90 percent
of the funds made available to a state shall be used to make grants to eligible
entities as defined in the Act. The law does not specify the method to be used in
allocating funds to these entities/subgrantees.
In Michigan, the current eligible entities are the 30 community action
agencies (CAAs) which provide services and resources to all of the state’s 83
counties. For FY2010, a minimum of 90 percent of CSBG funds will be passed
through to the 30 CAAs.
■ CAAs and their Mission
Community Action was the cornerstone of the Economic Opportunity Act of
1964 and CAAs were formed as the catalysts to bring about Community Action.
They were created by local communities to develop local solutions to poverty
problems and to enable those communities to address the barriers to selfsufficiency encountered by their low-income citizens. CAAs bring together local
citizens, including low-income persons, to provide the community with a voice
regarding the opportunities that will best help all of their members to be selfsufficient, productive and contribute to community life.
3
In Michigan, CAAs accomplish these tasks through the participation of lowincome citizens, their advocacy efforts, their programs of service and the
statewide support of over 2.5 million volunteer hours each year from their
communities and the private sector. (Based on Michigan’s minimum wage rate
of $7.15/hour, the volunteers hours are valued in excess of $17 million.) With
respect to their increasing vision and role in their communities: They are the
largest service provider for senior citizen programs, operate nearly 40% of all
Head Start programs, are the largest emergency food provider network, are the
largest provider of energy conservation programs, and provide immediate crisis
assistance for families for shelter, food, heat, health care, transportation, etc.
They are also becoming increasingly involved in the development, rehabilitation
and repair of low-income housing.
While the operation of low-income programs is a major CAA activity, it is not
their primary purpose. The CAA is a local decision-maker, linking community
residents, the systematic assessment of local needs, community-wide response,
and service delivery. It is this commitment to our communities and their
residents that distinguishes CAAs from other human service agencies.
Hence, their effectiveness can be measured not only by the services which they
directly provide but, more importantly, by the improvements and changes they
achieve in the community's attitudes and practices toward the poor, elderly, and
handicapped and in the allocation and focusing of public and private resources
for anti-poverty purposes.
The CAAs' mission involves a balance between strengthening communication
and cooperation on the one hand and coming to grips with serious problems and
deeply felt differences on the other. CAAs address critical issues and deal with
unpleasant realities. In performing their role as an advocate for their
constituency, CAAs must carefully choose the issues on which they take stands
and the tactics employed so as to maximize the chances for success.
The overall image of CAAs in the community should be that of a positive voice
for their constituency. In all of their activities, CAAs should strive constantly to
reduce the isolation of the population they serve and to improve communications
with the community at large. CAAs' ultimate responsibility should not be to
simply speak for their constituency but to assist them to effectively speak directly
for themselves. It is the responsibility of CAAs to provide their constituency
with the support and assistance necessary to participate meaningfully in the
affairs that affect their lives.
4
■ Local Participation in the CAA Decision-Making Process
To carry out their mission effectively, CAAs work with three significant sectors
in the community: consumer/low-income, public, and private.
1. Consumer Sector Participation
The consumer sector includes the low-income, elderly, and handicapped.
CAAs' plans and programs must be developed and implemented with the
maximum feasible participation of the residents of the areas and members of
the groups served. Such participation is essential to ensure that community
changes and improvements which CAAs promote are in fact responsive and
relevant to the low-income citizens to whom they are addressed. It is,
therefore, central to CAAs' mission to strengthen the self-help capability of
the consumer sector and to provide it the opportunity and support to
participate effectively--through both the CAA and its neighborhood and
target area organizations, and in CAA or non-CAA programs which affect its
interests.
2. The Public Sector
Regardless of whether a CAA is a public or private nonprofit agency, its
effectiveness depends heavily on its ability to work closely with, and enlist
the support of, state and local public officials and agencies. CAAs shall
inform the state, units of government and appointed bodies, private agencies,
organizations and citizens of the nature and extent of poverty within their
respective service areas. No community can be fully responsive to the needs
of the consumer sector without the active participation and cooperation of its
duly elected or appointed officials. In this regard, it is also essential that
CAAs develop a close-working partnership with MDHS local offices and
local representatives of other state and federal agencies serving the same
population.
3. The Private Sector
The consumer and public sectors cannot succeed without the resources of the
private sector. Therefore, CAAs must enlist the support and participation of
business, labor, religious and civil rights groups, public and private social
service agencies, health and welfare councils, civic and service organizations,
foundations, universities and private citizens.
■ CAA Local Planning Process
In developing strategies and plans, CAA officials must take into account areas of
greatest community needs, availability of resources and the CAA's strengths and
limitations. CAAs must establish realistic, attainable objectives (consistent with
their mission) expressed in concrete terms which permit the measurement of
5
results.
To the extent feasible, CAAs shall coordinate their plans with those of other
agencies and institutions responsible for poverty-related programs and assist such
agencies and institutions in developing their own plans and carrying out their
own missions. While the operation of programs is a principal CAA activity, it is
not the CAA’s primary purpose. CAA programs must serve the larger purpose of
mobilizing resources and bringing about greater institutional sensitivity. This
critical link between service delivery and improved community response
distinguishes CAAs from other antipoverty agencies. Using their programs as a
base, CAAs have become a focal point for increased community concern and
greater community commitment to reduce poverty.
B.
Designation of Lead Agency to Administer the CSBG Program
Designated State Lead Agency:
Michigan Department of Human Services (MDHS)
(See Exhibit A)
Director/Administrator of Lead Agency:
Ismael Ahmed, Director
C.
Public Hearing Requirements
1.
Public Comment [Section 676(a)(2)(B)]: Notices were published in 5
newspapers across the state indicating that the FY2010 CSBG State Plan was
available (posted) on the Department of Human Services website and that
written comments could be submitted through August 4, 2009. (See Exhibit
C - Notice of Public Hearing) The Notices were published in the following
city newspapers on July 8 or 9, 2009:
Detroit:
Detroit:
Grand Rapids:
Lansing:
Marquette:
The Detroit Free Press/News
The Michigan Chronicle
Grand Rapids Press
Lansing State Journal
The Mining Journal
The Notice also indicated that the Sate Plan is available at Community
Action Agencies throughout Michigan.
6
2.
Legislative Hearings [Section 676(a)(3)]: Reviews occurred as follows:
Senate Appropriations Subcommittee
The CSBG program and related appropriations (FY2010 recommended) were
reviewed during the Overview of the of the DHS Budget presentation held on
March 3, 2009, in Lansing.
House Appropriations Subcommittee
The CSBG program and related appropriations (FY2010 recommended) were
reviewed during the Overview of the DHS Budget presentation held on
May 6, 2009 in Lansing.
3.
Public Inspection of State Plan [Section 676(e)(2)]: Copies of the state plan,
including the public hearing notice, were distributed to the Michigan
Legislature, to the 30 Michigan eligible entities (CAAs), the state CAA
association (Michigan Community Action Agency Association/MCAAA)
and the Michigan American Indian Affairs office, within the Department of
Civil Rights.
7
IV.
STATEMENT OF FEDERAL and CSBG ASSURANCES
CSBG Programmatic and Administrative Assurances
and
Other Administrative Certifications
As part of the annual or biennial application and plan required by Section 676 of the
Community Services Block Grant Act, as amended, (42 U.S. C. 9901 et seq.) (The Act), the
designee of the chief executive of the State hereby agrees to the Assurances in Section 676
of the Act A. PROGRAMMATIC ASSURANCES
1)
Funds made available through this grant or allotment will be used:
a)
To support activities that are designed to assist low-income families and
individuals, including families and individuals receiving assistance under part
A of title IV of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 601 et seq.), homeless
families and individuals, migrant or seasonal farmworkers, and elderly lowincome individuals and families to enable the families and individuals to:
(I)
remove obstacles and solve problems that block the achievement of
self-sufficiency (including self-sufficiency for families and individuals
who are attempting to transition off a State program carried out
under part A of title IV of the Social Security Act);
(ii)
secure and retain meaningful employment;
(iii)
attain an adequate education, with particular attention toward
improving literacy skills of low-income families in the communities
involved, which may include carrying out family literacy initiatives;
(iv)
make better use of available income;
(v)
obtain and maintain adequate housing and a suitable living
environment;
(vi)
obtain emergency assistance through loans, grants, or other means
to meet immediate and urgent family and individual needs; and
(vii)
achieve greater participation in the affairs of the communities
involved, including the development of public and private grassroots
partnerships with local law enforcement agencies, local housing
authorities, private foundations, and other public and private partners
to document best practices based on successful grassroots
intervention in urban areas, to develop methodologies for
widespread replication; and strengthen and improve relationships
8
with local law enforcement agencies, which may include participation
in. activities such as neighborhood or community policing efforts;
b)
To address the needs of youth in low-income communities through youth
development programs that support the primary role of the family, give
priority to the prevention of youth problems and crime, and promote
increased community coordination and collaboration in meeting the needs of
youth, and support development and expansion of innovative communitybased youth development programs that have demonstrated success in
preventing or reducing youth crime, such as programs for the establishment
of violence-free zones that would involve youth development and
intervention models (such as models involving youth mediation, youth
mentoring, life skills training, job creation, and entrepreneurship programs);
and after school child care programs; and
c)
To make more effective use of, and to coordinate with, other programs
(including State welfare reform efforts). ['676(b)(1)]
2)
To describe how the State intends to use discretionary funds made available from
the remainder of the grant or allotment described in Section 675C(b) of the Act in
accordance with the community services block grant program, including a
description of how the State will support innovative community and neighborhoodbased initiatives related to the purposes of the community services block grant
program; ['676(b)(2)]
3)
To provide information provided by eligible entities in the State, including:
4)
a)
a description of the service delivery system, for services provided or
coordinated with funds made available through grants made under Section
675C(a) of the Act, targeted to low-income individuals and families in
communities within the State:
b)
a description of how linkages will be developed to fill identified gaps in
services, through the provision of information, referrals, case management,
and follow-up consultations;
c)
a description of how funds made available through grants made under
Section 675C(a) will be coordinated with other public and private resources;
and,
d)
a description of how local entities will use the funds to support innovative
community and neighborhood-based initiatives related to the purposes of the
community services block grant, which may include fatherhood initiatives
and other initiatives with the goal of strengthening families and encouraging
effective parenting. ['676(b)(3)]
To ensure that eligible entities in the State will provide, on an emergency basis, for
the provision of such supplies and services, nutritious foods, and related services,
as may be necessary to counteract conditions of starvation and malnutrition
among low-income individuals. ['676(b)(4)]
9
5)
That the State and the eligible entities in the State will coordinate, and establish
linkages between, governmental and other social services programs to assure the
effective delivery of such services to low-income individuals and to avoid
duplication of such services, and State and the eligible entities will coordinate the
provision of employment and training activities in the State and in communities
with entities providing activities through statewide and local workforce investment
systems under the Workforce Investment Act of 1998; ['676(b)(5)]
6)
To ensure coordination between antipoverty programs in each community in the
State, and ensure, where appropriate, that emergency energy crisis intervention
programs under title XXVI (relating to low-income home energy assistance) are
conducted in such communities. ['676(b)(6)]
7)
To permit and cooperate with Federal investigations undertaken in accordance
with section 678D of the Act. ['676(b)(7)]
8)
That any eligible entity in the State that received funding in the previous fiscal year
through a community services block grant under the community services block
grant program will not have its funding terminated under this subtitle, or reduced
below the proportional share of funding the entity received in the previous fiscal
year unless, after providing notice and an opportunity for a hearing on the record,
the State determines that cause exists for such termination or such reduction,
subject to review by the Secretary as provided in Section 678C(b) of the
Act.['676(b)(8)]
9)
That the State and eligible entities in the State will, to the maximum extent
possible, coordinate programs with and form partnerships with other organizations
serving low-income residents of the communities and members of the groups
served by the State, including religious organizations, charitable groups, and
community organizations. ['676(b)(9)]
10)
To require each eligible entity in the State to establish procedures under which a
low-income individual, community organization, or religious organization, or
representative of low-income individuals that considers its organization, or lowincome individuals, to be inadequately represented on the board (or other
mechanism) of the eligible entity to petition for adequate representation.
['676(b)(10)]
11)
To secure from each eligible entity in the State, as a condition to receipt of
funding, a community action plan (which shall be submitted to the Secretary, at the
request of the Secretary, with the State plan) that includes a community-needs
assessment for the community served, which may be coordinated with communityneeds assessments conducted for other programs; ['676(b)(11)]
12)
That the State and all eligible entities in the State will, not later than fiscal year
2001, participate in the Results Oriented Management and Accountability System,
another performance measure system for which the Secretary facilitated
development pursuant to Section 678E(b) of the Act.['676(b)(12)]
13)
To provide information describing how the State will carry out these assurances.
('676(b)(13)] (This is the Narrative CSBG State Plan)
10
B. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSURANCES
The State further agrees to the following, as required under the Act:
1)
To submit an application to the Secretary containing information and provisions
that describe the programs for which assistance is sought under the community
services block grant program prepared in accordance with and containing the
information described in Section 676 of the Act. ['675A(b)]
2)
To use not less than 90 percent of the funds made available to the State by the
Secretary under Section 675A or 675B of the Act to make grants to eligible entities
for the stated purposes of the community services block grant program and to
make such funds available to eligible entities for obligation during the fiscal year
and the succeeding fiscal year, subject to the provisions regarding recapture and
redistribution of unobligated funds outlined below. ['675C(a)(1) and (2)]
3)
In the event that the State elects to recapture and redistribute funds to an eligible
entity through a grant made under Section 675C(a)(1) when unobligated funds
exceed 20 percent of the amount so distributed to such eligible entity for such
fiscal year, the State agrees to redistribute recaptured funds to an eligible entity, or
require the original recipient of the funds to redistribute the funds to a private,
nonprofit organization, located within the community served by the original
recipient of the funds, for activities consistent with the purposes of the community
services block grant program. ['675C(a)(3)]
4)
To spend no more than the greater of $55,000 or 5 percent of its grant received
under Section 675A or the State allotment received under Section 675B for
administrative expenses, including monitoring activities. ['675C(b)(2)]
5)
In states with a charity tax credit in effect under state law, the State agrees to
comply with the requirements and limitations specified in Section 675C. regarding
use of funds for statewide activities to provide charity tax credits to qualified
charities whose predominant activity is the provision of direct services within the
United States to individuals and families whose annual incomes generally do not
exceed 185 percent of the poverty line in order to prevent or alleviate poverty
among such individuals and families. ['675C(c)]
6)
That the lead agency will hold at least one hearing in the State with sufficient time
and statewide distribution of notice of such hearing, to provide to the public an
opportunity to comment on the proposed use and distribution of funds to be
provided through the grant or allotment under Section 675A or '675B for the period
covered by the State plan. ['676(a)(2)(B)]
7)
That the chief executive officer of the State will designate an appropriate State
agency for purposes of carrying out State community services block grant program
activities. ['676(a)(1)]
11
8)
To hold at least one legislative hearing every three years in conjunction with the
development of the State plan. ['676(a)(3)]
9)
To make available for the public inspection each plan or revised State plan in such
a manner as will facilitate review of and comment on the plan. ['676(e)(2)]
10)
To conduct the following reviews of eligible entities:
11)
12)
a)
full onsite review of each such entity at least once during each three year
period;
b)
an onsite review of each newly designated entity immediately after the
completion of the first year in which such entity receives funds through the
community services block grant program;
c)
follow-up reviews including prompt return visits to eligible entities, and their
programs, that fail to meet the goals, standards, and requirements
established by the State;
d)
other reviews as appropriate, including reviews of entities with programs that
have had other Federal, State or local grants (other than assistance
provided under the community services block grant program) terminated for
cause. ['678B(a)]
In the event that the State determines that an eligible entity fails to comply with the
terms of an agreement or the State plan, to provide services under the community
services block grant program or to meet appropriate standards, goals, and other
requirements established by the State (including performance objectives), the
State will comply with the requirements outlined in Section 678C of the Act, to:
a)
inform the entity of the deficiency to be corrected;
b)
require the entity to correct the deficiency;
c)
offer training and technical assistance as appropriate to help correct the
deficiency, and submit to the Secretary a report describing the training and
technical assistance offered or stating the reasons for determining that
training and technical assistance are not appropriate;
d)
at the discretion of the State, offer the eligible entity an opportunity to
develop and implement, within 60 days after being informed of the
deficiency, a quality improvement plan and to either approve the proposed
plan or specify reasons why the proposed plan cannot be approved;
e)
after providing adequate notice and an opportunity for a hearing, initiate
proceedings to terminate the designation of or reduce the funding to the
eligible entity unless the entity corrects the deficiency. ['678(C)(a)]
To establish fiscal controls, procedures, audits and inspections, as required under
Sections 6781)(a)(1) and 678D(a)(2) of the Act.
12
13)
To repay to the United States amounts found not to have been expended in
accordance with the Act, or the Secretary may offset such amounts against any
other amount to which the State is or may become entitled under the community
services block grant program. ['678D(a)(3)]
14)
To participate, by October 1, 2001, and ensure that all eligible entities in the State
participate in the Results-Oriented Management and Accountability (ROMA)
System ['678E(a)(1)].
15)
To prepare and submit to the Secretary an annual report on the measured
performance of the State and its eligible entities, as described under '678E(a)(2) of
the Act.
16)
To comply with the prohibition against use of community services block grant
funds for the purchase or improvement of land, or the purchase, construction, or
permanent improvement (other than low-cost residential weatherization or other
energy-related home repairs) of any building or other facility, as described in
Section 678F(a) of the Act.
17)
To ensure that programs assisted by community services block grant funds shall
not be carried out in a manner involving the use of program funds, the provision of
services, or the employment or assignment of personnel in a manner supporting or
resulting in the identification of such programs with any partisan or nonpartisan
political activity or any political activity associated with a candidate, or contending
faction or group, in an election for public or party office; any activity to provide
voters or prospective voters with transportation to the polls or similar assistance
with any such election, or any voter registration activity. ['678F(b)]
18)
To ensure that no person shall, on the basis of race, color, national origin or sex
be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to
discrimination under, any program or activity funded in whole or in part with
community services block grant program funds. Any prohibition against
discrimination on the basis of age under the Age Discrimination Act of 1975 (42
U.S.C. 6101 et seq.) or with respect to an otherwise qualified individual with a
disability as provided in Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C.
12131 et seq.) shall also apply to any such program or activity. ['678F(c)]
19)
Section 679. Operational Rule.
“(a) Religious Organizations Included as Nongovernmental Providers.--For any
program carried out by the Federal Government, or by a State or local government
under this subtitle, the government shall consider, on the same basis as other
nongovernmental organizations, religious organizations to provide the assistance
under the program, so long as the program is implemented in a manner consistent
with the Establishment Clause of the first amendment to the Constitution. Neither
the Federal Government nor a State or local government receiving funds under
this subtitle shall discriminate against an organization that provides assistance
under, or applies to provide assistance under, this subtitle, on the basis that the
organization has a religious character.
(b) Religious Character and Independence.--
13
(1) In general.--A religious organization that provides assistance under a
program described in subsection (a) shall retain its religious character and
control over the definition, development, practice, and expression of its
religious beliefs.
(2) Additional safeguards.--Neither the Federal Government nor a State or
local government shall require a religious organization—
(A) to alter its form of internal governance, except (for purposes of
administration of the community services block grant program) as provided
in section 676B; or ``
(B) to remove religious art, icons, scripture, or other symbols; in order to be
eligible to provide assistance under a program described in subsection (a). ``
(3) Employment practices.--A religious organization's exemption provided
under section 702 of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e-1)
regarding employment practices shall not be affected by its participation
in, or receipt of funds from, programs described in subsection (a).
(c) Limitations on Use of Funds for Certain Purposes.--No funds provided directly
to a religious organization to provide assistance under any program described in
subsection (a) shall be expended for sectarian worship, instruction, or
proselytization.
(d) Fiscal Accountability.-(1) In general.--Except as provided in paragraph (2), any religious organization
providing assistance under any program described in subsection (a) shall be
subject to the same regulations as other nongovernmental organizations to
account in accord with generally accepted accounting principles for the use of
such funds provided under such program.
(2) Limited audit.--Such organization shall segregate government funds provided
under such program into a separate account. Only the government funds shall be
subject to audit by the government.
(e) Treatment of Eligible Entities and Other Intermediate Organizations.--If an
eligible entity or other organization (referred to in this subsection as an
`intermediate organization'), acting under a contract, or grant or other agreement,
with the Federal Government or a State or local government, is given the
authority under the contract or agreement to select nongovernmental
organizations to provide assistance under the programs described in subsection
(a), the intermediate organization shall have the same duties under this section
as the government.”
C.
OTHER ADMINISTRATIVE CERTIFICATIONS
The State also certifies the following:
1)
To provide assurances that cost and accounting standards of the Office of
Management and Budget (OMB Circular A- 110 and A- 122) shall apply to a
recipient of community services block grant program funds.
14
2)
To comply with the requirements of Public Law 103-227, Part C Environmental
Tobacco Smoke, also known as the Pro-Children Act of 1994, which requires that
smoking not be permitted in any portion of any indoor facility owned or leased or
contracted for by an entity and used routinely or regularly for the provision of health,
day care, education, or library services to children under the age of 18 if the services
are funded by a Federal grant, contract, loan or loan guarantee. The State further
agrees that it will require the language of this certification be included in any
subawards, which contain provisions for children's services and that all subgrantees
shall certify accordingly.
Signature of Administrator/Director of Designated Lead Agency
Title:
Ismael Ahmed, Director
Organization: Michigan Department of Human Services
15
Date
V.
THE NARRATIVE STATE PLAN
A.
Administrative Structure
1.
State Administrative Agency
(a) Mission and Responsibilities of the Lead Agency:
The Michigan Department of Human Services (MDHS), formerly the
Michigan Family Independence Agency, was designated the Lead
Agency for the CSBG program in 1995.
MDHS Mission & Vision - The MDHS assists children, families and
vulnerable adults to be safe, stable and self-supporting. We will: Reduce
poverty - Help all children have a great start in life - Help our clients
achieve their full potential.
MDHS is Michigan’s public assistance, Child and Family welfare agency
and is responsible for all state and federal public assistance benefit
programs in the state, including: Family Independence Program (FIP),
Day Care Services, Child Support, Foster Care, Juvenile Delinquency,
Adult and Children’s Protective Services, Food Stamps/Food Assistance,
Medical Assistance, Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program,
State Disability Assistance, State Emergency Relief and Employment
and Training.
The CSBG Program is administered through the MDHS’ Bureau of
Community Action & Economic Opportunity. (See Exhibit F - MDHS
and Bureau Organization Charts) The Bureau serves as a statewide
advocate for social and economic opportunities for low-income persons.
(See Exhibit B - PA 230 of 1981, as amended.)
The programs the Bureau administers fit well with the overall mission of
MDHS and include (but not necessarily limited to):
™ Community Services Block Grant (CSBG)
™ DOE Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP)
™ Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP)
[Weatherization services which supplement the DOE WAP and
emergency deliverable fuel crisis assistance.]
™ Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)
[Federal funds earmarked by MDHS for CAAs to provide
assistance to TANF-eligible households.]
™ Michigan Public Service Commission (MPSC)
[Weatherization services which supplement the DOE WAP as
well as support Client Education focused on energy conservation
activities.]
16
™ Also see: Statewide Initiatives, under D. and Leveraged Funds, under
G.
Bureau responsibilities include, but are not limited to:
™ working within and outside MDHS to develop programs and
initiatives that assist low-income families and individuals become
self-sufficient;
™ developing state plans, program policies, guidelines and requirements
and program monitoring tools;
™ reviewing local agency funding plans and applications for
compliance with policy and regulations and developing grants and
contracts awarding funds;
™ routinely providing technical assistance to grantees regarding annual
plans and budget development, compliance with policies and
regulations, discretionary fund applications and reporting
requirements;
™ assisting CAAs develop new program areas with discretionary funds;
™ negotiating and developing discretionary contracts;
™ conducting annual, or biennial comprehensive, on-site monitoring
reviews and reports for each grantee;
™ monitoring, review and approval of monthly grantee/contractor
expenditure reports;
™ providing for ROMA and outcome measurement training activities;
™ compiling statewide data for required grantor reports.
(b) Goals and Objectives:
The goals of the state of Michigan’s CSBG program are to assist
low-income persons and families to achieve self-sufficiency and to assist
communities in reducing poverty. The target population, for direct
CSBG services, includes those individuals and families with incomes at
or below 200 percent of the federally established poverty level. These
goals are to be accomplished by providing support for services, initiatives
and community activities having a measurable and potentially major
impact on the causes of poverty in Michigan.
CSBG funds are used at the local level in combination with a variety of
funding sources. These resources include but are not limited to:
State Resources
9 Michigan School Readiness/Pre-School Program
9 Office on Services to the Aging
9 MI ENROLLS – MAXIMUS (Medicaid Clients, Enrollment in
Health Plan)
9 Emergency and Temporary Shelter Grants (Michigan State Housing
Development Authority)
17
9 State Emergency Services (SER) funds [from local MDHS offices]
9 Michigan Public Service Commission (MPSC) funds [Low-Income
Energy Efficiency Funds providing weatherization services,
emergency heat and utility assistance and energy conservation
education]
Federal Resources
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
Federal Head Start
DOE Low-Income Home Weatherization Assistance Program
HHS Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program
United States Depart. of Agriculture Commodity Food Distribution
Federal and State Housing programs
Community Development Block Grants
FEMA and TEFAP
Community Food and Nutrition
TANF, Food Assistance Program and Employment & Training
Programs
9 HUD McKinney funds
9 Special HHS grants
9 Assets for Independence Act Rural Development Funds
Local, Public and Private Resources
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
2.
United Ways
Foundations
Faith Based Organizations
Local Community Walk-for-Warmth
Local Units of Government
Utility Companies
Local Businesses
Volunteers, etc.
Eligible Entities
The current eligible entities in Michigan are the 30 CAAs which serve all 83
counties in the state. See Exhibit L - Community Action Agency Directory
and Service Area Map which includes the name, address and city/county
geographic area for each CAA.
Eligible Entity Designation Process [676A]
The state will follow the guidelines for designating new eligible entities
found in the HHS/ACF/OCS CSBG Memorandum Transmittal No. 42, Dated
April 10, 2000 - Subject: Statutory requirements for designation priority of
private nonprofit organizations over political subdivisions as eligible entities
in unserved areas. All CAAs have been notified in writing concerning these
designation requirements. (See Exhibit I - Designating New Eligible
18
Entities)
3.
Distribution and Allocation of Funds For FY2010
All figures are based upon an estimated state allocation totaling $25,637,903
(flat funding for FY2010).
(a)
(b)
Eligible Entity/CAA Allocation (90% pass through) ..$23,074,113
•
Distributed to 30 CAAs
¾ 23 Private Non-Profit Agencies (represents 51% of total funds)
¾ 7 Public Agencies (represents 49% of total funds)
•
See Exhibit G - Projected CAA Funding Schedule
Discretionary (5%) ........................................................$1,281,895
These funds will be utilized for various discretionary
purposes including the following (projected set-aside
amounts). Also see D. State Use of Retained Funds.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Allocations to Bring CAA Funding Levels
Up to Minimum $150,000 ……………… $106,925
Native American Projects ........................
128,189
Migrant Services Projects ........................
195,000
CAA T/TA Allocations…. ......................
210,000
CAA Projects and Other T/TA ...............
169,281
Statewide EITC Outreach &
Tax Preparation Assistance.................
450,000
State-wide Community Poverty Forums..
22,500
Note: Discretionary carry-forward funds will also support CAA
Projects and Other T/TA and Statewide EITC activities as necessary.
(c)
State Administrative Costs (maximum 5%) ....................$1,281,895
TOTAL..........................................................................$25,637,903
19
B.
Funding Criteria and Distribution Formula
1.
Application for Funding (CAP)
All eligible entities (CAAs) requesting CSBG funds submit a Community
Action Plan (CAP) in the format prescribed by the state. Projected allocation
amounts, program requirements, plan criteria, and other pertinent data are
distributed annually as a CSBG item update in the MDHS’ Community
Services Policy Manual (CSPM). CAAs are required to include a copy of
their latest Community Needs Assessment [676(b)(11)] (the state
recommends that CAAs conduct an assessment every 3 years). The CSBG
CSPM update is distributed 30 to 60 days prior to the plan submission date.
Since the state is not notified of its allotment until after the CAA plans are
due, the CAA plans address the expenditure of funds as identified in a
“projected” allocation chart. The CAAs amend their plans during the second
quarter of the year based on “final” allocations; the amended plans also
incorporate the CAA’s prior year carry-forward dollars. Carry forward is
identified by the state/Bureau after its September 30 year-end closeout
procedures are concluded.
The state has designated the following program categories/activities that may
be supported with CSBG funds: Employment, Education, Income
Management, Housing, Emergency Services, Nutrition, Linkages with
Other Programs, Self-Sufficiency, Health and Central Agency
Administration. These categories match those included in the annual statewide CSBG-IS Survey report submitted to the National Association for State
Community Services Programs (NASCSP). There are no funding/budgeting
restrictions concerning the amount of funds an agency may plan to spend
under any of these program categories.
All CAA plans must demonstrate a planning process that incorporates
participation of the target client groups, other social service agencies and
coordination with local governments. The work program is reviewed for
consistency with the proposed expenditure plan.
CAAs are given the option of conducting at least one local public hearing or
providing for a public comment period to allow low-income persons,
community organizations and other interested parties the opportunity to
participate in formulating the agencies' community action plans. CAAs
provide documentation in their plans that such a hearing or comment period
was scheduled and maintain a record of all testimony and/or comments
received.
20
2.
Program Rules/Requirements
The annual CSBG Grant Agreements include general provisions that the
CAA must abide by in order to receive funds. The provisions cover issues
such as: audit requirements, insurance coverage, compliance with state and
federal laws and regulations, confidentiality, termination, submission of
board minutes, etc. It also includes the following assurances/documents:
Governing Board Assurances; Certification Regarding Lobbying; and
Certification Regarding Debarment, Suspension and other Responsibility
Matters - Primary Covered Transactions. A signed Agreement must be on
file prior to disbursing funds at the beginning of each CSBG program year
(October 1).
Community Services Policy Manual (CSPM): For purposes of providing
direction to grantees, the Bureau maintains and continually updates the
MDHS CSPM, which specifies policy and procedural requirements for all
programs (CSBG, DOE, LIHEAP, TANF, etc.). The CSPM covers, but is
not limited to: conditions to receive funding, funding formula, definitions,
program policy, client application and eligibility requirements, reporting
requirements, fiscal accountability, performance standards and
measurements, penalties for misuse of funds, appeal processes, affirmative
action requirements and other applicable state and federal requirements.
3
Poverty Income Guidelines
Income eligibility for direct CSBG services will be determined based on 200
percent of the most recent poverty income criterion published in the Federal
Register by the federal Department of Health and Human Services. Grantees
and contractors will follow the income eligibility criteria as updated in the
CSPM. Note: The change to 200 percent (from 125 percent) is consistent
with the provisions in the FY2009 American Reinvestment and Recovery Act
(ARRA).
4.
CAA Funding Allocation Methodology (90% Pass Through)
The funding allocations are based on the following historic formula. Note:
The state uses the income data from the 2000 Census to distribute funds
under item “b.”
21
Funding Formula
(a) A base allocation of $25,000 for each CAA.
(b) Remaining Funds:
¾ 84 percent: Based on each CAA's relative share of the number of
persons with income below 125% of the poverty level.
¾ 10 percent: Based on each CAA's relative share of the excess
number of persons with income below 125% of the poverty level.
Excess poverty is defined as the number of persons with income
below 125% of the poverty level in excess of the statewide average of
14 percent.
¾ 6 percent: Based on each CAA's relative share of the extreme
poverty level. Extreme poverty is defined as the number of persons
with income 125% of the poverty level in excess of 25 percent.
Minimum Funding Level: The state has set a minimum CAA funding
level of $150,000. Therefore, if an agency’s formula allocation does not
meet this level, the state will allocate additional dollars to bring the
agency’s funding up to $150,000. These additional dollars will come
from the 5% Discretionary funds.
5.
Funding Agreements and Use of Carry-Over Balances
Grant Agreements and Grant Awards (Notice of Funds Available/NFAs), are
processed after review and approval of the CAA’s Community Action Plan
(CAP) and receipt of all required supporting documents. The initial awards
are based on the total CSBG funds expected to be allocated to the State for
the given fiscal year. The awards are amended in the second quarter of the
fiscal year to reflect the final/true allocation amounts (based on the actual
State allocation) and the inclusion of allowable prior-year carry forward. An
initial payment (cash advance) is processed after a Grant Agreement and
NFA has been signed by MDHS. Subsequent payments are generated upon
receipt of monthly expenditure reports/billing statements.
C.
Distribution and Use of Restricted Funds
1.
Restricted Funds [675C(a)]
The state has designated the following program categories/activities that may
be supported with CSBG funds: Employment, Education, Income
Management, Housing, Emergency Services, Nutrition, Linkages with
Other Programs, Self-Sufficiency, Health and Central Agency
22
Administration (these categories include programs for youth and seniors).
2.
Recapture and Redistribution of Unobligated Funds [676C(a)(3)]
As stated in the CSBG Reauthorization, “...A State may recapture and
redistribute funds distributed to an eligible entity...that are unobligated
at the end of a fiscal year if such unobligated funds exceed 20% of the
amount so distributed to such entity for such fiscal year.”
Bureau policy indicates that each CAA’s annual grant will be closed out as of
September 30 each year and unexpended funds exceeding 20% of an
agency’s annual allocation will be recaptured and distributed in the following
year. The recapture and distribution process/policy is described in CSPM
Item 507 – Unexpended Funds - Carry-Forward Policy. (See Exhibit M).
Exception to carry-forward limitations for FY2009: To correspond with the
following Federal CSBG Appropriation language, the carry-forward
limitations identified in CSPM Item 507 have been suspended for FY2009
funding. Hence, agencies will be allowed to carry forward their FY2009
unspent grant funds into FY2010.
“... That to the extent Community Services Block Grant funds are
distributed as grant funds by a State to an eligible entity as provided
under the Act, and have not been expended by such entity, they shall
remain with such entity for carryover into the next fiscal year for
expenditure by such entity consistent with program purposes:…”
D.
State Use of Retained/Discretionary Funds [675C(b)]
The state utilizes discretionary funds for three (3) areas: On-Going Statewide
Commitments, Discretionary Projects, and Statewide Initiatives.
1.
On-Going Statewide Commitments include:
¾ Funding set aside, approximately $128,189 for FY2010, for
Native American organizations for program activities to benefit
low-income tribal member and/or Native American households:
The CSBG Act provides certain Native American tribes and tribal
organizations the option of applying for funding directly from the
federal government or through the state.
The State CSBG Office has a long history of collaborating with
the Office of Native American Affairs to directly fund Native
American tribes and tribal organizations and the legislature has
enacted legislation supporting this action. The Bureau will work
23
with the American Indian Affairs Office, in the Department of
Civil Rights, and various tribal groups in the development of
plans for the implementation of programs and the distribution of
state CSBG discretionary funds for selected recognized tribal
groups and organizations. (See Exhibit G - List of Michigan
Federally Recognized and Historic Tribes and Map)
¾ Funding for Migrant Services to provide emergency and
supportive services to Migrants and Seasonal Farmworkers:
Note: In FY09, CAAs could apply for up to $15,000 for a oneyear Migrant Services program with services to be provided
between May 1, 2009 and April 30, 2010. Thirteen CAAs
applied for and received funding. For FY20210, we anticipate
setting aside $195,000 for Migrant Services for $15,000
contracts.
¾ Funding set aside for T/TA funds to CAAs through an allocation
process is estimated at $210,000 ($7,000 for each of the 30 CAAs
will be included in the annual CSBG grant process). These funds
enable the CAAs to seek training and technical assistance through
MCAAA.
¾ Funding is also set aside, included under CAA Projects & Other
T/TA, to support specific CAA T/TA needs as identified by the
Bureau.
2. Discretionary Projects and Technical Assistance:
The state sets aside a portion of the CSBG discretionary funds for
application by CAAs for community and neighborhood-based initiatives
and capacity building projects. This set aside also provides for small
Technical Assistance contracts to meet local needs specifically identified
by the CSBG office.
Discretionary awards will not exceed $20,000 and no agency may
receive discretionary funds for two consecutive years. Discretionary
fund awards require 20% non-CSBG matching funds (80% CSBG + 20%
non-CSBG = 100% of Budget). Of major interest are projects where
CSBG is used:
¾
¾
As seed money to bring in other funds.
For pilot projects, testing projects on an agency basis that
have the potential of being replicated by other agencies.
These funds may also be used for:
¾
Innovative projects that address a community.
24
¾
¾
¾
¾
The development of new, community-based partnerships
directly related to one of the “Family” or “Community”
ROMA Goals.
Projects that support a sustainable system of continuous
quality improvement in agency management and
performance, including client case management systems.
Capacity building directly related to agency goals, staff
development and/or governing board structure, role and
legal responsibility.
Technology needs to strengthen infra-structure and/or
reporting needs (such as financial, client tracking and/or
reporting software, system hardware and training).
For FY09, one technical assistance contract was funded to support
board training activities. This was in response to a need that was
identified during the BCAEO monitoring process. Note: Due to the
influx of CSBG ARRA Funds, as well as the accompanying and
necessary activities related to the CSBG ARRA funding process, it
may not be possible to fund additional FY09 discretionary activities
prior to the end of the fiscal year.
3. Statewide Initiatives:
Funding statewide initiatives is one of the ways in which we can serve as
an advocate for social and economic opportunities for low income
persons across the state. It is the expectation that these funding efforts
will ultimately result in increased services and/or increased CAA
capacity that will be supported with non-CSBG funds in the future.
•
Statewide Community Forums:
Per Public Act 230, the Commission for Community Action and
Economic Opportunity (Commission) is charged with identifying
strategies to reduce poverty and making recommendations to the
Governor, legislature, congress and federal offices. PA 230 also requires
the Commission to convene public meetings for the purpose of providing
low-income and other persons the opportunity to comment upon public
policies and programs to reduce poverty in the state of Michigan. In May
2009, the Commission submitted its first report to the Governor
“Alleviating Poverty in Michigan: Report and Recommendations to
Governor Granholm and the Michigan Legislature.”
In support of their work, in FY08, the Commission held six (6)
Community Poverty Forums across the state. (BCAEO contracted for the
coordination and execution of the forums and for a summary report.) The
Poverty Forums set the tone for Michigan’s first Statewide Poverty
Summit which was held in November 2008 (in FY09).
25
In FY10, the Commission will again convene Community Poverty
Forums for the purpose of public input concerning public policies and
programs to reduce poverty in the state of Michigan. BCAEO will
contract, on behalf of the Commission, for the coordination and
execution of the forums and for a summary report. BCAEO has set aside
$22,500 for this activity.
•
EITC (Earned Income Tax Credit) Program:
The Governor’s initiative in 2004 (Michigan Statewide Earned Income
Tax Credit Coalition Initiative), to promote the EITC (earned income
tax credit) and other tax credits available to the working poor, has
solidified the role and capacity of CAAs across the state to provide free
income tax preparation assistance and to promote and assist low-wage
earners to file for state and federal credits. Inherent in the process at the
local level is the collaboration between CAAs and existing VITA
(Volunteer Income Tax Assistance) coalitions, including becoming a
VITA partner or becoming a recognized VITA site. Currently, over a
third of our thirty CAAs are either a VITA or TCE site and this number
continues to increase.
In 2006, as result of the Governor’s initiative, Michigan enacted a
state-level EITC for low to moderate income working families.
Michigan is one of twenty-two states, plus the District of Columbia, that
have a state EITC. Note: In tax year 2008, the first year that Michigan
workers could receive the EITC credit, refunds were equal to 10% of
their federal EITC amount. For each year after that, it will equal 20% of
the federal credit amount.
The Bureau and the network hope to leverage additional State dollars to
assist the CAAs in their efforts to promote the State EITC and to assist
families in accessing these additional benefits.
As we continue to build on the Governor’s initiative, to promote EITC
and other tax credits available to the working poor, in FY2010, all thirty
of our CAAs will participate in providing free income tax preparation
activities and in EITC outreach and education activities across the state.
Also, with over two-thirds of our CAAs having the capacity to E-File
(electronically file) tax returns, many CAAs can facilitate quicker
refunds. This capability helps decrease the number of our low-income
families seeking out paid tax preparers just because they provide E-File
services.
The CAA network has moved beyond the initial focus of promoting tax
credits and providing no-cost tax preparation assistance. Several CAAs
26
have been expanding their service delivery system and some are
including financial asset counseling. In addition, some agencies have
garnered additional funds for specific services in their communities.
We are pleased with the efforts and accomplishments of the CAA
network and plan to continue financial support (with Discretionary funds)
in FY2010 to support these activities and will work with MCAAA, the
CAAs and others to identify additional resources to support these
activities.
Following is a description of the FY09 EITC activities.
CSBG-T-09 Program (CSBG Tax Preparation Assistance):
• For agencies that did not qualify for free TaxWise income tax
software supplied by the IRS, the Bureau set aside CSBG
discretionary funds to reimburse the cost of their tax program
software.
• We also allocated discretionary funds, contracts totaling $447,000, to
the CAAs to support the statewide Tax Prep Assistance and EITC
Outreach program for the period January 1, 2009 – June 30 2009.
Also, a CAA financial manager provided advanced software training
to the CAA network which was supported with MCAAA training
funds.
Preliminary program reports indicate that over 13,500 households were
assisted with free income tax preparation and tax credit application
assistance. As result, these low-income households applied for state and
federal credits totaling over $7.8 million and were eligible for
overpayments/refunds totaling over $7.6 million. Note: The final
numbers will be much greater after all the CAA program reported data
has been compiled.
For the 2009 Income Tax Year (Activities in FY2010):
•
For those CAAs who have to directly renew/purchase 2009 income
tax software, we are reimbursing this cost up to $917.20 per agency.
We are also setting aside FY10 CSBG discretionary funds, estimated
at $450,000, to support their outreach, education and tax preparation
assistance activities. We also anticipate that MCAAA will again
support additional training to build on the agencies’ expertise in using
tax software, intra-agency networking and E-filing.
•
As queried by NASCSP in May 2006, Michigan is very interested in
working with the IRS to develop statewide free tax preparation and
asset building services for the low-income in our state. Also, since
the capacity to provide free E-File services is only available to
VITAs or TCE providers, we encourage any efforts on HHS’ part in
27
working with the IRS to make free E-File services available to all
CAAs. Not having this capacity is a factor in why some clients seek
out paid preparers as they can secure “instant” refund benefits. We
look forward to any support that can be provided by HHS and the IRS
in this process.
E. Use of Administrative Funds [675(b)(2)]
The Bureau will utilize 5% of the state allocation for the following administrative
expenses:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Salaries and Fringe Benefits for CSBG staff.
Space and communication costs for CSBG staff.
Travel costs: For monitoring visits to 30 CAAs and non-CAA discretionary fund
recipients; for CSBG staff participation and training at national conferences
(sponsored by NASCSP, CAP, etc.) and other relevant seminars and meetings;
for CSBG staff to provide training and technical assistance and to conduct
workshops; etc.
Supplies, meeting materials and expenses, printing and postage costs for CSBG
activities.
Other miscellaneous costs including conference/seminar fees for Bureau staff.
Distribution of a statewide ROMA report.
Activities supporting the work of the Bureau’s Commission on Community
Action and Economic Opportunity, including: travel costs; conference fees; the
cost of consultant and professional speakers/presentations; etc.
Support MDHS and Commission member participation in the 2010 statewide
Community (Poverty) Forums.
MDHS administrative costs allocated to the Bureau.
F. State Community Services Program Implementation [676(b)(2)]
1.
Program Overview
(a) Description of the CAA Service Delivery System:
The 30 CAAs serve the state’s 83 counties through a combination of
central, county and satellite offices and home visits as points of
access for services. Since their service areas range from 1-11
counties, and their funding base and number of programs vary
significantly, each agency has developed a service delivery system
unique to its community’s needs and financial resources. However,
common to all agencies is: their networking, coordination and
collaboration with local public and private emergency service
providers in meeting clients emergency needs; their assessment of
client non-emergency needs and the effective coordination of CAA
28
and local area services for maximum benefit to the client; and the
delivery of services in such a way as to foster self-sufficiency rather
than dependency.
A description of the geographical area served and a listing of eligible
entities/CAAs (grantees) and services areas is included in Exhibit L Community Action Agency Directory and Service Area Map.
(b) Linkages that have been developed to fill identified gaps in services:
[676(b)(3)(B)]
The CAAs actively participate in local networking and planning
organizations, including multi-purpose collaborative bodies, human
service coordinating bodies, continua of care, workforce development
boards, etc. As participants, they take an active role in identifying
gaps in services and join together with community leaders and
service providers in planning and developing methods of getting
services where they are needed.
(c) Coordination with other public and private resources: [676(b)(3)C)]
Since most of our CAAs use a major portion of their CSBG funds to
support the under-funded management costs of their direct service
programs, as well as for central operational/administrative costs (vs
providing direct monetary services with CSBG), the coordination of
public and private resources is one of their most outstanding
characteristics. They coordinate the vast majority of their programs
with public and private resources and have both verbal and written
agreements concerning coordination, referrals, exchange of
information, specific services to be provided, funding, volunteers, etc.
Examples of public resources include: hospitals and health care
providers; law-enforcement and courts; schools and juvenile offices;
local MDHS (welfare) offices; transit and housing development
authorities; public utilities; commissions on aging; Work First and
One Stop centers; Federal grantors; etc.
Examples of private resources include: volunteers, mentoring and
literacy coalitions; child and senior care providers; farm worker and
migrant services organizations; energy and transportation providers;
churches, food pantries and Gleaners; Foundations; Walk For
Warmth, Urban Leagues, United Way, Red Cross, Salvation Army;
and banks and lending institutions; etc.
(d) Innovative Community and Neighborhood-based Initiatives
See item V.D.2. - Discretionary Projects.
29
2. Community Needs Assessments: [676(b)(11)
The CAA annual CAP instructions require that the agency submit a copy
of its latest Community Needs Assessment. The state recommends that
CAAs conduct an assessment every 3 years.
Tripartite Boards: [676B & 676B(b)]
3.
The annual CSBG grant agreements incorporate the requirement that
each CAA/eligible entity shall administer the CSBG program through a
tripartite board that fully participates in the development, planning,
implementation and evaluation of the program to serve low-income
communities. Compliance is reviewed during regular monitoring visits.
4.
State Charity Tax Program: [675C]
Not applicable
G.
Programmatic Assurances [676(b)]
Use of Funds for Stated Purposes: [676(b)(1) & (2)]
The state will ensure the use of CSBG funds for the purposes enumerated in
Section 676(b) by the use of the following means:
•
Publish grantee/contractor plan requirements which include guidelines
specifically setting out the purposes of CSBG funds and mandated plan
elements. Each CAA will conduct activities under one or more of the
following program categories: Employment, Education, Income
Management, Housing, Emergency Services, Nutrition, Linkages
with Other Programs, Self-sufficiency, Health, and Central Agency
Administration (core central staff, facilities, equipment and
centralized functions of the agency). Typical programs and services
vary from agency to agency.
•
Review CAA plans and discretionary contract applications to determine
compliance with the purpose of CSBG funds.
•
Establish reporting requirements, review submitted reports and monitor
grantees/contractors.
Coordination with Welfare Reform: [676(b)(3)]
CAAs’ participation in the state’s welfare reform efforts has continued to
increase. For the past several years, DHS (through the legislative budget
process) has earmarked a portion of its TANF funds to support CAA activities
30
for TANF eligible households. Receipt of these funds require that the CAA
coordinate efforts with their local DHS and Michigan Works! Agencies in
providing case management and supportive services. A number of CAAs are
also operating Individual Development Account programs, which assist
households in moving further along the road to self-sufficiency.
Also, under the 2006 JET initiative (jobs, education & training) – increasing
economic opportunity and reducing poverty through jobs, education, and training
– CAAs are a resource to partner and/or collaborate with local DHS offices and
Michigan Works! Agencies to assist clients with supportive services and, where
available, to play an active role in training activities. Under JET, instead of just
“find a job – any job,” the emphasis is on a comprehensive approach to connect
families with the kinds of jobs, education and training that can help them achieve
self sufficiency.
Michigan’s CAAs are the largest network of human service providers outside of
state government and are playing an active role in welfare reform through their
collective and individual efforts including:
¾ Their common goal of self-sufficiency for low-income households and
collaboration of services with local MDHS offices;
¾ Participation in local collaborative bodies and decision making;
¾ Providing case management and supportive services (such as extended
day care, transportation, skills enhancement, etc.) for Work First and
Welfare-to-Work program participants;
¾ Collaborating with local resources while delivering weatherization and
home repair services in efforts to minimize energy costs for clients and
maximizing their spendable income; and
¾ Six CAAs are also funded by (or are associated with or part of a larger
entity funded by) the Michigan Department of Career Development
which administers the state’s Job Training and Opportunities Funds and
operates the Welfare-to-Work, Work First and Employment and Training
programs.
Emergency Nutrition Services: [676(b)(4)]
The annual CSBG grant agreements incorporate requirements that agencies
provide emergency services as may be necessary to counteract conditions of
starvation and malnutrition among low-income individuals. Note: In Michigan,
CAAs are the largest network of social services outside of state government and
the largest emergency food provider network in the state. Many of the CAAs are
TEFAP (Temporary Emergency Food Assistance Program) and CSFP
(Commodity Supplemental Food Program) service providers.
Coordination and Linkages between governmental and other social services
programs for effective delivery and non-duplication: [676(b)(5)]
31
Most CAAs are participants in the local Emergency Service Provider Network
and/or local Continuum of Care; this participation fosters optimum coordination
of services at the local level.
In addition, the following activities promote and require linkages and
coordination of services across the state: Michigan CAAs operate nearly 40% of
the Head Start programs; these programs require coordination with various child
and family support services and Work First programs. As the largest senior
services provider, CAAs work closely with their local Area Offices on Aging.
As the largest emergency food provider, CAAs coordinate and network with their
area emergency food providers including churches, food coalitions, Gleaners,
Red Cross Food Banks, The Salvation Army, The United Way, etc.
Coordination of Employment and Training activities: [676(b)(5)]
In Michigan, federal workforce development programs are administered by the
Department of Labor & Economic Growth and workforce development services
are administered locally through 25 Workforce Development Boards. These
boards represent the private sector as well as local government agencies,
education, social services, labor, community-based organizations and other
groups affecting workforce development in a community. Through this privatepublic partnership, Michigan’s workforce development system -- Michigan
Works! -- delivers employment and training programs across the state. The
Michigan Works! Agencies (MWAs) oversee a wide variety of programs
designed to prepare youth, unskilled adults and dislocated workers for entry into
the labor force and to help individuals who are disadvantaged or who face serious
barriers to employment obtain the training necessary to get and keep a job.
Six CAAs in Michigan are part of a larger organization, or are associated with
another organization, that is a MWA. These CAAs can provide direct supportive
and referral services to their clients who are eligible for the employment and
training programs offered by the MWA(s). In addition, several CAAs have
entered into agreements with their local MWAs to provide specific services for
low-income persons participating in their education and training programs.
Many CAAs are involved in the provision of transportation, including direct
transportation and car donation, financing and repair programs. Others have
developed programs that provide case management, career training or job
opportunities. CAAs that use CSBG funds for employment and training
activities enter into a Memorandum of Understanding with their local MWA as
required by the Workforce Investment Act.
Coordination between anti-poverty programs: [676(b)(6)]
As established in Public Act 230, the Bureau, within the MDHS, serves as a
statewide advocate for social and economic opportunities for low income
persons. Within this framework, the Bureau shall coordinate state activities
32
designed to reduce poverty…administer the Weatherization Assistance
Program…and to seek additional resources for antipoverty strategies.
The Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) Crisis
component (through State Emergency Relief/SER energy services) is
administered by local MDHS offices and the maintenance component through the
state’s Department of Treasury through the Home Heating Credit/HHC program.
Some CAAs assist MDHS with the SER crisis component (by providing SER
payments) through contracts with local county offices and others coordinate and
refer clients to the county offices for SER funds. Also, CAAs assist clients with
their HHC applications during their yearly tax preparation assistance programs.
In addition to the CSBG Program, the Bureau also administers the state
Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP), funded with DOE, LHEAP and
MPSC dollars, through the thirty CAAs and two Limited Purpose Agencies
(LPAs). The DOE dollars are directly allocated to the state for WAP services.
The LIHEAP dollars are allocated to the WAP by the MDHS’ LIHEAP Program
Office (up to a maximum of $9m per State Statute) based on an amount not
expected to be utilized for SER and HHC activities. The MDHS applies for state
MPSC energy funds for weatherization services and these funds are administered
by the Bureau as well. (See “Additional Leveraged Funds”). The CAAs have
developed referral relationships with their local DHS offices for WAP services
and work with several local and state resources to collaborate and coordinate for
maximum service benefits. Note: As of April 1, 2009, the state’s WAP can
assist households with income based on the higher of 200% of poverty or 60% of
State Median Income.
Note: Due to the expertise CAA staff have gained through the weatherization
program, an increasing number of agencies are moving into state and federallyfunded low income housing programs, rehabbing existing housing or partnering
with experienced housing developers to produce new housing. An increasing
number of CAAs are also becoming involved in housing support services, such
as credit counseling, homeownership training, Individual Development Account
programs, etc.
Additional leveraged funds at the state level include:
•
MPSC (Michigan Public Service Commission)
LIEE (Low-Income Energy Efficiency) Funds for
Weatherization & Client Education:
For FY09, the Bureau, through MDHS, was awarded an $8.5m MPSC grant
which was allocated to agencies for weatherization and client education
activities for the period November 1, 2008 through September 30, 2009.
Note: Agencies also have the ability to develop energy education initiatives
with local schools and some CAAs have done so.
33
We continue to work within the MDHS as an advocate to apply for MPSC
LIEE funds to support the state’s Weatherization Program.
•
LIHEAP (Low-income Home Energy Assistance Program):
As noted above, the amount of LIHEAP funds to be utilized for WAP
services is identified by the MDHS LIHEAP program office (not to exceed
$9m for a fiscal year). In FY08, $3.5m in LIHEAP funds were made
available for WAP services for the period April 1, 2008 through March 31,
2009. In FY09, $3m in LIHEAP funds are available for WAP services for
the period May 24, 2009 through September 30, 2009. The Bureau will
continue to work with the LIHEAP program office to maximize the level of
LIHEAP funding available for weatherization services.
Note: Combined with the PY09 DOE dollars of $16.3m for April 1, 2009
through March 31, 2010, these three resources (DOE, LIHEAP and MPSC)
total $28.3m to the network for state-wide WAP services. This does not
include the additional DOE ARRA funds of $194.7m.
•
LIHEAP Crisis Assistance (LCA) – Utility Assistance:
In January 2009, the MDHS LIHEAP program office partnered with the
Bureau to provide $3m for CAAs to provide deliverable fuel assistance
throughout the state for the period February 1, 2009 through September 30,
2009. The CAAs accepted these funds with the understanding that there was
no allowance for administrative costs. These funds help fill a critical funding
gap and enable CAAs to provide emergency fuel assistance to their clients.
•
TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families):
For FY2009, MDHS earmarked $2.350 million of federal Temporary
Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) funds for CAAs to support nonassistance type activities focused on strengthening families in their
communities. These funds were contracted to the CAAs for the period
October 1, 2008 through September 30, 2009. (However, due to state budget
issues, these contracts were terminated as of June 30, 2009. We expect that
final service dollars will total approximately $1.8 million.) CAAs work with
community partners, including local MDHS and workforce development
agency offices, in identifying needs and coordinating services as they
develop plans for serving these clients.
The CAAs have received TANF allocations consistently since FY01;
beginning with $1.9 million, increased to $3 million in FY02 and reduced to
$2.35 million since FY03. Note: Due to state budget issues, we do not
anticipate TANF funds will be available to the CAAs for FY2010.
34
•
TANF-EITC (Earned Income Tax Credit):
For FY2009, the Legislature earmarked $250,000 in TANF funds to provide
education, outreach and tax preparation services to assist TANF eligible
households with filing for the EITC. Contracts were awarded to non-profit
and community organizations on a competitive basis for the period January 5,
2009 through June 30, 2009. Thirteen (13) organizations were awarded
funds. Of these, twelve (12) were CAAs. Having both CSBG and TANF
funds available allowed these CAAs to expand their outreach and tax
assistance activities.
Coordination of programs and forming partnerships: [676(b)(9)]
The annual CSBG grant agreements incorporate requirements to, at the
maximum extent possible, coordinate programs and form partnerships with other
organizations serving low-income residents. Note: The CAAs have historically
developed partnerships with a multitude of public and private service providers
and describe those relationships in their annual CAP.
Some Examples:
· CAAs partner with their local Continuum of Care provider(s) and MultiPurpose Collaborative Bodies to coordinate services.
· CAAs partner with local faith-based organizations, United Way, Salvation
Army, etc. to identify and pool resources and/or to coordinate referrals.
· CAAs have formed partnerships with other service providers, financial
institutions and foundations while administering IDA programs.
· Seventeen CAAs have worked with the Michigan State Housing
Development Authority (MSHDA) to be identified as Certified
Homeownership Counselors for MSHDA programs.
· CAAs are becoming active partners, or lead agency, in local VITA
Coalitions.
· CAAs are linking up with the newly established “Michigan 2-1-1” system to
identify their agency-wide programs and services. This statewide system
coordinates the link/connection between individuals and families in need
with the appropriate community-based organizations and governmental
agencies. 2-1-1 is the new single point of entry to get information on critical
services available and how to connect with providers.
H. Fiscal Control and Monitoring
1. State Program Monitoring [678B(a)]
In addition to the review/monitoring noted below, all grants, agreements,
contracts and the CSPM require grantees to submit monthly expenditure
35
reports within 30 days following the end of the month. All pass-through
awards are closed out and reconciled after September 30 each year in order to
determine final agency expenditures and allowable carry-forward. Grantees
are also required to submit programmatic reports on either a quarterly,semiannual or annual basis depending on the type of award.
(a) On-site review of each eligible entity at least once during each 3-year
period: The monitoring process is a continuing activity throughout the
fiscal year and the Bureau updates the CSBG/WX Monitoring Guides
annually. The monitoring process includes two levels of review, an
Annual level review and a Comprehensive level review. Each CAA
receives an annual monitoring visit; however, every other year a
comprehensive review is conducted.
Annual Level: The Annual Monitoring Guide incorporates review of
client eligibility determination, allowable costs for each of our contract
programs [4-8 programs], federal and state policies, and follow up of any
prior year findings.
Comprehensive Level: The Comprehensive Monitoring Guide provides
for a more comprehensive review aimed at assessing the overall health of
the agency. This review incorporates areas found in the “Standard
Monitoring Principles and Practices” that was developed by NASCSP.
Therefore, it also covers agency procedures, procurement, personnel
policies, board requirements and functions, staff interviews, coordination
with other local organizations, etc. and lasts from 3-5 days.
Monitoring reports are issued following each visit and include
administrative recommendations and findings, with follow-up responses
required. T/TA is provided, or provided for, as necessary.
Note: Our Monitoring Guides and processes will continue to evolve from
year-to-year based on our experiences, federal and state requirements and
staff training opportunities. We are also reviewing the additional
monitoring needs relative to the FY09 ARRA funds and are in the
process of developing supplemental monitoring criteria to meet those
needs.
(b) On-site review of each newly designated entity after one year of funding:
An onsite review of a newly designated entity would be included in the
regular annual monitoring process or sooner if circumstances warranted.
(c) Follow-up reviews for entities that fail to meet the requirements
established by the State: As noted above, all CAAs are monitored on an
annual basis. Additional visits are made as deemed necessary when
concerns surface regarding financial and/or management issues. Also,
the monitoring process includes review of issues from the prior year’s
monitoring report that were unresolved or identified for follow-up.
36
(d) Other reviews as appropriate: Additional on-site reviews are conducted
when specific concerns are identified that require attention, review,
discussion or T/TA. In addition to the annual monitoring process, staff
from the MDHS Office of Internal Audit division perform periodic
financial management reviews in coordination with, or at the request of,
the Bureau or MDHS.
(e) Audit reviews: All CAA grant and contract agreements require agencies
to follow the audit report requirements in the Single Audit Act (OMB A133 or A-128) and to follow the appropriate OMB financial and
administrative circulars pertinent to their organization structure. (See
Exhibit I- CAA Audit Information, which identifies when the last audit
was received by MDHS and the period covered by the audit.)
CAAs are required to submit copies of their A-133 audits to MDHS
Office of Internal Audit who reviews and issues findings and
administrative recommendations as necessary. The Bureau (program
office) requests and reviews relevant corrective action plans from the
CAAs, prepares necessary MDHS Management Decision Letters and
performs necessary follow-up.
2. Corrective Action, Termination and Reduction of Funding
[676(b)(8); 676(c); 678C]
If the State determines, on the basis of a final decision in a review pursuant to
section 678B, that an eligible entity has failed to comply with the terms of an
agreement, or the State plan, to provide services under the CSBG Act or to
meet appropriate standards, goals and other requirements established by the
State, the State will follow the procedures found in Section
678C(a)(1),(2),(3) and (4) to allow the entity to correct the deficiency
prior to initiating hearing procedures for termination or reduction of
funding. The steps and procedures are outlined in MDHS’s CSPM Item 501
- Corrective Action - Termination or Reduction in Funding. (See Exhibit J)
3. Fiscal Controls, Audit and Withholdings
Fiscal Controls [678D(a)(1)]: Fiscal control and fund accounting
procedures have been established which assure the proper disbursal of, and
accounting for, federal funds paid to the state under this subtitle--including
procedures for monitoring the assistance provided under this subtitle.
Monthly expenditure reports are required of all CSBG grantees/contractors.
All grantees/contractors are required to submit audit reports according to the
requirements of the Single Audit Act (OMB A-133 or A-128) and to follow
37
the appropriate OMB financial and administrative circulars pertinent to their
organizational structure. (See Exhibit I - CAA Audit Information)
Audit [678(a)(2)]: The Bureau is subject to periodic fiscal and program
audits by the state Auditor General (AG) in accordance with the Single
Agency Audit Act. The most recent audit issued by the AG was for the twoyear period ended September 30, 2006. The audit for the two-year period
October 1, 2006 through September 30, 2008 is scheduled to begin shortly.
4. Assurances
(a) Cooperation with Federal Investigations [676(b)(7) and 678D]:
Cooperation will be provided for all federal investigations undertaken in
accordance with Section 678D. This requirement is also incorporated
either specifically or by reference in all grantee master agreements.
(b) Termination or reduction in proportional funding [676(b)(8)]:
No eligible entity funded in the previous fiscal year shall have its existing
or future CSBG funding terminated or reduced without notification of the
cause(s) and the opportunity for a due process hearing [in accordance
with Section 678C(b)]. The procedures for notification and due process
hearings are described in MDHS’s CSPM Item 501 - Corrective Action Termination or Reduction in Funding. (See Exhibit J )
(c) Adequate Representation on the Board [676(b)(10)]
The annual CSBG grant agreements incorporate the requirement that the
agency establish procedures for a low-income individual, community
organ- ization, or religious organization, (or its respective
representatives), to petition for adequate representation if it feels it is
inadequately represented on the Board.
I.
Accountability and Reporting Requirements
1. Results Oriented Management and Accountability (ROMA):
The state will measure performance toward meeting the six (6) CSBG
National Goals utilizing the National Performance Indicators (developed
within the Community Services Network) as well as performance targets
identified at the state level. (See Exhibit L - ROMA/Planning and Reporting
for the National Performance Indicators)
Each CAA will report on the National Indicators, as well as additional State
Sub-Indicators, that are applicable to their agency’s programs. ROMA
38
planning (identifying performance targets) will be included as part of the
CAA Community Action Plan. As appropriate, agencies will apply the
Milestones method for measuring and reporting outcomes.
2. Annual Report: [678E(a)(2)]
For FY2008, the annual report was included in the state’s FY2008 CSBG-IS
(CSBG Information System Survey) submitted to the National Association
for State Community Service Programs (NASCSP). The report for FY2009
will be included in the CSBG-IS report due to NASCSP by March 31, 2010.
This will include:
(a) Performance Objectives
(b) Program Accomplishments and Activities
(c) Comparison of Planned and Actual Expenditures for Prior Fiscal Year
(d) Profile of Participants Served
(e) Statistical Report on CSBG Program Services
(f) Training and Technical Assistance Provided by the State
In addition to the specific T/TA activities to be included in the FY09 report,
please note that: Training and technical assistance is an on-going
collaborative effort between the Bureau, MCAAA and the agencies/CAAs.
This occurs at three (3) levels.
·
Structured training at the MCAAA Quarterly Conferences:
Each conference includes a number of training opportunities, with
training tracks designed to address the needs of the agencies and/or as
identified by the Bureau or MCAAA. Training is designed to address
CAA Executive Directors, Board Chairs and Members and CAA staff.
The training curriculum is designed by a committee that includes
representatives from MCAAA, the Bureau and the CAAs. The Quarterly
Conferences provide for: Discussion, education and/or training on
various subjects, such as Pathways to Excellence, action steps to address
poverty in Michigan, ROMA, Human Resources, Finance, etc.; program
specific updates and training (for example: Weatherization and EITC);
and skills and education enhancement in various areas such as grant
writing, health and nutrition, leadership development, strategic planning,
ROMA planning and reporting, marketing, housing programs, audit
requirements, and other areas too numerous to mention. Trainers include
a combination of contracted specialists, MCAAA and Bureau staff and
experts from within the CAA network.
·
Emergency or Specific T/TA, coordinated by MCAAA: This training is
provided to address specific situations, in response to an identified need
or emergency situation. As each situation is unique, resources needed
may include: peer-to-peer, outside contractors, community members,
staff from other areas within MDHS, etc.
39
·
On-going T/TA provided by the Bureau’s fiscal analyst, monitors and
grant managers: On-going T/TA is provided both during the monitoring
visits and as needed on a day-to-day basis by phone or in person.
Significant problems that are identified as a result of the state-wide
monitoring reviews are subsequently addressed through a structured
training program or technical assistance activities.
40
VI.
APPENDICES
Exhibit A
Designation of Lead Agency
Exhibit B
Michigan Economic and Social Opportunity Act – Act 230 of 1981
■ As amended through 2003
■ As amended in 2006 – House Bill No. 5258
Exhibit C
Notice of Public Hearing – Public Comment Period
Exhibit D
Commission on Economic Opportunity and Community Action
■ Commission Roster
Exhibit E
Organization Charts:
■ Michigan Department of Human Services
■ Bureau of Community Action & Economic Opportunity
Exhibit F
Projected - CAA Funding Schedule
Exhibit G
Michigan Federally Recognized & Historic Tribes and Map
Exhibit H
Designating New Eligible Entities
■ Department of Health and Human Services/OCS IM 42
Exhibit I
CAA Audit Information
Exhibit J
Corrective Action - Termination or Reduction in Funding
■ CSPM Item 501
Exhibit K
CAA Directory and Service Area Map
Exhibit L
ROMA – National Performance Indicators
Exhibit M
Unexpended Funds – Carry-Forward Policy
■ CSPM Item 507
Exhibit N
Environmental Tobacco Smoke Certification
Exhibit O
Lobbying--Contracts, Grants, Loans... Certification
Exhibit P
Debarment, Suspension....Certification
Exhibit Q
Drug-Free Workplace….Certification
EXHIBIT A
Designation of Lead Agency
STiXTE OF M\CH\G"'N
JENNIFER M. GRANHOLM
OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR
GOVERNOR
LANSING
JOHN O. CHERRY, JR.
LT. GOVERNOR
November 14, 2007
Ms. Josephine B. Robinson, Director
Office of Community Services
Administration for Children and Families
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20447
Dear Ms. Robinson:
The Michigan Department of Human Services (DHS) is designated as the lead
agency for the Community Food and Nutrition (CFN) Program, Community
Services Block Grant (CSBG), and the Low Income Home Energy Assistance
Program (LIHEAP). Mr. Ismael Ahmed, Director, Michigan Department of Human
Services, is authorized to certifY any required federal assurances or other
documents associ-ated with the CFN Program, CSBG, and LIHEAP.
All Michigan grant award letters for the above programs should be sent to:
Mr. Ismael Ahmed
Michigan Department of Human Services
235 S, Grand Avenue, Suite 1514
PO Box 30037
Lansing, Michigan 48909
c:
Ismael Ahmed
P.O. BOX 30013· L.4NSING, MICHIG4N 48909
\tl.iV'."I\/V. lTlich i~.'all.r;.-~o\J
EXHIBIT B
P.A. 230 of 1981
As Amended through 2003
AND
As Amended in 2006 – House Bill No. 5258
MICHIGAN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL OPPORTUNITY ACT OF 1981
Act 230 of 1981
AN ACT to create a bureau of community services and a commission on economic and social opportunity
within a state department to reduce the causes, conditions, and effects of poverty and promote social and
economic opportunities that foster self-sufficiency for low income persons; to provide for the designation of
community action agencies; and to prescribe the powers and duties of the department, the bureau, the
commission, and the community action agencies.
History: 1981, Act 230, Imd. Eff. Jan. 12, 1982;⎯Am. 2003, Act 123, Imd. Eff. July 29, 2003.
The People of the State of Michigan enact:
400.1101 Short title.
Sec. 1. This act shall be known and may be cited as the “Michigan economic and social opportunity act of
1981”.
History: 1981, Act 230, Imd. Eff. Jan. 12, 1982.
Compiler's note: For transfer of authority, powers, duties, functions, and responsibilities established under the Michigan economic
and social opportunity act and transferred by Executive Order 1993-4 from the department of labor to the Michigan jobs commission and
continued by Executive Order 1994-26 within the Michigan jobs commission to the department of social services, see E.R.O. No. 1995-1,
compiled at § 408.49 of the Michigan Compiled Laws.
400.1102 Meanings of words and phrases.
Sec. 2. For purposes of this act, the words and phrases defined in sections 3 and 4 have the meanings
ascribed to them in those sections.
History: 1981, Act 230, Imd. Eff. Jan. 12, 1982.
400.1103 Definitions; B to D.
Sec. 3. (1) “Bureau” means the bureau of community action and economic opportunity created in section 5.
(2) “Chief elected official” means a chairperson of a county board of commissioners, a county executive, a
city mayor, a township supervisor, a village president, or his or her designee.
(3) “Commission” means the commission on community action and economic opportunity created in
section 6.
(4) “Community action agency” means an agency designated pursuant to section 8.
(5) “Community social and economic programs” means those programs provided under section 675 of the
community services block grant act, subtitle B or title VI of the omnibus budget reconciliation act of 1981,
Public Law 97-35, 42 U.S.C. 9904.
(6) “Department” means the family independence agency or another department or agency designated by
the governor to receive and distribute community services block grant funds under the community services
block grant act, subtitle B of title VI of the omnibus budget reconciliation act of 1981, Public Law 97-35, 42
U.S.C. 9901 to 9924.
(7) “Director” means the director of the department.
History: 1981, Act 230, Imd. Eff. Jan. 12, 1982;⎯Am. 2003, Act 123, Imd. Eff. July 29, 2003.
400.1104 Definitions; E to S.
Sec. 4. (1) “Executive director” means the chief administrator of the bureau.
(2) “Low income person” means a person who is a member of a household that has a gross annual income
that is equal to or less than the poverty standard for the same size household.
(3) “Poverty standard” means the federal poverty guidelines published annually in the federal register by
the United States department of health and human services under its authority to revise the poverty line under
section 673(2) of subtitle B of title VI of the omnibus budget reconciliation act of 1981, Public Law 97-35, 42
U.S.C. 9902.
(4) “Service area” means the geographical area served by a community action agency.
(5) “State program budget” means state funds, federal block grants, and federal categorical grants that the
legislature appropriates annually for community social and economic programs.
History: 1981, Act 230, Imd. Eff. Jan. 12, 1982;⎯Am. 2003, Act 123, Imd. Eff. July 29, 2003.
400.1105 Bureau of community action; creation; appointment of executive director; powers
and duties of bureau.
Rendered Wednesday, April 06, 2005
Page 1
Michigan Compiled Laws Complete Through PA 4 of 2005 Regular Session
© Legislative Council, State of Michigan Courtesy of www.legislature.mi.gov
Sec. 5. The bureau of community action and economic opportunity is created within the department. The
director shall appoint an executive director who is a member of the state classified service or the state career
executive service, as established and approved by the civil service commission. Under the supervision of the
department, the bureau shall serve as a statewide advocate for social and economic opportunities for low
income persons and shall do all of the following:
(a) Coordinate state activities designed to reduce poverty and implement community social and economic
programs.
(b) Cooperate with agencies of the state and federal government and other public agencies, nonprofit
private agencies, and nonprofit organizations in reducing poverty and implementing community social and
economic programs.
(c) Receive and expend funds for any purpose authorized by this act.
(d) Provide assistance to units of local government for the purpose of establishing and operating a
community action agency.
(e) Designate community action agencies pursuant to section 8.
(f) Provide technical assistance to community action agencies to improve program planning, program
development, administration, and the mobilization of public and private resources. In implementing this
subdivision, the department shall contract, when warranted by geographical and other factors or when
warranted to meet the requirements of section 15, with public agencies, nonprofit private agencies, or
nonprofit organizations.
(g) Enter into necessary contracts with community action agencies for the purpose of coordinating
community social and economic programs and other programs and services designated by the bureau and for
which funding is appropriated by the legislature.
(h) Contract with public agencies, nonprofit private agencies, or nonprofit organizations for demonstration
programs and other services necessary to implement this act.
(i) Conduct performance assessments of the activities and programs of community action agencies.
(j) Establish, in cooperation with community action agencies, an educational and public information
program designed to increase public awareness regarding the nature and extent of poverty in this state and
regarding existing community social and economic programs.
(k) Evaluate state statutes and programs relevant to the reduction of poverty and recommend appropriate
changes to the governor and the legislature.
(l) Submit reports to the governor, the legislature, the state congressional delegation, and other appropriate
federal officials regarding the needs, problems, opportunities, and contributions of low income persons; the
effectiveness of existing state or federal policies and programs; and recommended actions to improve
economic and social opportunities for low income persons.
(m) Administer the weatherization assistance program created pursuant to 10 C.F.R. part 440. The bureau
shall administer the weatherization assistance program in a manner that provides that public agencies,
nonprofit private agencies, and nonprofit organizations are eligible and shall have the opportunity for funding
for each portion of a program that a community action agency may undertake.
(n) Serve as an advocate within the executive branch to remove administrative barriers to self-sufficiency
services and to seek additional resources for antipoverty strategies.
History: 1981, Act 230, Imd. Eff. Jan. 12, 1982;⎯Am. 2003, Act 123, Imd. Eff. July 29, 2003.
400.1106 Commission on community action and economic opportunity; creation;
appointment, qualifications, and terms of members; chairperson; executive secretary;
vacancies; per diem compensation; reimbursement of expenses; quorum; commission
action; meetings.
Sec. 6. (1) A commission on community action and economic opportunity is created within the department.
The commission shall provide an opportunity for low income persons to actively participate in the
development of policies and programs to reduce poverty.
(2) The commission shall consist of 6 to 15 members appointed by the governor by and with the advice
and consent of the senate. The commission shall be comprised of equal numbers of elected public officials,
private sector members, and low income individuals or as nearly equal in number as possible. At least 1/3 of
the commission members shall be community action agency representatives as either staff or board members.
The governor shall designate the chairperson of the commission. The chairperson shall serve at the will of the
governor. The executive director or designee of the commission shall serve as executive secretary to the
commission.
(3) The term of office of each member shall be 3 years. Vacancies on the commission shall be filled in the
same manner as the original appointment for the remainder of the unexpired term.
(4) A member of the commission may receive per diem compensation and reimbursement of actual and
necessary expenses while acting as an official representative of the commission. The per diem compensation
of the commission and the schedule for reimbursement of expenses shall be established annually by the
legislature.
(5) A majority of the commission constitutes a quorum. Except as otherwise provided by rule, action may
be taken by the commission by vote of a majority of the members present at a meeting. The commission shall
meet not less than 4 times a year. A meeting of the commission may be held anywhere within this state.
History: 1981, Act 230, Imd. Eff. Jan. 12, 1982;⎯Am. 2003, Act 123, Imd. Eff. July 29, 2003.
400.1107 Duties of commission.
Sec. 7. The commission shall serve as a statewide forum concerning state policies and programs to reduce
poverty and to address the needs and concerns of low income people in this state. The commission shall do all
of the following:
(a) Convene a state forum every 2 years that includes representatives from the public, private, nonprofit,
and low income sectors to analyze poverty trends and make recommendations to reduce poverty.
(b) Convene public meetings to provide low income and other persons the opportunity to comment upon
public policies and programs to reduce poverty.
(c) Advise the executive director concerning the designation or recision of a designation of a community
action agency.
(d) Review and comment upon the annual program budget request before its submittal to the governor and
the legislature pursuant to section 10.
(e) Advise the governor, the legislature, the state congressional delegation, and other appropriate federal
officials of the nature and extent of poverty in the state and make recommendations concerning needed
changes in state and federal policies and programs.
(f) Advise the director and the governor at least annually concerning the performance of the bureau in
fulfilling its requirements as prescribed by this act.
(g) Participate with the bureau to implement a public education program designated to increase public
awareness regarding the nature and extent of poverty in this state.
(h) Receive reports from the bureau on strategies to reduce poverty and make recommendations based on
those reports to the governor.
(i) In coordination with community action agencies and the commission, establish an education and public
information program designed to increase public awareness regarding the nature and extent of poverty in this
state and regarding existing community social and economic programs.
(j) Evaluate state statutes and programs relevant to the reduction of poverty and recommend appropriate
changes to the governor and the legislature.
(k) Submit reports to the governor, the legislature, the congressional delegation, and other appropriate
federal officials regarding the needs, problems, opportunities, and contributions of low income persons and
the effectiveness of existing state and federal policies and programs, and recommend actions to improve
economic and social opportunities for low income persons.
History: 1981, Act 230, Imd. Eff. Jan. 12, 1982;⎯Am. 2003, Act 123, Imd. Eff. July 29, 2003.
400.1108 Designating or rescinding designation of community action agency; procedures;
continuation of community action agency designated by community services
administration; rescission of designation.
Sec. 8. (1) Except as required to meet the requirements of section 15, the executive director shall designate
community action agencies to fulfill the requirements of this act in the service areas governed by 1 or more
units of local government. A community action agency designated by the executive director may be 1 of the
following:
(a) A public office or agency of a unit of local government that is designated as a community action
agency by the chief elected official of that unit of government.
(b) A public office or agency that is designated as a community action agency by the chief elected officials
of a combination of 2 or more units of local government.
(c) A nonprofit private agency serving 1 or more units of local government approved by the chief elected
official of the unit of local government that includes the service area, or if more than 1 unit of local
government is included in the service area, by the chief elected officials of the county or counties in which the
local governments are located and of at least 2/3 of the cities, villages, and townships in the service area that
have a population of not less than 100,000.
(d) A public or private nonprofit agency designated by 1 or more native American tribal governments that
have been established pursuant to state or federal law.
(2) Before designating or rescinding the designation of a community action agency, the executive director
shall do all of the following:
(a) Consult with the director.
(b) Consult with the chief elected official of each county and of each city, village, or township with a
population of not less than 100,000 within the existing or proposed service area.
(c) Hold at least 1 public meeting in the service area to provide low income and other citizens living within
the service area the opportunity to review and comment upon the strengths and weaknesses of the existing or
proposed community action agency.
(d) Consult with and obtain the advice of the commission on the proposed action.
(3) Notwithstanding subsections (1) and (2), each community action agency that has been designated by
the community services administration pursuant to the economic opportunity act of 1964, Public Law 88-452,
78 Stat. 508, and that is in operation on the effective date of the 2003 amendatory act that amended this
section shall continue as a community action agency.
(4) The executive director may rescind the designation of a community action agency for cause. In
implementing this subsection, the executive director shall follow the procedures set forth in subsection (2) and
the procedures set forth in the community services block grant act, subtitle B of the omnibus budget
reconciliation act of 1981, Public Law 97-35, 42 U.S.C. 9901 to 9924.
History: 1981, Act 230, Imd. Eff. Jan. 12, 1982;⎯Am. 2003, Act 123, Imd. Eff. July 29, 2003.
400.1109 Community action agency; duties; permissible activities.
Sec. 9. A community action agency shall serve as a primary advocate for the reduction of the causes,
conditions, and effects of poverty and shall provide social and economic opportunities that foster
self-sufficiency for low income persons. A community action agency may engage in activities necessary to
fulfill the intent of this act, including, but not limited to, the following:
(a) Informing this state, units of local government, private agencies and organizations, and citizens of the
nature and extent of poverty within the service area.
(b) Developing, administering, and operating community social and economic programs to reduce poverty
within the service area.
(c) Providing a range of services and activities having a measurable and potentially major impact on causes
of poverty in the community or in the service areas of the community.
(d) Providing activities designed to assist low income participants, including the elderly poor, to secure and
retain meaningful employment; to attain an adequate education; to make better use of available income; to
obtain and maintain adequate housing and a suitable living environment; to obtain emergency assistance
through loans or grants to meet immediate and urgent individual and family needs, including the need for
health services, nutritious food, housing, and employment-related assistance; to remove obstacles and solve
problems which block the achievement of self-sufficiency; to achieve greater participation in the affairs of the
community; and to make more effective use of other programs related to the purposes of this section.
(e) Providing on an emergency basis for the provision of supplies and services, nutritious food items, and
related services necessary to counteract conditions of starvation and malnutrition among the poor.
(f) Providing and establishing linkages between governmental and other social services programs to assure
the effective delivery of services to low income individuals.
(g) To encourage the use of entities in the private sector of the community in efforts to reduce poverty.
(h) Conducting pilot and demonstration projects with innovative approaches to reduce poverty, improve
services, and utilize resources.
(i) Providing and advocating for training and technical assistance to public and private agencies,
community groups, and units of local government to better define human problems, to improve services, and
to facilitate citizen participation, including that of low income persons.
(j) Increasing interagency coordination and cooperation in serving low income persons. If possible,
community action agencies shall enter into partnership and collaboration with other organizations to meet
economic self-sufficiency goals.
(k) Entering into contracts with federal, state, and local public and private agencies and organizations as
necessary to carry out the purposes of this act.
(l) Mobilizing federal, state, and local public and private financial resources and material and volunteer
resources to reduce poverty and increase social and economic opportunities.
(m) Mobilizing community involvement from private and nonprofit sectors, including, but not limited to,
businesses, economic and job development organizations, nonprofit faith-based communities, technical
colleges and institutions of higher education, and the public sector, including, but not limited to, townships,
cities, counties, and this state to address issues of poverty. Community action agencies shall coordinate with
welfare-to-work strategies and implement strategies that increase household income and assets that lead to
long-term economic self-sufficiency.
(n) Serving populations with barriers to self-sufficiency such as individuals and families with low incomes,
senior citizens, young children, homeless persons, physically and developmentally disabled persons, low
wage workers, and adults without literacy skills or basic education or adequate skills needed for the
workplace.
(o) Engaging in any other activity necessary to fulfill the intent of this act.
History: 1981, Act 230, Imd. Eff. Jan. 12, 1982;⎯Am. 2003, Act 123, Imd. Eff. July 29, 2003.
400.1110 Distribution of funds.
Sec. 10. Distribution of funds to community action agencies shall meet federal requirements.
History: 1981, Act 230, Imd. Eff. Jan. 12, 1982;⎯Am. 2003, Act 123, Imd. Eff. July 29, 2003.
400.1111 Community action agency; establishment of governing board of directors;
qualifications and selection of members.
Sec. 11. A community action agency shall establish a governing board of directors that consists of the
following:
(a) One-third are elected public officials. An elected public official may act through his or her
representative.
(b) One-third of the members are low income, elderly, or consumers with disabilities.
(c) One-third of the members represent the private sector, including representatives of business and
industry, agriculture, labor, and religious and civic organizations.
History: 1981, Act 230, Imd. Eff. Jan. 12, 1982;⎯Am. 1998, Act 76, Imd. Eff. May 4, 1998;⎯Am. 2003, Act 123, Imd. Eff. July 29,
2003.
400.1112 Repealed. 2003, Act 123, Imd. Eff. July 29, 2003.
Compiler's note: The repealed section pertained to establishment of board of directors for community action agency.
400.1113 Interagency agreements; purpose; renewal.
Sec. 13. The bureau shall develop interagency agreements with agencies of other departments providing
services to low income persons. The agreements shall specify methods of interagency planning and
coordination of services. The agreements shall be renewed annually.
History: 1981, Act 230, Imd. Eff. Jan. 12, 1982.
400.1114 Conducting business at public meeting; notice; availability of writings to public.
Sec. 14. (1) The business which the commission, a community action agency board of directors, or a
community action agency advisory board may perform shall be conducted at a public meeting held in
compliance with Act No. 267 of the Public Acts of 1976, as amended, being sections 15.261 to 15.275 of the
Michigan Compiled Laws. Public notice of the time, date, and place of the meeting shall be given in the
manner required by Act No. 267 of the Public Acts of 1976, as amended.
(2) A writing prepared, owned, used, in the possession of, or retained by the commission, the bureau, the
department, or a community action agency created pursuant to this act in the performance of an official
function shall be made available to the public in compliance with Act No. 442 of the Public Acts of 1976, as
amended, being sections 15.231 to 15.246 of the Michigan Compiled Laws.
History: 1981, Act 230, Imd. Eff. Jan. 12, 1982.
400.1115 Existing agencies and organizations performing services described in act;
eligibility to receive funds; continuation of services.
Sec. 15. A public agency, nonprofit private agency, or nonprofit organization in existence and performing
1 or more of the services described in this act for which federal or state funds were expended, if eligible to
receive the funds, shall receive those funds to enable the public agency, nonprofit private agency, or nonprofit
organization to continue to perform those services.
History: 1981, Act 230, Imd. Eff. Jan. 12, 1982.
400.1116 Rules.
Sec. 16. The department shall promulgate rules to implement this act pursuant to the administrative
procedures act of 1969, Act No. 306 of the Public Acts of 1969, as amended, being sections 24.201 to 24.315
of the Michigan Compiled Laws. The department shall consult with and receive the advice of the commission
before promulgating a rule under this act.
History: 1981, Act 230, Imd. Eff. Jan. 12, 1982.
400.1117 Effectiveness report.
Sec. 17. Before January 1, 1986, the department shall submit to the senate and house committees that have
the responsibility for labor matters a report covering the effectiveness of the bureau, the commission, and the
community action agencies in reducing poverty and promoting social and economic opportunities for low
income persons under this act.
History: 1981, Act 230, Imd. Eff. Jan. 12, 1982.
400.1118 Appropriation of funds from general fund not required; condition.
Sec. 18. The legislature shall not be required to appropriate funds from the general fund for the continued
performance of the provisions of this act, if federal funding for coordinating community social and economic
programs and other programs and services as designated by the bureau and funded by the community
development block grant is eliminated.
History: 1981, Act 230, Imd. Eff. Jan. 12, 1982.
400.1119 Proposed use and distribution of funds provided under omnibus budget
reconciliation act of 1981; public hearings; approval or disapproval of bureau plan.
Sec. 19. The legislature shall conduct public hearings on the proposed use and distribution of funds to be
provided pursuant to section 675 of the omnibus budget reconciliation act of 1981, 42 U.S.C. 9902, and shall
approve or disapprove by concurrent resolution adopted by a majority of the members elected and serving in
each house the bureau's plan for distribution of funds.
History: 1981, Act 230, Imd. Eff. Jan. 12, 1982.
400.1120 Repealed. 2003, Act 123, Imd. Eff. July 29, 2003.
Compiler's note: The repealed section pertained to effective date of act.
Rendered Wednesday, April 06, 2005
Page 6
Michigan Compiled Laws Complete Through PA 4 of 2005 Regular Session
© Legislative Council, State of Michigan Courtesy of www.legislature.mi.gov
EXHIBIT C
Notice of Public Hearing
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
Michigan Department of Human Services announces the availability of the Fiscal Year 2010
Community Services Block Grant (CSBG) State lan, Low Income Home Energy Assistance
Program (LIHEAP) State Plan, and the Title XX social Services Block Grant (SSBG) State Plan.
The CSBG state plan is posted on the DHS Web site at www.michigan.gov/dhs, under News,
Publications & Information. It is also available for review at Community Action Agency offices
throughout Michigan. Written comments on the CSBG state plan will be accepted through
August 4, 2009 and should be sent to Stacie Gibson, Director, Bureau of Community Action and
Economic Opportunity, Department of Human, Suite 1314, PO Box 30037, Lansing, MI 48909
or by fax to 517-335-5042.
The SSBG state plan is available for public review on the DHS Web site during July 2009.
Comments on the SSBG state plan may be posted to the electronic mailbox ([email protected]) designated for this purpose.
In accordance with federal requirements, the LIHEAP state plan and Title XX report are
available for review and comment at local DHS offices through the state. Comments on the
SSBG and LIHEAP state plans will be received from July 14-31, 2009.
Public hearings for LIHEAP will be held July 21, 2009 from 10 a.m.-Noon at the Grant tower,
s35 S. Grand Ave., Room 1A, Lansing, Michigan; and on July 23, 2009 from 10 a.m.-Noon at
Cadillac Place, Conference Room L-150, 3040 W. Grand Blvd., Detroit Michigan. Written
commends may be submitted to: Ismael Ahmed, Director, Michigan Department of Human
Services. P.O. Box 30037, Lansing, MI 48909
EXHIBIT D
Commission on Community Action & Economic Opportunity
Member Roster
The Commission on Community Action and Economic Opportunity
Mr. John K. Stephenson, Chairperson
Appointments or Reappointments Effective June 21, 2009
Member
Term Expires
Represents Public Sector
Karol J. Bolton, of Adrian
June 21, 2011
Lenawee County Commissioner
Member
Term Expires
Sheilah P. Clay, of Farmington Hills
June 21, 2011
Sonia M. Harb, of Dearborn
June 21, 2011
Daniel J. Piepszowski, of Detroit
June 21, 2011
Represents Private Sector
President and Chief Executive Officer,
Neighborhood Service Organization (NSO)
Senior Director
Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services (ACCESS)
Senior Director, Community Leadership Development
Detroit Regional Chamber of Commerce
Member
Term Expires
William J. Dubord, of Escanaba
June 21, 2011
Gary W. Gilbert, of Mecosta
June 21, 2011
Donald E. Jones, of Pleasant Ridge
June 21, 2011
Alexandria F. Kiel, of Detroit
June 21, 2011
Represents Community Action Agency or Low Income Sector
Executive Director, Menominee-Delta-Schoolcraft
Community Action Agency & Human Resource Authority
Special Projects Director
Mid Michigan Community Action Agency
Director of Resource Development,
Oakland-Livingston Human Services Agency
Consumer/Student
Chief Executive Officer,
Marsha A. Kreucher, of Jackson
June 21, 2011
Community Action Agency of Jackson, Lenawee, Hillsdale
Executive Director,
John K. Stephenson, of Interlochen
June 21, 2011
Northwest Michigan Community Action Agency
<The Commission on CA&EO provides an opportunity for low-income persons to actively participate in the policies and programs to reduce poverty.
<At least 1/3 of Commission members shall be CAA representatives as either staff or Board members.
<Appointments are subject to Article V. Sec. 6 of the Michigan State Constitution of 1963.
documents/Commission on CA&EO/Roster-Appointments 6/21/09
EXHIBIT E
Organization Charts
Michigan Department of Human Services
and
Bureau of Community Action & Economic Opportunity
Early Childhood
Investment Corporation
Judy Samelson
517-371-9000
Michigan Community
Service Commission
Musette Michael
517-335-4295
Office of Communications
Edward Woods III
37394
Legislative & Liaison Services
Dawn Pline
53482
Refugee Services
Al Horn
17824
DHS Director
Ismael Ahmed
32000
Chief Deputy Director
Stanley M. Stewart
37500
Bureau of
Community Action
Stacie Gibson
38896
Bureau of Children and
Adult Licensing
Jim Gale
15462
Deputy for Field Operations
Terry A. Salacina, Acting
33570
Kathryne A. O’Grady
19859
Child Welfare
Improvement Bureau
Terri Gilbert
56158
Bureau of Child Welfare
Suzanne Stiles-Burke
Acting
56158
Child Welfare Training
Institute
Carol Siemon
54416
Children's Trust Fund
Paul Shaheen, Interim
34320
Migrant Affairs
Marcelina Trevino-Savala
33567
Native American Affairs
Stacey Tadgerson
57782
Deputy for
Children’s Services
Bureau of
Juvenile Justice
John Evans
53489
Interagency &
Community Services
Jocelyn Vanda
54727
Bureau of Child Welfare
Urban Field Operations
Cynthia Maritato, Acting
(313) 456-1100
Macomb County
Child Welfare Director
Longino Gonzales,
Acting
(586) 412-6100
Kent County
Child Welfare Director
Savator SeldenJohnson, Acting
(616) 247-6054
Domestic Violence
Debi Cain
56388
Child Welfare
Manager
Sheryl Thompson,
Acting 33570
County
Directors
Wayne Co.
Child Welfare Director
Margaret Warner
(313) 456-1044
Oakland County
Child Welfare Director
Susan Hull, Acting
(248) 975-5020
Genesee County
Child Welfare Director
Stacie Bowens, Acting
(810) 760-2645
Chief Administrative Officer
for Financial &
Administrative Services
Cash Assistance
Payments
Sharon Christensen,
Acting 33570
Ofc. of Inspector General
& Internal Controls
Alan Kimichik
53899
Ismael Ahmed, Director
03/03/09
Ofc. of Early Education
and Care/Fed. Liaison
Lisa Brewer-Walraven
19492
Deputy for
Financial, Quality &
Technology Services
John Sorbet
37787
Charles A. Jones
54655
Legal Affairs
Luttrell Levingston
32082
Division. of
Administrative Services
Dan Werk
18194
Division of Contracts
and Rate Setting
Helen Weber
33724
Accounting Division
Russ Hecko
32021
Budget Division
Jane Schultz
37904
Bureau of
Child Support
Marilyn Stephen
17460
Equal Opportunity &
Diversity Programs
James Newsom
38520
Family Advocate
Vacant
32101
FAP Payment
Accuracy Manager
Sandi Mose
56348
Human Resources
Susan King
38873
Internal Audit
Rod Markowski
32988
FAP
Intervention
Team
Office of Technology &
Information Management
Pratin Trivedi
52742
Bureau of Adult and
Family Services
Barbara Anders
56358
Office of Quality
Assurance
Julie Horn Alexander
34659
Campaign to End
Homelessness
Patricia Caruso
39889
Bureau of Community Action and Economic Opportunity
Proposed Organizational Chart 8/6/09
Director
Stacie Gibson
SOA17
Executive Secretaryl
11
Judith Clark
11##'-""""--,,,1
Assistant Director
Kris Schoenow
SAM 15
,~--'-----
II
Secretary 9
Carol Maddox
Department Mgr
Diane Holley
Dept Mgr 14 LTA
Vacant
Dept Spl13
CIS 13 LTA
Russell Glasgow
I
I
BCI11
VACANT
LTA
BCI11
VACANT
LTA
BCI11
VACANT
LTA
I
BCI11
VACANT
LTA
BCI11
VACANT
LTA
I
BCI11
VACANT
LTA
BCI11
VACANT
LTA
BCI11
James Smith
I
I
I
BCI11
Harvey
Hansen
BCI11
VACANT
LTA
Grant Mgr
DA 12
Jean Luttig
Grant Monitor
DA 12
Steve Listman
Grant Mgr
DA12
Jim Turner
Fiscal Monitor
FA 12
effrey Wyman
Grant Mgr
DA12
Viran Parag
r-'
BCI11
va:~:_
,]
BCI11
VACANT
LTA
I
BCI11
VACANT
LTA
BCI = Building Code Inspector
CIS = Code Inspector Supervisor
LTA = Limited Term Appointment
GM=Department Analyst
EXHIBIT F
Projected - CAA Funding Schedule
CAA 90% Funds Pass Through
COMMUNITY SERVICES BLOCK GRANT
PROJECTED - CAA FUNDING SCHEDULE
October 1, 2009 -- September 30, 2010
COMMUNITY ACTION AGENCY
ACSET - Community Action Agency *
Alger-Marquette Community Action Board
Allegan County Resource Development Committee, Inc.
Baraga-Houghton-Keweenaw CAA, Inc.
Community Action Agency of South Central Michigan
Capital Area Community Services, Inc.
Chippewa-Luce-Mackinac Community Action HRA, Inc.
Community Action Agency of Jackson, Lenawee, Hillsdale
Detroit - Department of Human Services *
Dickinson-Iron Community Services agency
Economic Opportunity Committee of St. Clair County, Inc.
EightCAP, Inc.
FiveCAP, Inc.
Genesee County Community Action Resource Department *
Gogebic-Ontonagon Community Action Agency
Human Development Commission
Kalamazoo County Human Development Bureau *
Macomb County Community Services Agency *
Menominee-Delta-Schoolcraft CAA & HRA
Mid-Michigan Community Action Agency, Inc.
Monroe County Opportunity Program
Muskegon-Oceana Community Action Partnership, Inc.
Northeast Michigan Community Service Agency
Northwest Michigan Human Services Agency
Oakland-Livingston Human Service Agency
Ottawa County Community Action Agency *
Saginaw County Community Action Committee, Inc.
Southwest Michigan Community Action Agency
Washtenaw County Employment Training & Com Ser Group *
Wayne Metropolitan Community Services Agency
TOTAL CAA DISTRIBUTION BY FORMULA
ALLOCATION
$981,365
$183,166
$175,018
$184,238
$610,070
$1,082,225
$173,299
$493,806
$7,006,197
$102,576
$268,779
$585,425
$297,287
$1,154,913
$90,499
$383,056
$546,335
$868,851
$180,487
$762,499
$212,523
$498,383
$551,470
$509,902
$1,337,658
$268,779
$604,780
$716,512
$587,568
$1,656,446
$23,074,113
* Public Agencies
Note 1. 90% Funds based on tentative FY09 CSBG State Allocation of $25,637,903 (CSBG Flat
Funding for FY2008)
Note 2. There is a minimum CAA funding level of $150,000. If an agency's formula allocation does not
meet this level, the state will allocate additional dollars (from CSBG-Discretionay Funds) to bring the
funding up to $150,000.
EXHIBIT G
Michigan Federally Recognized & Historic Tribes
and
MAP
FEDERALLY RECOGNIZED TRIBES
Bay Mills Chippewa Indian Community
12140 W. Lakeshore Drive
Brimley, MI 48715 (906) 248-3241
Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa & Chippewa Indians
2605 N.W. Bayshore Drive
Suttons Bay, MI 49682 (231) 271-3538
Keweenaw Bay Indian Community
107 Beartown
Baraga, MI 49908 (906) 353-6623
Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa
Indians
PO Box 249, Choate Road
Watersmeet, MI 49969 (906) 358-4477
Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe
7070 E. Broadway
Mt. Pleasant, MI 48848 (517) 775-4000
Pokagon Band of Potawatomi
901 Spruce
Dowagiac, MI 49047 (616) 782-8998
Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians
915 Emmet Street
Petoskey, MI 49770 (231) 348-3410
Little River Band of Ottawa Indians
PO Box 314
Manistee, MI 49660 (231) 723-8288
Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians
523 Ashmun Street
Sault Ste. Marie, MI 49783 (906) 635-6050
Nottawaseppi Huron Potawatomi
2221 1½ –Mile Rd.
Fulton, MI 49052 (616) 729-5151
Hannahville Potawatomi Indian Community
N-14911 Hannahville, B-1 Road
Wilson, MI 49896 (906) 466-2932
Gun Lake Tribe Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of
Potawatomi Indians of Michigan
1743 142nd Avenue, PO Box 218
Door, MI 48323 (616) 681-8830
HISTORIC TRIBES
Burt Lake Band of Ottawa & Chippewa Indians
6461 E. Brutus Rd., PO Box 206
Brutus, MI 49716 (231) 529-2005
Grand River Band of Ottawa Indians
1251 Plainfield, N.E., PO Box 2937
Grand Rapids, MI 49501 (616) 458-8759
Swan Creek Black River Confederated
Ojibwa Tribes of Michigan
1220 Court Street
Saginaw, MI 48602 (517) 799-0006
Mackinac Band of Chippewa & Ottawa Indians
PO Box 371
Hessel, MI 49745 (906) 484-2921
k:documents\Nat American\List of Tribes…8-08-06
EXHIBIT H
Designating New Eligible Entities
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - IM 42
COMMUNITY SER WCES BLOCK
GRANT PROGRAM
Information Memorandum
4 p
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Administration for Children and Families
Office of Community Services
Division of State Assistance
370 L'Enfant Promenade S.W.
1;~ 4. i[i[i;iWashington, D.C. 20447
Transmittal No. 42
Date: April 10,2000
To:
State Community Services Block Grant Directors and State Associations of
Community Action Agencies.
Snbject:
Ststiltor requirements for designation priority of private nonprofit
organizations over political subdivisions as eligible entities in unserved areas.
Purpose:
This memorandum restates the new statutory requirement that States designate a
qualified private nonprofit organization over a political subdivision to serve as an
eligible entity for receipt of CSBG funds, pursuant to the Community Services
Block Grant Act of 1998.
References:
Community Services Block Grant Act of 1998,42 USC 9909 (1999).
Policy Summary
The CSBG reauthorization in 1998 changed the requirements for how a State considers different
types of organizations in designating an "eligible entity" for an unserved geographic area.
Specifically, the statute now compels a State to seek a qualified private nonprofit organization as
the first option for designation. 42 USC § 9909(a)(l). Only in circumstances where no such
private nonprofit organization can qualify may a State consider designating a political
subdivision or public organization. 42 USC 5 9909(c). If a qualified private nonprofit
organization exists. a po1it~aIisu_bdivision
mav not be designated.
-
Therefore, in designating a new eligible entity, a State must first solicit applications from (1)
private nonprofit organizations within the unserved area that could be capable of
providing a range of services and meeting the requirements of the CSBG Act;
(2)
private nonprofit organizations that are already eligible entities in an area contiguous with
or within reasonable proximity to the unserved area.
In this first round of review, a State may not consider a political subdivision or an organization
other than a private nonprofit organization, even if such a subdivision or public organization
already serves as an eligible entity or receives CSBG funds. Only when the State cannot identify
a viable private nonprofit organization may it then designate a political subdivision.
Page 1 of 2
Inquiries
For Internet access to this and other CSBG information memoranda, please see the CSBG
website at: '~h~p://www.acf.dhhs.gov/programs/ocs/csb10htm".
Please address questions to:
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Administration for Children and Families
Office of Community Services
Division of State Assistance
370 L'Enfant Promenade SW, Suite 500 West
Washington, DC 20447
(202) 40 1-9343 [main phone]
(202) 401-5718 [fax]
7
Page 2 of 2
EXHIBIT I
CAA Audit Information
CAA AUDIT INFORMATION
Agency
Federal ID
Number
Agency
Fiscal Yr.
Last Audit Period
Ending Date
(month & year)
Date Report
was Received
by MFIA
* Area Community Services Employment & Training Council – CAA
238-2631431
July—June
06/30/2008
02/26/2009
Alger-Marquette Community Action Board
238-1797320
Oct—Sept
09/30/2008
03/09/2009
Allegan County Resource Development Committee, Inc.
238-1790220
Oct—Sept
09/30/2008
06/29/2009
Baraga-Houghton-Keweenaw Community Action Agency, Inc.
238-1800879
Oct—Sept
09/30/2008
03/30/2009
Community Action Agency of South Central Michigan
238-1794361
Jan—Dec
12/31/2008
06/12/2009
Capital Area Community Services, Inc.
238-1791181
Oct—Sept
09/30/2008
08/25/2009
Chippewa-Luce-Mackinac Community Action & Human Resources Authority, Inc.
238-1798626
Oct—Sept
09/30/2008
05/13/2009
Community Action Agency (of Jackson, Lenawee, Hillsdale)
238-1803599
Oct—Sept
09/30/2008
04/02/2009
* City of Detroit – Department of Human Services
238-6004606
July—June
06/30/2006
02/10/2009
Dickinson-Iron Community Services Agency
238-2889846
Oct—Sept
09/30/2008
06/01/2009
Economic Opportunity Committee of St. Clair, Inc.
238-2284121
Oct—Sept
09/30/2008
08/25/2009
EightCAP, Inc.
238-6111652
Oct—Sept
09/30/2008
04/07/2009
FiveCAP, Inc.
238-1814318
Oct—Sept
09/30/2008
02/27/2009
* Genesee County – Community Action Resource Department
238-6004849
Oct—Sept
09/30/2008
07/16/2009
Gogebic-Ontonagon Community Action Agency
238-1802755
Oct—Sept
09/30/2008
03/02/2009
Human Development Commission
238-1792679
Oct—Sept
09/30/2008
07/13/2009
* Kalamazoo County – Human Development Bureau
238-6004860
Jan—Dec
12/31/2008
06/26/2009
COMMUNITY ACTION AGENCY
* Macomb County – Community Services Agency
[Note: FY2007 audit in progress]
238-6004868
Jan—Dec
12/31/2007
09/23/2008
Menominee-Delta-Schoolcraft Community Action Agency & Human Resource Authority
[Note: FY2008 audit in progress]
238-1795659
Oct—Sept
09/30/2008
05/01/2009
Mid-Michigan Community Action Agency, Inc.
238-2056236
Oct—Sept
09/30/2008
07/22/2009
Monroe County Opportunity Program
238-1814239
Oct—Sept
09/30/2008
08/19/2009
Muskegon-Oceana Community Action Against Poverty, Inc.
238-1802280
Oct—Sept
09/30/2008
01/08/2009
Northeast Michigan Community Services Agency
238-1873461
Oct—Sept
09/30/2008
06/01/2009
Northwest Michigan Human Services Agency
238-2027389
Oct—Sept
09/30/2008
02/05/2009
Oakland-Livingston Human Services Agency
238-1785665
Jan—Dec
12/31/2008
06/24/2009
* Ottawa County - Community Action Agency
238-6004883
Jan—Dec
12/31/2008
07/07/2009
Saginaw County Community Action Committee, Inc.
238-1797894
Oct—Sept
09/30/2008
05/21/2009
Southwest Michigan Community Action Agency
238-2415106
Oct—Sept
09/30/2008
7/23/2009
* Washtenaw County - Employment Training & Human Services Group
238-6004894
Jan—Dec
12/31/2008
04/27/2009
Wayne Metropolitan Community Action Agency
238-1976979
Oct—Sept
09/30/2008
03/16/2009
* CAA is a Public Agency
Documents\Audits – CAAs\Exhibit I CAA audit information – updated 08-25-09
EXHIBIT J
Corrective Action – Termination or Reduction in Funding
CSPM Item 501
MICHIGAN FAMILY INDEPENDENCE AGENCY
Community
Services
Policy
Manual
SUBJECT
Item 501
Community Services Block Grant:
Page 1 of 4
·EFFECTIVE DATE
01/01/00
CORRECTIVE ACTION TERMINATION OR REDUCTION IN FUNDING
·END DATE
N/A
·ISSUE DATE
12/08/99
ISSUANCES AFFECTED:
REFERENCES
·
The CSBG Act, P.L. 97-35 of 1981, as amended by the
Coats Human Services Reauthorization Act of 1998
-- Section 676(b) State Application and Plan
-- Section 676(c) Funding Termination or Reductions
-- Section 678C. Corrective Action; Termination and
Reduction of Funding
·
PA 230 of 1981
·
Community Action Program (CAP) Administrative Rules,
R 400.19101—R 400.19606
PURPOSE:
To establish policy and procedures for Corrective Action, Termination or Reduction in
funding under the CSBG Program.
BACKGROUND:
·
Section 676(b)(8) of the Act requires that :
…any eligible entity in the State that received funding in the previous
fiscal year through a community services block grant made under this
subtitle will not have its funding terminated under this subtitle, or reduced
below the proportional share of funding the entity received in the previous
fiscal year unless, after providing notice and an opportunity for a hearing
on the record, the State determines that cause exists for such termination
or such reduction, subject to review by the Secretary as provided in
section 678C(b).
Note: Michigan’s definition of “eligible entity” is a community action agency
(CAA).
MICHIGAN FAMILY INDEPENDENCE AGENCY
Community
Services
Policy
Manual
SUBJECT
Item 501
Community Services Block Grant:
·EFFECTIVE DATE
01/01/00
CORRECTIVE ACTION TERMINATION OR REDUCTION IN FUNDING
·
Page 2 of 4
·END DATE
N/A
·ISSUE DATE
12/08/99
Section 676(c) of the Act states that – For the purposes of making a determination
in accordance with subsection (b)(8), with respect to:
1.
A Funding Reduction -- the term ‘cause’ includes:
a) a statewide redistribution of funds to respond to
· the results of the most recently available census or other appropriate
data;
· the designation of a new eligible entity; or
· severe economic dislocation; or
b) the failure of an eligible entity to comply with the terms of an agreement or
a State plan, or to meet a State requirement, as described in section
678C(a).
2.
·
A Termination -- the term ‘cause’ includes the failure of an eligible entity to
comply with the terms of an agreement or a State plan, or to meet a State
requirement, as described in section 678C(a).
Section 678C(a) of the Act requires that states follow specific steps when issuing
Corrective Action or imposing a Reduction or Termination in funding. Those steps
have been incorporated into the following policy. Note: A determination to
terminate the designation or reduce the funding of a CAA is reviewable by the
Secretary of the federal Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).
POLICY:
A) Cause for a statewde redistribution of CSBG funds includes the state’s
response to:
1.
The results of the most recently available census or other appropriate data;
2.
The establishment of a new eligible entity; and
3.
Severe economic dislocation.
B) Pursuant to the CAP Administrative Rules (R 400.19408), cause for reducing
the allocation to an agency or terminating funding to an agency includes the
state’s response to:
MICHIGAN FAMILY INDEPENDENCE AGENCY
Community
Services
Policy
Manual
SUBJECT
Item 501
Community Services Block Grant:
Page 3 of 4
·EFFECTIVE DATE
01/01/00
CORRECTIVE ACTION TERMINATION OR REDUCTION IN FUNDING
·END DATE
N/A
·ISSUE DATE
12/08/99
1.
The agency’s governing board failure to exercise sufficient authority or
leadership to ensure that FIA-administered funds are expended in
accordance with applicable regulations, laws, or contractual obligations.
2.
The agency’s administrative leadership failure to demonstrate that it has the
administrative knowledge and skills required to ensure that the agency’s
fiscal, personnel, program, or property management systems are adequate to
support FIA-funded projects.
3.
The agency’s failure to properly account for FIA-administered funds and
property.
4.
The agency’s lack of adequate general management systems to support FIAfunded programs.
5.
The agency’s demonstrated lack of capacity for effective service delivery of
FIA-funded programs.
6.
The agency having liabilities which significantly exceed its assets.
7.
The agency filing for bankruptcy.
8.
The agency’s failure to make substantive improvement in problem areas
identified in an audit or monitoring reports.
9.
The agency’s failure to meet performance objectives.[Pursuant to the Act,
Section 678C(a).]
C) Procedure:
If the state determines, on the basis of a final decision in a review pursuant to
section 678B (Monitoring of Eligible Entities) of the Act, that a CAA has failed to
comply with the terms of an agreement, or the State plan, to provide CSBG services
or to meet appropriate standards, goals, and other requirements established by the
State (see B above), FIA shall , pursuant to section 678C of the Act —
1.
Inform the CAA of the deficiency to be corrected;
2.
Require the CAA to correct the deficiency;
MICHIGAN FAMILY INDEPENDENCE AGENCY
Community
Services
Policy
Manual
SUBJECT
Item 501
Community Services Block Grant:
·EFFECTIVE DATE
01/01/00
CORRECTIVE ACTION TERMINATION OR REDUCTION IN FUNDING
3.
Page 4 of 4
·END DATE
N/A
·ISSUE DATE
12/08/99
a) Offer training and technical assistance, if appropriate, to help correct the
deficiency, and prepare and submit to the Secretary of HHS a report
describing the training and technical assistance offered; or
b) If FIA determines that such training and technical assistance are not
appropriate, prepare and submit to the Secretary of HHS a report stating
the reasons for this determination;
4.
a) At the discretion of FIA (taking into account the seriousness of the
deficiency and the time reasonably required to correct the deficiency),
allow the CAA to develop and implement, within 60 days after being
informed of the deficiency, a quality improvement plan to correct such
deficiency within a reasonable period of time, as determined by FIA; and
b) Not later than 30 days after receiving from the CAA a proposed quality
improvement plan pursuant to subparagraph a), either approve such
proposed plan or specify the reasons why the proposed plan cannot be
approved; and
5.
After providing adequate notice and an opportunity for a hearing, initiate
proceedings to terminate the designation of or reduce the CSBG funding of
the CAA unless the entity corrects the deficiency.
D) Review:
Pursuant to Section 678C, a determination to terminate the designation or reduce
the funding of a CAA is reviewable by the Secretary of HHS. The Secretary shall,
upon request, review such determination. The review shall be completed not later
than 90 days after the Secretary receives from FIA all necessary documentation
relating to the determination to terminate the designation or reduce the funding. If
the review is not completed within 90 days, the determination of FIA shall become
final at the end of the 90th day.
EXHIBIT K
CAA Directory
and
Service Area Map
COMMUNITY ACTION AGENCIES (CAAs)
See the Attached MAP
AGENCY
MAP No.
Alger-Marquette Community Action Board
1
Mr. Earl Hawn, Executive Director
1125 Commerce Drive, Marquette Michigan 49855
phone: 906-228-6522fax: 906-228-6527
E-Mail: [email protected]
www.amcab.org
Service area: counties of Alger, Marquette
Allegan County Resource Development Committee, Inc.
2
Mr. Edward Hillary, Executive Director
323 Water Street, Allegan, Michigan 49010
phone: 269-673-5472
fax: 269-673-3795
E-Mail: [email protected]
Service area: county of Allegan
Area Community Services Employment and Training Council - Community Action Agency
3
Ms. Beverly Drake, Director
Ms. Karen Tolan, Associate Director - CAA
144 East Fulton Street, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503
phone: 616-336-4100
fax: 616-336-4118
E-Mail:
[email protected]
Service area: county of Kent
Baraga-Houghton-Keweenaw Community Action Agency, Inc.
4
Ms. Jean LaBerg, Executive Director
926 Dodge St., Houghton, Michigan 49931
phone: 906-482-5528,
FAX: 906-482-5512
E-Mail: [email protected]
Service area: counties of Baraga, Houghton, Keweenaw
Capital Area Community Services, Inc.
Mr. Ivan Love, Jr., Executive Director
5
101 East Willow Street, Lansing, Michigan 48906
Phone: 517-482-6281
Fax: 517-482-7747
E-Mail:
[email protected]
Service area: counties of Clinton, Eaton, Ingham, Shiawasee
Community Action Agency of Jackson, Lenawee, Hillsdale
26
Ms. Marsha Kreucher, Executive Director
P.O. Drawer 1107, 1214 Greenwood, Jackson, Michigan 49204
phone: 517-784-4800
fax: 517-784-5188 or 517-784-6815
E-Mail: [email protected]
Website: www.caajlh.org
Service area: counties of Hillsdale, Jackson, Lenawee
COMMUNITY ACTION AGENCIES (CAAs)
See the Attached MAP
AGENCY
MAP No.
Community Action Agency of South Central Michigan
7
Ms. Nancy MacFarlane, Executive Director
P.O. Box 1026, 175 Main Street, Battle Creek, Michigan 49016
phone: 269-965-7766
fax: 269-965-1152
E-Mail: [email protected]
Service area: counties of Branch, Barry, Calhoun & St. Joseph Co.
6
Chippewa-Luce-Mackinac Community Action and Human Resources Authority, Inc.
Mr. Ronald J. Calery, Executive Director
P.O. Box 70, 524 Ashman Street, Sault Ste. Marie, MI 49783
Phone: 906-632-3363
FAX: 906-632-4255
e-mail:
[email protected]
Service area: counties of Chippewa, Luce, Mackinac
City of Detroit, Department of Human Services
21
Ms. Shenetta Coleman, Executive Director
5031 Grandy Street, Detroit, Michigan 48211
phone: 313-852-5628
fax: 313-852-4837
E-Mail: [email protected]
Service area: County of Wayne – City of Detroit only
Dickinson-Iron Community Services Agency
8
Mr. Jeff Heino, Executive Director
Crystal Lake Community Center
800 Crystal Lake Boulevard, Iron Mountain, Michigan 49801
phone: 906-774-2256
fax: 906-774-2257
E-Mail: [email protected]
Service area: counties of Dickinson, Iron
Economic Opportunity Committee of St. Clair County
9
Ms. Melinda Johnson, Executive Director
302 Michigan Street, Port Huron, Michigan 48060
phone: 810-982-8541
fax: 810-982-7233
E-Mail: [email protected]
Service area: county of St. Clair
EightCAP, Inc
10
Mr. John Van Nieuwenhuyzen, President
P.O. Box 368, Greenville, Michigan 48838
Phone: 616-754-9315
Fax: 616-754-9310
E-Mail:
[email protected]
Service area: counties of Gratiot, Ionia, Isabella, Montcalm
FiveCAP, Inc.
11
Ms. Mary Trucks, Executive Director
302 North Main Street, P.O. Box 37, Scottville, Michigan 49454
phone: 231-757-3785
fax: 231-757-9669
E-Mail: [email protected]
Service area: counties of Lake, Manistee, Mason, Newaygo
12
Genesee County Community Action Resource Department
Mr. Steve Walker, Executive Director
605 N. Saginaw Street, Flint, Michigan 48503
Phone: 810-762-4900
Fax: 810-768-4667
E-Mail: [email protected]
Service Area: County of Genesee
Gogebic-Ontonagon Community Action Agency
13
Ms. Carolynne Carlson, Executive Director
100 Mill Street, Bessemer, Michigan 49911
Phone: 906-667-0283
Fax: 906-663-0356
E-Mail:
[email protected]
Service area: Counties of Gogebic, Ontonagon
14
Human Development Commission
Ms. Mary Ann Vandemark, Executive Director
429 Montague Avenue, Caro, Michigan 48723
phone: 989-673-4121
fax: 989-673-2031
E-Mail: [email protected]
Service area: counties of Huron, Lapeer, Sanilac, Tuscola
15
Kalamazoo County Community Action Bureau
Mr. Miguel Rodriguez, Executive Director
P.O. Box 42, 3299 Gull Road, Nazareth, Michigan 49074-0042
phone: 269-373-5314
fax: 269-373-5132
E-Mail:
[email protected]
Service area: county of Kalamazoo
16
Macomb County Community Services Agency
Mr. Frank Taylor, Executive Director
VerKuilen Building, 21885 Dunham Road, Suite 10, Clinton Township, Michigan 48036-1030
phone: 586-469-6999
fax: 586-469-5530
E-Mail: [email protected]
Service area: county of Macomb
17
Menominee-Delta-Schoolcraft Community Action Agency and Human Resource Authority
Mr. William Dubord, Executive Director
507 First Avenue North, Escanaba, Michigan 49829-3998
phone: 906-786-7080
fax: 906-786-9423
E-Mail: [email protected]
Service area: counties of Delta, Menominee, Schoolcraft
18
Mid Michigan Community Action Agency, Inc.
Ms. Jill Sutton, Interim CEO, Executive Director
1574 East Washington Road 48622
phone: 989-386-3805
fax: 989-386-3277
E-Mail:
[email protected]
Service area: Bay, Clare, Gladwin, Mecosta, Midland, Osceola
Monroe County Opportunity Program
19
Ms. Stephanie Kasprzak, Executive Director
1140 S. Telegraph Road, Monroe, Michigan 48161-4006
phone: 734-241-2775
fax: 734-457-0630
Web Site: Http:monroecountyop.org
e-mail:
[email protected]
Service area: county of Monroe
20
Muskegon-Oceana Community Action Against Poverty, Inc.
Mr. Kenneth Shelton, Executive Director
1170 W. Southern, Muskegon, Michigan 49441
Phone: 231-725-9499
Fax: 231-722-1959
e-mail:
[email protected]
Service area: counties of Muskegon, Oceana
22
Northeast Michigan Community Service Agency
Mr. John Swise, Executive Director
2375 Gordon Road, Alpena, Michigan 49707
phone: 989-356-3474
fax: 989-354-5909
E-Mail:
[email protected]
Service area: counties of Alcona, Alpena, Arenac, Cheboygan, Crawford, Iosco, Montmorency, Ogemaw,
Oscoda, Otsego, Presque Isle
23
Northwest Michigan Community Action Agency
Mr. John Stephenson, Executive Director
3963 Three Mile Road, Traverse City, Michigan 49686-9164
phone: 231-947-3780
fax: 231-947-4935
E-Mail: [email protected]
Service area: counties of Antrim, Benzie, Charlevoix, Emmet, Grand Traverse, Kalkaska, Leelanau,
Missaukee, Roscommon, Wexford
24
Oakland Livingston Human Services Agency
Mr. Ron Borngesser, Executive Director, CEO
P.O. Box 430598, 2nd Floor, 196 Cesar E. Chavez, Pontiac, Michigan 48343-0598
phone: 248-209-2603
fax: 248-209-2645
E-Mail:
[email protected]
Service area: counties of Livingston, Oakland
25
Ottawa County Community Action Agency
Mr. Bill Raymond, Executive Director
12251 James Street, Suite 300, Holland, Michigan 49424-9661
phone: 616-393-5601
fax: 616-393-5612
E-Mail: [email protected]
Service area: county of Ottawa
27
Saginaw County Community Action Committee, Inc.
Ms. Lillie Williams, Executive Director
2824 Perkins, Saginaw, Michigan 48601
phone: 989-753-7741
fax: 989-753-2439
E-Mail:
[email protected]
Service area: county of Saginaw
28
Southwest Michigan Community Action Agency (SMCAA)
Mr. Arthur Fenrick Executive Director
nd
185 E. Main St, 2 Floor, Benton Harbor, Michigan 49022
phone: 800-334-7670
269-925-9077
fax: 269-925-9271
E-Mail: [email protected]
Service area: counties of Berrien, Cass, Van Buren
29
Washtenaw County Employment Training & Human Services Group
Ms. Trenda Rusher, Director
Employment Training and Community Services
P.O. Box 915, 555 Towner, Ypsilanti, Michigan 48197-0915
phone: 734-484-6610
fax: 734-484-7271
E-Mail:
[email protected]
service area: county of Washtenaw
30
Wayne-Metropolitan Community Action Agency
Mr. Louis Piszker, Executive Director
2121 Biddle, Suite 102, Wyandotte, Michigan 48192
phone: 734-246-2280
fax: 734-246-2288
E-Mail: [email protected]
Service area: county of Wayne – excluding the City of Detroit
COMMUNITY ACTON AGENCIES IN MICHIGAN
Service Area Map
1. Alger-Marquette Community Action Board
2. Allegan County Resource Development Committee
3. ACSET – Community Action Agency
4. Baraga-Houghton-Keweenaw Community Action Agency
5. Capital Area Community Services Agency
6. Chippewa-Luce-Mackinac Community Action & Human
Resource Authority
7. Community Action Agency of South Central Michigan
8. Dickinson-Iron Community Services Agency
9. Economic Opportunity Committee of St. Clair County
10. EIGHTCAP
11. FIVECAP
12. Genesee County Community Action Resource Department
13. Gogebic-Ontonagon County Community Action Agency
14. Human Development Commission
15. Kalamazoo County Community Action Bureau
16. Macomb County Community Services Agency
17. Menominee-Delta-Schoolcraft Community Action Agency
18. Mid-Michigan Community Action Agency
19. Monroe County Opportunity Program
20. Muskegon-Oceana Community Action Partnership
21. City of Detroit - Department of Human Services
22. Northeast Michigan Community Services Agency
23. Northwest Michigan Human Services Agency
24. Oakland-Livingston Human Services Agency
25. Ottawa County Community Action Agency
26. Community Action Agency - JLH
27. Saginaw County Community Action Committee
28. Southwest MI Community Action Agency
29. Washtenaw County Employment Training & Human Services
Group
30. Wayne Metropolitan Community Action Agency
EXHIBIT L
ROMA
National Performance Indicators
And
State Indicator and State Measures/Sub-Indicators
“AT – A – GLANCE”
Planning and Reporting Requirements
For
National Performance Indicators
This Document Also Includes
State Performance Indicators and State Measures
Use This Document
As A Planning & Reporting Requirements Tool
For FY2010 ROMA Planning
And
For FY2009 ROMA Reporting
Changes/Updates are noted in BOLD print.
Attachment: The State NPI Housing Program Summary
Michigan Department of Human Services
Bureau of Community Action and Economic Opportunity
August 6, 2009
1
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Goal 1: Low-Income People Become More Self-Sufficient
NPI 1.1 – Employment.......................................................................................................................... 3
NPI 1.2 – Employment Supports .......................................................................................................... 3
NPI 1.3 – Economic Asset Enhancement and Utilization ..................................................................... 4
Goal 2: The Conditions in Which Low-Income People Live are Improved
NPI 2.1 – Community Improvement and Revitalization ........................................................................ 5
NPI 2.2 – Community Quality of Life and Assets.................................................................................. 6
NPI 2.3 – Community Engagement - NEW........................................................................................... 6
NPI 2.4 – Employment Growth from ARRA Funds - NEW ................................................................... 6
Goal 3: Low-Income People Own a Stake in Their Community
NPI 3.1 – Community Enhancement through Maximum Feasible Participation - NEW........................ 7
(The number of volunteer hours donated by LOW-INCOME Individuals)
NPI 3.2 – Community Empowerment through Maximum Feasible Participation .................................. 7
Goal 4: Partnerships Among Supporters and Providers of Service to Low-Income
People are Achieved
NPI 4.1 – Expanding Opportunities through Community-Wide Partnerships ....................................... 8
Goal 5: Agencies Increase Their Capacity to Achieve Results
NPI 5.1 – Agency Development - NEW ................................................................................................ 8
NPI 5.2 – Agency Capacity Building and Quality Improvement – STATE Indicator ............................. 9
Goal 6: Low-Income People, Especially Vulnerable Populations, Achieve Their
Potential by Strengthening Family and Other Supportive Systems
NPI 6.1 – Independent Living ............................................................................................................. 10
NPI 6.2 – Emergency Assistance ....................................................................................................... 10
NPI 6.3 – Child and Family Development........................................................................................... 11
NPI 6.4 – Family Supports – NEW .................................................................................................... 13
(For Seniors, Disabled and Caregivers) Who are Unable to Work
NPI 6.5 – Service Counts – “Outputs” - NEW..................................................................................... 13
Attachment: State NPI Housing Program Summary ........................................................................ 14
2
Goal 1: Low-Income People Become More Self-Sufficient
National Performance Indicator 1.1 – Employment (See page 13 in the Manual.)
The number and percentage of low-income participants in community action employment initiatives who get a
job or become self-employed as measured by one or more of the following outcome measures:
A. Unemployed and obtained a job.
B. Employed and maintained a job for at least 90 days
C. Employed and obtained an increase in employment income and/or benefits.
D. Achieved “living wage” employment and/or benefits.
What to Report: For each applicable program, report the number of participants in the program, the number of
participants expected to achieve the outcome during the report period and the actual number of participants
achieving the result during the report period.
National Performance Indicator 1.2 – Employment Supports
(See page 19 in the Manual.)
The number of low-income participants for whom barriers to initial or continuous employment are reduced or
eliminated through assistance from community action as measured by one or more of the following outcome
measures:
NOTE: This indicator is for services to individuals who are employable or employed – Helping families as they
prepare for or retain employment. (Agencies do not have to document that the service was “in order to gain or
maintain employment” as that wording has been removed from the measures below. It is also possible to
plan/report some indicators/services here that are also provided under 6.2-Emergency Services.
DO NOT INCLUDE services here that are included under the new indicator 6.4 which is where you will plan/report
supports to those who are unable to work.
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
G.
H.
I.
J.
K.
L.
Obtained skills/competencies required for employment.
Completed ABE/GED and received certificate or diploma.
Completed post-secondary education program and obtained certificate or diploma.
Enrolled children in “before” or “after” school programs.
Obtained care for child or other dependant.
Obtained access to reliable transportation and/or driver’s license.
Obtained health care services for themselves or a family member.
Obtained safe and affordable housing.
Obtained food assistance.
Obtained non-emergency LIHEAP (home-heating) energy Assistance.
Obtained non-emergency WX energy assistance.
Obtained OTHER non-emergency energy assistance (State/local/private energy programs. Do not
include LIHEAP or WX.)
M. OTHER: Obtained assistance with vehicle payments or vehicle maintenance.*
N. OTHER: Obtained assistance with clothing/uniforms, or tools, etc.*
O. OTHER: Obtained assistance with testing or certification costs.*
P.
OTHER: Agency must define measure.
*Additional breakout of “OTHER” at the State level.
What to Report: For each of the above outcomes, report an unduplicated count of the number of participants in
programs with that outcome, and the number who achieve the outcome during the reporting period. This
should include successful referrals of participants to “partnering” agencies.
3
National Performance Indicator 1.3 – Economic Asset Enhancement and Utilization
(See page 25 in the Manual.)
The number and percentage of low-income households that achieve an increase in financial assets
and/or financial skills as a result of community action assistance, and the aggregated amount of those
assets and resources for all participants achieving the outcome, as measured by one or more of the
following outcome measures:
A. ENHANCEMENTS:
1. Number and percent of participants in tax preparation programs who qualify for any type of Federal or
State tax credit and the expected aggregated dollar amount of credits.
2. Number and percentage of participants who obtained court-ordered child support payments and the
expected annual aggregated dollar amount of payments.
3. Number and percentage of participants who were enrolled in telephone lifeline and/or energy discounts
with the assistance of the agency and the expected aggregated dollar amount of savings.
4. State Measure: Energy Savings: Number and percent of participants practicing at least three (3) Energy
Saving Techniques. (It is expected that participants will utilize less energy and will realize savings in
dollars not spent on energy costs.)
5. State Measure: Other Discount Savings Programs: Number and percentage of participants in (describe
program) and the expected aggregated dollar amount of savings.
6. OTHER: Agency must define measure.
B. UTILIZATION:
1. Number and percent demonstrating ability to complete and maintain a budget for over 90 days.
2. Number and percent opening an Individual Development Account (IDA) or other savings account.
3. Number and percent of participants who increased their savings through IDA or other savings accounts
and the aggregated amount of savings.
4. Of participants in a community action asset development program (IDA and others):
a. Number and percent capitalizing a small business due to accumulated savings.
b. Number and percent pursuing post-secondary education due to savings.
c. Number and percent purchasing a home due to accumulated savings.
d. Number and percent of participants purchasing other assets with accumulated savings.
5. OTHER: Agency must define measure.
What to Report: For each applicable program, report the number of participants in the program, the number of
participants expected to achieve the outcome during the report period and the actual number of participants
achieving the result during the report period. In addition, where applicable, the aggregated dollars amounts of
payments, credits or savings.
4
Goal 2: The Conditions in Which Low-Income People Live are Improved
National Performance Indicator 2.1 – Community Improvement and Revitalization
(See page 30 in the Manual.)
Increase in, or preservation of opportunities and community resources or services for low-income people in the
community as a result of community action projects/initiatives or advocacy with other public and private
agencies, as measured by one or more of the following outcome measures:
A. Jobs created, or saved, from reduction or elimination in the community. (Includes jobs under 2.4.)
B. Accessible “living wage” jobs created or retained in the community.
C. Safe and affordable housing units created in the community.
D. Safe and affordable housing units in the community preserved or improved through construction,
weatherization or rehabilitation achieved by community action activity or advocacy.
E. Accessible and affordable health care services/facilities for low-income people created or saved from
reduction or elimination.
F. Accessible safe and affordable childcare or child development placement opportunities for low-income
families created, or saved from reduction or elimination.
G. Accessible “before” school and “after” school program placement opportunities for low-income families
created, or saved from reduction or elimination..
H. Accessible new or expanded transportation resources, or those that are saved from reduction or elimination,
that are available to low-income people, including public or private transportation.
I. Accessible or increased educational and training placement opportunities, or those that are saved from
reduction or elimination, that are available for low-income people in the community, including vocational,
literacy and life skill training, ABE/GED, and post-secondary education.
J. “State” Measure: Safe and affordable housing units are maintained in the community for low-income
People, the disabled and/or seniors, through direct management of a housing project/complex.
What to Report: For each applicable program, report the Number of Projects or Initiatives and the Number of
Opportunities and/or Community Resources Preserved or Increased.
5
National Performance Indicator 2.2 -- Community Quality of Life and Assets
(See page 36 in the Manual.)
The quality of life and assets in low-income neighborhoods are improved by community action initiative or
advocacy, as measured by one or more of the following:
A. Increases in community assets as a result of a change in law, regulation or policy, which results in
improvements in quality of life and assets.
B. Increase in the availability or preservation of community facilities.
C. Increase in the availability or preservation of community services to improve public health and safety.
D. Increase in the availability or preservation of commercial services within low-income neighborhoods.
E. Increase or preservation of neighborhood quality-of-life resources.
What to Report: For each applicable program initiative or agency advocacy effort, report the number of
community assets, services or facilities preserved or increased.
National Performance Indicator 2.3 -- Community Engagement – NEW
(See page 40 in the Manual.)
The number of community members working with Community Action to improve conditions in the
community.
A. Number of community members mobilized by Community Action that participate in community
revitalization and anti-poverty initiatives.
B. Number of volunteer hours donated to the agency. (This will be ALL volunteer hours.
What to Report: Report the number of persons mobilized and the number of volunteer hours donated.
National Performance Indicator 2.4 – Employment Growth from ARRA Funds – NEW
(See page 42 in the Manual.)
The total number of jobs created or saved, at least in part by ARRA funds, in the community.
A. Jobs created at least in part by ARRA funds.
B. Jobs saved at least in part by ARRA funds.
What to Report: Report the number of jobs created or saved. Note: These number should also be
reported in 2.1 A.
6
Goal 3: Low-Income People Own a Stake in Their Community
National Performance Indicator 3.1 – Community Enhancement through Maximum Feasible
Participation: The number of volunteers hours donated to Community Action. – NEW
(See page 44 in the Manual.)
- The number of volunteer hours donated by LOW-INCOME individuals to community action. (ONLY
low-income individuals.)
What to Report: Report the number of hours donated by LOW-INCOME community volunteers in
service to agency programs.
National Performance Indicator 3.2 – Community Empowerment through Maximum Feasible
Participation (See page 45 in the Manual.)
The number of low-income people mobilized as a direct result of community action initiative to engage in
activities that support and promote their own well-being and that of their community as measured by one or
more of the following outcome measures:
A. Number of low-income people participating in formal community organizations, government, boards or
councils that provide input to decision-making and policy setting through community action efforts.
B. Number of low-income people acquiring businesses in their community as a result of community action
assistance.
C. Number of low-income people purchasing their own homes in their community as a result of community
action assistance.
D. Number of low-income people engaged in non-governance community activities or groups created or
supported by community action.
What to Report: For each applicable area, report the number of low-income persons mobilized as a direct
result of community action.
7
Goal 4: Partnerships Among Supporters and Providers of Service to LowIncome People are Achieved
National Performance Indicator 4.1 – Expanding Opportunities through Community-Wide Partnerships
(See page 48 in the Manual.)
The number of organizations, both public and private, community action actively works with to expand
resources and opportunities in order to achieve family and community outcomes. – CHANGED to include a
specific list of organization types.
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
G.
H.
I.
J.
K.
L.
M.
N.
Non-Profit
Faith Based
Local Government
State Government
Federal Government
For-Profit Business or Corporation
Consortiums/Collaboration
Housing Consortiums/Collaboration
School Districts
Institutions of post secondary education/training
Financial/Banking Institutions
Health Service Institutions
State-wide associations or collaborations
OTHER: Describe type of organizations.
What to Report: Report the number of organizations for each category/type with which community action works
to promote family and community outcomes. Include those organizations that the agency funds or is funded
by, organizations through MOUs, referral organizations, etc. Do not include typical “vendor” relationships.
Goal 5: Agencies Increase Their Capacity to Achieve Results
National Performance Indicator 5.1 – Agency Development: - NEW (See page 51 in the Manual.)
The number of human capital resources available to Community Action that increase agency capacity
to achieve family and community outcomes, as measured by one or more of the following.
A.
B.
C.
D.
Number of C-CAPs (Certified Community Action Professionals)
Number of ROMA Trainers (Certified)
Number of Family Development Trainers (Certified)
Number of Child Development Trainers (Certified)
E.
F.
Number of staff attending ALL TRAININGS.
Number of Board Members attending trainings.
G. HOURS of staff spent in trainings (ALL TRAINING0
H. HOURS of Board Members spent in trainings.
I.
“OTHER” Certified Training not listed above. Identify training program.
What to Report: Number of persons or hours respectively.
8
“STATE” Performance Indicator 5.2 – Agency Capacity Building and Quality Improvement
Agencies engage in capacity building and quality improvement as measured by one or more of the following
measures/sub-indicators.
A. Agency financial stability and reporting process is strengthened through new financial system upgrades.
When to Report: Only report new financial systems or upgrades that occurred in the fiscal year being
reported.
B. Agency program reporting is strengthened through client tracking, or network systems, development or
upgrades.
When to Report: Only report if changes occurred in the fiscal year being reported.
C. Agency performance is strengthened through staff development and/or training.
When to Report: This is not meant for overall on-going staff training. Only report activities where you
can identify a positive change in staff performance related to a specific training experience/curriculum in
the fiscal year being reported.
D. Agency performance in meeting client needs is improved or expanded through enhanced case
management initiatives.
When to Report: Only report if changes occurred in the fiscal year being reported.
E. Agency programs become more effective and relevant by conducting, and implementing recommendations
from, Community Needs Assessments and/or public forums.
When to Report: Only report for the year in which the changes were implemented. Example:
Community Needs Assessment occurred in FY09 and changes will not be implemented until FY10.
Only report this outcome in FY10.)
F. Agency boards FORMALLY review agency programs through an INTERNAL ORGANIZATION
ASSESSMENT PROCESS.
When to Report: Only report for the year in which the organizational assessment occurred.
G. Agency boards conduct FORMAL STRATEGIC PLANNING INITIATIVES.
When to Report: Only report for the year in which the strategic planning initiative occurred.
9
Goal 6: Low-Income People, Especially Vulnerable Populations, Achieve Their
Potential by Strengthening Family and Other Supportive Systems
National Performance Indicator 6.1 – Independent Living (See page 54 in the Manual.)
The number of vulnerable individuals receiving services from community action that maintain an independent
living situation as a result of those services:
A. Senior Citizens (Disabled seniors may be reported twice, once under “A.” and again under “B., ages 55”
and over.)
B. Individuals with Disabilities (by age group):
Ages: 0-17
Ages: 18-54
Ages: 55-0ver
C. OTHER groups: Identify specific barrier(s) being addressed in the measure language. (See page 56
in the Manual.)
What to Report: Report the count of the number of seniors or individuals with disabilities who continue to live
independently during the reporting period as a result of receiving one or more services from the agency.
National Performance Indicator 6.2 – Emergency Assistance (See page 57 in the Manual.)
The number of low-income individuals served by community action that sought emergency assistance and the
number of those individuals for which assistance was provided, including such services as:
A.
B.
Emergency Food (examples: individuals accessing TEFAP, Food Pantries, Soup Kitchens).
Emergency FUEL or UTILITY payments funded by LIHEAP or other public and private funding
sources.
C.-1 Emergency Payments for Rent or Mortgage.
C.-2 Emergency Payments to vendors to prevent ‘FORECLOSURE.”
D. Emergency Car or Home Repair (appliances, heating systems, minor repairs, non-CSBG
structural repairs, etc.)
E.
Emergency Temporary Shelter
F.
Emergency Medical Care
G. Emergency Protection from Violence
H. Emergency Legal Assistance
I.
Emergency Transportation (bus tokens, taxi vouchers, loaned auto, van service, or some other form of
transportation)
J.
Emergency Disaster Relief
K.
Emergency Clothing
L.
OTHER: A Specific definition for “other” must be included when reporting under “Other”.
What to Report: For each of the above areas, report an unduplicated count of the number of “individuals”
seeking assistance and the number of “individuals” receiving that type of assistance during the reporting
period.
10
National Performance Indicator 6.3 – Child and Family Development (See page 63 in the Manual.)
The number and percentage of all infants, children, youth, parents, and other adults participating in
developmental or enrichment programs that achieve program goals, as measured by one or more of the
following measures/sub-indicators:
A. INFANTS AND PRE-SCHOOL CHILDREN –
1. Infants and children obtain age appropriate immunizations, medical and dental care.
2. Infant and child health and physical development are improved as a result of adequate nutrition.
3. Children participate in pre-school activities to develop school readiness skills.
4. Children who participate in pre-school activities are developmentally ready to enter Kindergarten or 1st
Grade.
5. State Measure: Infants and/or pre-school children participating in nutritional programs focused on
Childhood and Family Obesity who gain/experience better nutritional family habits. (Non-Head Start
activities.)
6. “OTHER” - define measure when reporting.
B. YOUTH –
1. Youth improve physical health and development.
2. Youth improve social/emotional development.
3. Youth avoid risk-taking behavior for a defined period of time.
4. Youth have reduced involvement with criminal justice system.
5. Youth increase academic, athletic or social skills for school success. (Activity does not have to
relate to before or after-school programs.)
6. State Measure: School age Youth participating in nutritional programs focused on Childhood and Family
Obesity who gain/experience better nutritional family habits. (Non-Head Start activities.)
7. “OTHER” - define measure when reporting.
C. PARENTS AND OTHER ADULTS –
1. Parents and other adults learn and exhibit improved parenting skills.
2. Parents and other adults learn and exhibit improved family functioning skills.
3. State Measure: Parents or other Adults participating in nutritional programs focused on Childhood and
Family Obesity who gain/experience better nutritional family habits. (Non-Head Start activities.)
4. “OTHER” - define measure when reporting.
11
National Performance Indicator 6.3 – Child and Family Development [continuation]
D. “STATE” Measure - FAMILY MAINTENANCE: (Safety-Net services that demonstrate an increase in the
ability of a family/household to function, to maintain a safe and stable household situation, with assistance,
and in the context of “supportive system.")
1. Medical Care Enrollment and/or Counseling (state measure): Number of participants enrolling in Health
Care Plans, accessing Health Care Providers and/or accessing Health Benefit Counseling.
1-A Michigan Enrolls: Number of Medicaid recipients enrolled in a health care plan and have access to
health care providers as result of CAA assistance. [CAA Field Enrollment Counselors provide Medicaid
clients with health plan information, identify available doctors in the plans and help enroll clients in the
plan of their choice.]
1-B Michigan Medical Assistance Program (MMAP): Number of seniors who accessed free
comprehensive health-benefit counseling services, including guidance through the Medicare and
Medicaid programs, as result of CAA assistance. [Highly trained and certified counselors empower
beneficiaries to make informed health benefit decisions.]
1-C Other Medical Enrollment or Counseling program: (Provide program title, description of activities
and expected results – use format similar to A and B above.)
2. Supplemental Food (state measure/sub): Number of households accessing nutritional food through a
routine/planned supplemental food distribution process. (Programs such as: CSFP, MIC, EFP, WIC,
Congregate Meals, Home Delivered Meals, Fresh Food Initiatives – food distribution not reported
under indicator 6.2 Emergency Assistance, A. Food.) Note: Report unduplicated number of participants
for each separate program.
3. Housing Subsidies, Vouchers or Certificates (state measure): Number of households maintaining
stable housing with subsidies. (Example: Section 8 Vouchers and Subsidies, non-emergency
programs/shelter not already reported under 6.2 Emergency Assistance, C. Temporary Shelter.)
4. Family Self-Sufficiency or Case Management (state measure): Number of households participating in
structured counseling or case management activities who maintain a stable family, and/or stable
housing (example: TANF Housing Eviction Prevention case management), environment.
5. Foreclosure Counseling or Case Management (state measure): Number of households participating in
counseling or case management to resolve their housing crisis. Note: ROMA Plans may be written
using the broad scope as written here or under a more defined scope as noted under A, B and C.
5-A Number of households facing foreclosure that participate in counseling or case management and
maintain their present housing. (This includes foreclosure mitigation.)
5-B Number of households facing foreclosure that participate in counseling or case management and
are relocated to income appropriate stable housing.
5-C Number of households facing foreclosure that participate in counseling or case management and
are referred to another housing provider for assistance.
What to Report: For each applicable program/activity, report the number of participants (or households) in the
activity, the number of participants (or households) expected to achieve the outcome during the report period
and the actual number of participants (or households) achieving the result during the report period.
12
National Performance Indicator 6.4 – Family Supports – for Seniors, Disabled and Caregivers – who are
unable to work, especially seniors, adults with disabilities and caregivers, for whom barriers to family
stability are reduced or eliminated, as measured by one or more of the following. - NEW
(See page 70 in the Manual.)
A. Enrolled children in before or after school programs.
B. Obtained care for child or other dependant.
C.
D.
E.
F.
Obtained access to reliable transportation.
Obtained health care services for themselves or family member.
Obtained safe and affordable housing.
Obtained food assistance.
G. Obtained non-emergency LIHEAP energy assistance.
H. Obtained non-emergency WX energy assistance.
I. Obtained non-emergency energy assistance (do not include LIHEAP or WX)
J. “OTHER” - define measure when reporting.
What to report: Report the number of individuals seeking assistance and the number of individuals
receiving assistance. Note: Do Not also report these activities under 1.2.
National Performance Indicator 6.5 – Service Counts –“Outputs” - NEW (See page 75 in the Manual.)
A. The number of Food Boxes distributed
B. The number of Pounds of Food distributed
C. The number of Units of Clothing distributed
D. The number of Rides Provided
E. The number of Information and Referral Calls
What to Report: Agencies should report the number of services and resources that are provided to
meet immediate, short-term needs of low-income individuals and families.
13
CSBG-IS State NPI Housing Program Summary
(List developed in FY08)
NPI
Program Name
1.2.H
1.2.H
1.3.B.3.C
2.1.B
2.1.B
2.1.B
2.1.B
2.1.B
2.1.B
2.1.C
2.1.C
2.1.C
2.1.C
2.1.C
2.1.C
2.1.C
2.1.C
2.1.C
2.1.C
2.1.H
2.1.H
4.1
4.1
Housing Resource
Prisoner Re-entry Housing Program
IDA
Acquisition Development/Resale
Home Construction
Home Purchase Rehabilitation
LIHTC
Neighborhood Impact Program
Rural Development 502
CDBG
Emergency Home Repair
Homeowner Assistance
Home Purchase Rehabilitation
Home Repair\Rehab.
Housing Preservation
Neighborhood Improvement Program
Property Improvement Program
Rental Rehab
Single Family Home Rehab
Homeownership Counseling
LINKS
Homeless Continuum of Care
Housing Technical Assistance
6.1.A *
6.1.B
6.2.B
6.2.B
6.2.B
6.3.D.3
6.3.D.3
Description
Housing Search Assistance/Landlord Advocacy
Subsidized temporary housing
Home Purchase
Home purchase
New Home Construction
Home Purchase
Low-income Home Development
Home purchase
Homebuyer affordable loan
Home Rehabilitation
CDBG
Single Family Homeowner Rehab
Home Rehabilitation
Home repairs
Home Owner Rehab
Home Owner Rehab
Homeowner/Landlord Affordable Loan
Rental Rehab
Deferred, no interest for Home Rehab to HUD HQS
Prepare first time home buyers for home purchase
Home Ownership Counseling
Participation in Regional Co Coalitions
Community Program to increase financial resources for
housing rehab/replacement (Agency Groups)
Affordable Housing allowing Seniors to live independently
Home owner rehab
Emergency Shelter
Emergency vendor payments to keep people in their homes
Housing Eviction Prevention – emergency vendor payment
Subsidized temporary housing up to 2 years
Subsidies to maintain safe/stable housing (not time limited)
Senior Citizen Apartments
Permanent Supportive Housing
Emergency Shelter
Homeless Prevention Program
TANF Housing
Transitional Housing
HARP-Homeless Assistance Recovery
Program
6.3.D.3
Homeless Assistance Recovery
Subsidized Housing with Case Management
Program
6.3.D.3
Homeless Prevention Program
Voucher Payments
6.3.D.3
Housing Choice Voucher
Subsidized Housing
6.3.D.3
Section 8 Housing
Rental Assistance
6.3.D.3
Supportive Housing Program
Lease assistance and supportive services
6.3.D.3
Tenant Based Rental Assistance
Subsidized Housing with 2-year limit
6.3.D.4** TANF Housing
Housing Eviction Prevention – case management
*For CAA Management of existing housing units :
2.1.I.-State Measure/Sub-Indicator: Safe and affordable housing units are maintained in the community for
low-income people, the disabled and/or seniors, through “direct management” of a housing project/complex.
**For CAA Housing case management:
6.3.D.4.-State Measure/Sub-Indicator: Family Self-Sufficiency or Case Management: Number of households
participating in structured counseling or case management activities who maintain a stable family, and/or stable
housing, environment.
k:CSBG\2010\CAA Planning Instructions\CAP Part II\At-A-Glance Planning & Reporting Requirements for NPIs 8-06-09.doc
14
EXHIBIT M
Unexpended Funds – Carry-Forward Policy
CSPM Item 507
MICHIGAN FAMILY INDEPENDENCE AGENCY
Community
Services
Policy
Manual
SUBJECT
Item 507
Community Services Block Grant:
Page 1 of 2
EFFECTIVE DATE
05/08/00
UNEXPENDED FUNDS –
CARRY-FORWARD POLICY
END DATE
ISSUE DATE
05/08/00
ISSUANCES AFFECTED:
REFERENCES
The CSBG Act, P.L. 97-35 of 1981, as amended by the Coats
Human Services Reauthorization Act of 1998: Sec. 675C.(a), (3)
Recapture and Redistribution of Unobligated Funds
PURPOSE:
To provide policy regarding the carry forward of unobligated/unexpended CSBG funds that are
allocated to community action agencies (CAAs) by formula.
BACKGROUND
Sec. 675C.(a), (3) “Recapture and Redistribution of Unobligated Funds” provides that a state
may recapture funds, distributed to an eligible entity through a grant, that are
unobligated/unexpended at the end of a fiscal year if such funds exceed 20 percent of the
amount distributed to the entity for that fiscal year. It also allows the state to redistribute the
recaptured funds to other eligible entities.
POLICY:
Unexpended funds within 20% of an agency’s annual allocation (allocation includes any
discretionary funds allocated to an agency to bring its funding up to a minimum level) will be
returned to the CAA for carry forward. For Example: An agency must spend 100% of any
carry-in, plus 100% of any recaptured and redistributed funds, plus a minimum of 80% of their
annual allocation to be eligible to carry forward unexpended funds.
Unexpended funds exceeding 20% will be recaptured and redistributed as noted below. This
policy takes effect beginning with FY2000 unexpended funds.
Note: This policy does not apply to discretionary funds allocated to agencies for T/TA activities;
unexpended T/TA funds may not be carried forward.
1. The amount of funds to be recaptured will be determined based on the fiscal year’s final
September 30 Statement of Expenditures report. Final reports must be submitted no later
than December 31.
MICHIGAN FAMILY INDEPENDENCE AGENCY
Community
Services
Policy
Manual
SUBJECT
Item 507
Community Services Block Grant:
Page 2 of 2
EFFECTIVE DATE
05/08/00
UNEXPENDED FUNDS –
CARRY-FORWARD POLICY
END DATE
ISSUE DATE
05/08/00
2. Recaptured funds will be distributed during the 2nd quarter of the following fiscal year when
the fiscal year’s final allocations are made (based on receipt of the final state allotment from
HHS) and allowable carry-forward is returned to the agencies.
3. Recaptured funds will be distributed as follows:
·
Recaptured funds totaling less than $20,000: Such funds will be added to the final
amount identified each fiscal year to be distributed to all agencies by formula. The
regular funding allocation formula will then be applied to the total funds to be distributed
and the resulting amounts will become the formula allocations for that fiscal year.
·
Recaptured funds totaling $20,001—$200,000: Such funds will be distributed equally
to agencies who have spent 100% of their prior year’s allocation, carry-in, and any
recaptured funds.
·
Recaptured funds exceeding $200,000: FIA will determine a distribution formula to
include agencies who spent between 90—100% of their prior year’s allocation, 100% of
their carry-in, and 100% of any recaptured funds.
EXHIBIT N
Environmental Tobacco Smoke Certification
CERTIFICATION REGARDING ENVIRONMENTAL TOBACCO SMOKE
Public Law 103227, Part C Environmental Tobacco Smoke, also known as the Pro Children Act of 1994,
requires that smoking not be permitted in any portion of any indoor routinely owned or leased or contracted
for by an entity and used routinely or regularly for provision of health, day care, education, or library
services to children under the age of 18, if the services are funded by Federal programs either directly or
through State or local governments, by Federal grant, contract, loan, or loan guarantee.
The law does not apply to children's services provided in private residences, facilities funded solely by
Medicare or Medicaid funds, and portions of facilities used for inpatient drug or alcohol treatment. Failure
to comply with the provisions of the law may result in the imposition of a civil monetary penalty of up to
$1000 per day and/or the imposition of an administrative compliance order on the responsible entity.
By signing and submitting this application the applicant/grantee certifies that it will comply with the
requirements of the Act.
The applicant/grantee further agrees that it will require the language of this certification be included in any
subawards which contain provisions for the children's services and that all subgrantees shall certify
accordingly.
Signature:
__________________________________
Title:
Ismael Ahmed, Director
Organization: Michigan Department of Human Services
Date: ________________________
EXHIBIT O
Lobbying–Contracts, Grants, Loans...Certification
CERTIFICATION REGARDING LOBBYING
Certification for Contracts, Grants, Loans, and Cooperative Agreements
The undersigned certifies, to the best of his or her knowledge and belief, that:
(1) No Federal appropriated funds have been paid or will be paid, by or on behalf of the undersigned, to any person
for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of an agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or
employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with the awarding of any Federal
contract, the making of any Federal grant, the making of any Federal loan, the entering into of any cooperative
agreement, and the extension, continuation, renewal, amendment, or modification of any Federal contract, grant, loan,
or cooperative agreement.
(2) If any funds other than Federal appropriated funds have been paid or will be paid to any person for influencing or
attempting to influence an officer or employee of any agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of
Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with this Federal contract, grant, loan, or
cooperative agreement, the undersigned shall complete and submit Standard Form-LLL, ``Disclosure Form to Report
Lobbying,'' in accordance with its instructions.
(3) The undersigned shall require that the language of this certification be included in the award documents for all
subawards at all tiers (including subcontracts, subgrants, and contracts under grants, loans, and cooperative
agreements) and that all subrecipients shall certify and disclose accordingly. This certification is a material
representation of fact upon which reliance was placed when this transaction was made or entered into. Submission of
this certification is a prerequisite for making or entering into this transaction imposed by section 1352, title 31, U.S.
Code. Any person who fails to file the required certification shall be subject to a civil penalty of not less than $10,000
and not more than $100,000 for each such failure.
Statement for Loan Guarantees and Loan Insurance
The undersigned states, to the best of his or her knowledge and belief, that:
If any funds have been paid or will be paid to any person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or
employee of any agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of
Congress in connection with this commitment providing for the United States to insure or guarantee a loan, the
undersigned shall complete and submit Standard Form-LLL, ``Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying,'' in accordance
with its instructions. Submission of this statement is a prerequisite for making or entering into this transaction
imposed by section 1352, title 31, U.S. Code. Any person who fails to file the required statement shall be subject to a
civil penalty of not less than $10,000 and not more than $100,000 for each such failure.
Signature
_________________________________
Title:
Organization:
Ismael Ahmed, Director
Michigan Department of Human Services
Date: ___________________________
EXHIBIT P
Debarment, Suspension...Certification
CERTIFICATION REGARDING DEBARMENT, SUSPENSION AND
OTHER RESPONSIBILITY MATTERS
Certification Regarding Debarment, Suspension, and Other Responsibility Matters
--Primary Covered Transactions
Instructions for Certification
1. By signing and submitting this proposal, the prospective primary participant is providing the certification
set out below.
2. The inability of a person to provide the certification required below will not necessarily result in denial of
participation in this covered transaction. The prospective participant shall submit an explanation of why it
cannot provide the certification set out below. The certification or explanation will be considered in
connection with the department or agency's determination whether to enter into this transaction. However,
failure of the prospective primary participant to furnish a certification or an explanation shall disqualify
such person from participation in this transaction.
3. The certification in this clause is a material representation of fact upon which reliance was placed when
the department or agency determined to enter into this transaction. If it is later determined that the
prospective primary participant knowingly rendered an erroneous certification, in addition to other remedies
available to the Federal Government, the department or agency may terminate this transaction for cause or
default.
4. The prospective primary participant shall provide immediate written notice to the department or agency
to which this proposal is submitted if at any time the prospective primary participant learns that its
certification was erroneous when submitted or has become erroneous by reason of changed circumstances.
5. The terms covered transaction, debarred, suspended, ineligible, lower tier covered transaction,
participant, person, primary covered transaction, principal, proposal, and voluntarily excluded, as used in
this clause, have the meanings set out in the Definitions and Coverage sections of the rules implementing
Executive Order 12549. You may contact the department or agency to which this proposal is being
submitted for assistance in obtaining a copy of those regulations.
6. The prospective primary participant agrees by submitting this proposal that, should the proposed covered
transaction be entered into, it shall not knowingly enter into any lower tier covered transaction with a person
who is proposed for debarment under 48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4, debarred, suspended, declared ineligible,
or voluntarily excluded from participation in this covered transaction, unless authorized by the department
or agency entering into this transaction.
7. The prospective primary participant further agrees by submitting this proposal that it will include the
clause titled ``Certification Regarding Debarment, Suspension, Ineligibility and Voluntary Exclusion-Lower
Tier Covered Transaction,'' provided by the department or agency entering into this covered transaction,
without modification, in all lower tier covered transactions and in all solicitations for lower tier covered
transactions.
8. A participant in a covered transaction may rely upon a certification of a prospective participant in a lower
tier covered transaction that it is not proposed for debarment under 48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4, debarred,
suspended, ineligible, or voluntarily excluded from the covered transaction, unless it knows that the
certification is erroneous. A participant may decide the method and frequency by which it determines the
eligibility of its principals. Each participant may, but is not required to, check the List of Parties Excluded
from Federal Procurement and Nonprocurement Programs.
9. Nothing contained in the foregoing shall be construed to require establishment of a system of records in
order to render in good faith the certification required by this clause. The knowledge and information of a
participant is not required to exceed that which is normally possessed by a prudent person in the ordinary
course of business dealings.
10. Except for transactions authorized under paragraph 6 of these instructions, if a participant in a covered
transaction knowingly enters into a lower tier covered transaction with a person who is proposed for
debarment under 48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4, suspended, debarred, ineligible, or voluntarily excluded from
participation in this transaction, in addition to other remedies available to the Federal Government, the
department or agency may terminate this transaction for cause or default.
************
Certification Regarding Debarment, Suspension, and Other Responsibility Matters--Primary Covered
Transactions
(1) The prospective primary participant certifies to the best of its knowledge and belief, that it and its
principals:
(a) Are not presently debarred, suspended, proposed for debarment, declared ineligible, or
voluntarily excluded by any Federal department or agency;
(b) Have not within a three-year period preceding this proposal been convicted of or had a civil
judgment rendered against them for commission of fraud or a criminal offense in connection with
obtaining, attempting to obtain, or performing a public (Federal, State or local) transaction or
contract under a public transaction; violation of Federal or State antitrust statutes or commission of
embezzlement, theft, forgery, bribery, falsification or destruction of records, making false
statements, or receiving stolen property;
(c) Are not presently indicted for or otherwise criminally or civilly charged by a governmental entity
(Federal, State or local) with commission of any of the offenses enumerated in paragraph (1)(b) of
this certification; and
(d) Have not within a three-year period preceding this application/proposal had one or more public
transactions (Federal, State or local) terminated for cause or default.
(2) Where the prospective primary participant is unable to certify to any of the statements in this
certification, such prospective participant shall attach an explanation to this proposal.
Grant Number: FY2010 CSBG
Signature:
______________________________________
Title:
Ismael Ahmed, Director
Organization: Michigan Department of Human Services
Date: ______________________
EXHIBIT Q
Drug-Free Workplace Certification
CERTIFICATION REGARDING DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE REQUIREMENTS
This certification is required by the regulations implementing the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988: 45
CFR Part 76, Subpart, F. Sections 76.630(c) and (d)(2) and 76.645(a)(1) and (b) provide that a Federal
agency may designate a central receipt point for STATE-WIDE AND STATE AGENCY-WIDE
certifications, and for notification of criminal drug convictions. For the Department of Health and Human
Services, the central pint is: Division of Grants Management and Oversight, Office of Management and
Acquisition, Department of Health and Human Services, Room 517-D, 200 Independence Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20201.
Certification Regarding Drug-Free Workplace Requirements (Instructions for Certification)
1. By signing and/or submitting this application or grant agreement, the grantee is providing the certification
set out below.
2. The certification set out below is a material representation of fact upon which reliance is placed when the
agency awards the grant. If it is later determined that the grantee knowingly rendered a false certification, or
otherwise violates the requirements of the Drug-Free Workplace Act, the agency, in addition to any other
remedies available to the Federal Government, may take action authorized under the Drug-Free Workplace
Act.
3. For grantees other than individuals, Alternate I applies.
4. For grantees who are individuals, Alternate II applies.
5. Workplaces under grants, for grantees other than individuals, need not be identified on the certification. If
known, they may be identified in the grant application. If the grantee does not identify the workplaces at the
time of application, or upon award, if there is no application, the grantee must keep the identity of the
workplace(s) on file in its office and make the information available for Federal inspection. Failure to
identify all known workplaces constitutes a violation of the grantee's drug-free workplace requirements.
6. Workplace identifications must include the actual address of buildings (or parts of buildings) or other
sites where work under the grant takes place. Categorical descriptions may be used (e.g., all vehicles of a
mass transit authority or State highway department while in operation, State employees in each local
unemployment office, performers in concert halls or radio studios).
7. If the workplace identified to the agency changes during the performance of the grant, the grantee shall
inform the agency of the change(s), if it previously identified the workplaces in question (see paragraph
five).
8. Definitions of terms in the Nonprocurement Suspension and Debarment common rule and Drug-Free
Workplace common rule apply to this certification. Grantees' attention is called, in particular, to the
following definitions from these rules:
Controlled substance means a controlled substance in Schedules I through V of the Controlled Substances
Act (21 U.S.C. 812) and as further defined by regulation (21 CFR 1308.11 through 1308.15);
Conviction means a finding of guilt (including a plea of nolo contendere) or imposition of sentence, or both,
by any judicial body charged with the responsibility to determine violations of the Federal or State criminal
drug statutes;
Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the manufacture,
distribution, dispensing, use, or possession of any controlled substance;
Employee means the employee of a grantee directly engaged in the performance of work under a grant,
including: (i) All direct charge employees; (ii) All indirect charge employees unless their impact or
involvement is insignificant to the performance of the grant; and, (iii) Temporary personnel and consultants
who are directly engaged in the performance of work under the grant and who are on the grantee's payroll.
This definition does not include workers not on the payroll of the grantee (e.g., volunteers, even if used to
meet a matching requirement; consultants or independent contractors not on the grantee's payroll; or
employees of subrecipients or subcontractors in covered workplaces).
Certification Regarding Drug-Free Workplace Requirements
Alternate I. (Grantees Other Than Individuals)
The grantee certifies that it will or will continue to provide a drug-free workplace by:
(a) Publishing a statement notifying employees that the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing,
possession, or use of a controlled substance is prohibited in the grantee's workplace and specifying the
actions that will be taken against employees for violation of such prohibition;
(b) Establishing an ongoing drug-free awareness program to inform employees about -(1)The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace;
(2) The grantee's policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace;
(3) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee assistance programs; and
(4) The penalties that may be imposed upon employees for drug abuse violations occurring in the
workplace;
c) Making it a requirement that each employee to be engaged in the performance of the grant be given a
copy of the statement required by paragraph (a);
(d) Notifying the employee in the statement required by paragraph (a) that, as a condition of
employment under the grant, the employee will -(1) Abide by the terms of the statement; and
(2) Notify the employer in writing of his or her conviction for a violation of a criminal drug statute
occurring in the workplace no later than five calendar days after such conviction;
(e) Notifying the agency in writing, within ten calendar days after receiving notice under paragraph
(d)(2) from an employee or otherwise receiving actual notice of such conviction. Employers of
convicted employees must provide notice, including position title, to every grant officer or other
designee on whose grant activity the convicted employee was working, unless the Federal agency has
designated a central point for the receipt of such notices. Notice shall include the identification
number(s) of each affected grant;
(f) Taking one of the following actions, within 30 calendar days of receiving notice under paragraph
(d)(2), with respect to any employee who is so convicted -(1) Taking appropriate personnel action against such an employee, up to and including termination,
consistent with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended; or
(2) Requiring such employee to participate satisfactorily in a drug abuse assistance or rehabilitation
program approved for such purposes by a Federal, State, or local health, law enforcement, or other
appropriate agency;
(g) Making a good faith effort to continue to maintain a drug-free workplace through implementation of
paragraphs (a), (b), (c), (d), (e) and (f).
(B) The grantee may insert in the space provided below the site(s) for the performance of work done in
connection with the specific grant:
Place of Performance (Street address, city, county, state, zip code)
Street:
City:
County:
State:
235 South Grand Avenue
Lansing,
Ingham
Michigan 48909
Check if there are workplaces on file that are not identified here.
Alternate II. (Grantees Who Are Individuals)
(a) The grantee certifies that, as a condition of the grant, he or she will not engage in the unlawful
manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of a controlled substance in conducting any
activity with the grant;
(b) If convicted of a criminal drug offense resulting from a violation occurring during the conduct of any
grant activity, he or she will report the conviction, in writing, within 10 calendar days of the conviction,
to every grant officer or other designee, unless the Federal agency designates a central point for the
receipt of such notices. When notice is made to such a central point, it shall include the identification
number(s) of each affected grant.
[55 FR 21690, 21702, May 25, 1990]
Signature:
__________________________________
Title:
Ismael Ahmed, Director
Organization: Michigan Department of Human Services
Date: ________________________
Fly UP