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Sciences
Sciences
Sciences
SCIENCES - Table of Contents
SUMMARY OF COURSE CHANGES.........................................................1
New Programs......................................................................2
Programs - Resource Implications..................................................3
Deleted Programs..................................................................6
Programs - Other Changes..........................................................7
New Courses......................................................................32
Courses - Resource Implications..................................................36
Deleted Courses..................................................................44
Renumbered Courses...............................................................45
Reweighted Courses...............................................................46
Courses - Description Changes....................................................47
Changes in Course Name...........................................................63
Courses - Other Changes..........................................................65
i
SUMMARY OF COURSE CHANGES
Department Name
Anthropology
Astronomy
Biology
Biomedical
Communications
Chemistry
Communication, Culture
and Information
Technology
Computer Science
Earth Science
Economics
Environment
Forensic Science
Geography
Mathematics
Physics
Psychology
Science
Sociology
Statistics
No. of full
courses
deleted
No. of full
courses
added
No. of half
courses
deleted
No. of half
courses
added
No. of full
courses
changed
No. of half
courses
changed
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
2
0
2
1
0
3
15
0
8
0
0
0
0
0
5
0
1
0
0
0
7
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
2
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
2
0
2
1
4
25
5
4
0
1
5
SUMMARY OF COURSE CHANGES
1
Sciences
New Programs
NONE
New Programs
2
Sciences
Programs - Resource Implications
Program #1 ERMAJ0105 Anthropology (Science)
Resource implications: None.
Program #2 ERMAJ1061 Environmental Science (Science)
Resource implications: not applicable
Program #3 ERMAJ1149 Biology for Health Sciences (Science)
Resource implications: None.
Program #4 ERMAJ1160 Psychology (Science)
Resource implications: None
Program #5 ERMAJ1376 Chemistry (Science)
Resource implications: There are no resource implications.
Program #6 ERMAJ1540 Statistics, Applied (Science)
Resource implications: None
Program #7 ERMAJ1688 Computer Science
Resource implications: None.
Program #8 ERMAJ1883 Exceptionality in Human Learning (Science)
Resource implications: None
Program #9 ERMAJ2364 Biology (Science)
Resource implications: None.
Program #10 ERMAJ2511 Mathematical Sciences (Science)
Resource implications: None
Program #11 ERMIN1160 Psychology (Science)
Resource implications: None
Program #12 ERMIN1376 Chemistry (Science)
Resource implications: There are no resource implications.
Program #13 ERMIN1540 Statistics, Applied (Science)
Resource implications: None
Program #14 ERMIN1688 Computer Science
Resource implications: None.
Program #15 ERSPE0105 Anthropology (Science)
Programs - Resource Implications
3
Sciences
Resource implications: None.
Program #16 ERSPE0482 Comparative Physiology (Science)
Resource implications: None.
Program #17 ERSPE1020 Ecology and Evolution (Science)
Resource implications: None.
Program #18 ERSPE1038 Information Security (Science)
Resource implications: None.
Program #19 ERSPE1061 Environmental Science (Science)
Resource implications: not applicable
Program #20 ERSPE1118 Biotechnology (Science)
Resource implications: None.
Program #21 ERSPE1160 Psychology (Science)
Resource implications: None
Program #22 ERSPE1338 Forensic Anthropology (Science)
Resource implications: N/A
Program #23 ERSPE1376 Chemistry (Science)
Resource implications: There are no resource implications.
Program #24 ERSPE1505 Forensic Psychology (Science)
Resource implications: N/A
Program #25 ERSPE1540 Statistics, Applied (Science)
Resource implications: None.
Program #26 ERSPE1688 Computer Science (Science)
Resource implications: None
Program #27 ERSPE1868 Bioinformatics
Resource implications: None
Program #28 ERSPE1883 Exceptionality in Human Learning (Science)
Resource implications: None
Program #29 ERSPE1995 Biological Chemistry (Science)
Resource implications: There are no resource implications.
Program #30 ERSPE2364 Biology (Science)
Programs - Resource Implications
4
Sciences
Resource implications: None.
Program #31 ERSPE2470 Behaviour, Genetics, and Neurobiology (Science)
Resource implications: None
Program #32 ERSPE2511 Mathematical Sciences (Science)
Resource implications: none
Programs - Resource Implications
5
Sciences
Deleted Programs
NONE
Deleted Programs
6
Sciences
Programs - Other Changes
Program #1 ERMAJ0105 Anthropology (Science)
Rationale for change:
These controls were useful at time when Anthropology had few faculty members but now we have a
significant complement. In addition we found that required lab courses were oversubscribed but given the
new lab space being developed, this should not be an issue any longer. We also believe that this will allow
enrollments to rise in classes that currently have low enrollment. Finally, we feel that many students mature
intellectually during their 2nd year and in their 3rd year. The current controls eliminate such students from
the potential enjoyment of, and being informed by, our exciting discipline. Furthermore, given that 50% is a
passing grade, these students should have access to upper year courses as part of a Major in Anthropology.
In addition the department will introduce that ANT200Y5Y be divided into 2 half courses. The second half of
ANT200Y will be introduced as a new course. As result the program requirements need to be amended to
reflect the new course changes.
Before:
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment in this program is limited. To qualify, students must have completed 4.0
achieved at least 65% in both
ANT101H5 and ANT102H5, and achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.00.
Students applying to enrol after second year must have completed 8.0 credits, achieved at least
65% in each of ANT200Y5, 203Y5, 204H5/206H5/207H5/208H5/209H5
credits (including ANT101H5 and ANT102H5),
and achieved a CGPA of at least 2.00.
Second Year 1. ANT200Y5,203Y5
2. ANT204H5 and 0.5 from ANT206H5/207H5/208H5/209H5
After:
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment in this program is limited. To qualify, students must have completed 4.0
credits (including ANT101H5 and ANT102H5), and achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least
2.00. Students applying to enrol after second year must have completed 8.0 credits, and achieved a CGPA
of at least 2.00.
Second Year 1. ANT(200H5, 201H5),203Y5
2. ANT204H5 and 0.5 from ANT206H5/207H5/208H5/209H5
Program #2 ERMAJ0305 Geographical Information Systems (Science)
Rationale for change:
This change is in response to the elimination of GGR117Y with the replacement of GGR111H5 and
GGR112H5.
Before:
First Year 1.0 credit:
GGR117Y5
First Year 1.0 credit:
GGR111H5 & GGR112H5
After:
Program #3 ERMAJ1061 Environmental Science (Science)
Rationale for change:
These are all responses to known changes to other department’s courses.
Before:
First Year: 3.0 credits
- Introduction: ENV100Y5
- Quantitative Foundation: 1.0 credit chosen from this list: CSC108H5, 148H5; MAT134Y5, 135Y5, 137Y5
- Basic Scientific Foundation: 1.0 credit chosen from this list: ANT101H5; BIO152H5, 153H5; ERS103H5,
120H5; CHM140Y5, 110H5, 120H5; PHY135Y5, 136H5, 137H5
Be sure to look ahead and plan to complete the prerequisites for any upper-level courses that are of interest
to you.
Second Year: 2.5 credits
- Environmental Management Perspectives: ENV201H5
- Biological & Ecological Perspectives: 0.5 credit chosen from this list: BIO200H5, 204H5, 205H5, 206H5,
215H5
- Geographical Perspectives: 0.5 credit chosen from this list: GGR214H5, 217H5, 227H5
- Physical & Chemical Perspectives: 0.5 credit chosen from this list:
Programs - Other Changes
7
CHM221H5, 231H5,
Sciences
242H5; ERS201H5, 202H5, 203H5; PHY237H5
- Analytical & Research Methods: 0.5 credit chosen from this list: CHM211H5; BIO360H5; GGR276H5,
278H5, 337H5; STA220H5; or another program-relevant 200/300-level Research Methods course (SCI),
with permission of the Program Advisor
Upper Years: 2.5 credits
- Field, Experiential & Research Perspectives: 0.5 credit chosen from this list: ANT318H5;
BIO301H5,
302H5, 313H5, 316H5, 329H5; ERS325H5; ENV232H5, 299Y5, 331H5, 399Y5, 400Y5;
GGR317H5 (with field-trip option), 379H5; SCI398H5, 498H5, 499H5; or another program-relevant
Field, Experiential, or Research course (SCI), with permission of the Program Advisor
- Biogeochemical Perspectives: 1.5 credit chosen from this list: BIO311H5, 312H5, 318Y5, 328H5, 330H5,
333H5, 373H5, 405H5, 406H5, 436H5, 464H5; GGR305H5, 307H5, 309H5, 311H5, 312H5, 315H5, 316H5,
317H5, 321H5, 337H5, 338H5, 372H5, 375H5, 377H5, 378H5, 403H1, 406H5, 407H5, 409H1, 413H1,
463H5, 464H5, 479H5; CHM310H1, 311H5, 333H5, 347H5, 361H5, 362H5, 391H5, 393H5; ENV315H1;
ERS315H5, 321H5; PHY331H5, 332H5
- Social, Economic & Policy Perspectives: 0.5 credit chosen from this list: ANT357H5, 368H5,
370H5,
457H5; ECO373Y5; ENG259H5; ENV393H5; GGR329H5, 333H5, 345H5, 348H5, 349H5, 361H5,
365H5, 367H5, 369H5, 370H5, 378H5, 380H5; HIS318H5, 319H5; MGT394H5; PHL255H5, 273H5, 373H1;
POL250Y5, 343Y5; SOC226H5, 319Y5, 339H5, 349H5, 355H5, 356H5; WRI375H5
Note: ENV490H5, 491H5 can substitute for #1, #2, #3, or #4 as course requirements, where appropriate,
and with permission of the Program Advisor or Academic Counsellor.
After:
Note This is intended to be an interdisciplinary program. At least
four different disciplines must be represented among the courses
that are counted as program requirements. For example, a course
list selected from ENV + GGR + HIS + PHL is acceptable, but a
course list selected only from ENV + GGR + HIS is not; a course
list selected from ENV + ENG + ECO + POL is acceptable, but a
course list selected only from ENV + ECO + POL is not. Please
contact the Program Advisors or Academic Counsellor if you
have any questions about the validity of your course selections.
First Year: 3.0 credits
- Introduction: ENV100Y5
- Quantitative Foundation: 1.0 credit chosen from this list: CSC108H5, 148H5; MAT134Y5, 135Y5, 137Y5
- Basic Scientific Foundation: 1.0 credit chosen from this list: ANT101H5; BIO152H5, 153H5; ERS103H5,
120H5; CHM110H5, 120H5; PHY135Y5, 136H5, 137H5
Be sure to look ahead and plan to complete the prerequisites for any upper-level courses that are of interest
to you.
Second Year: 2.5 credits
- Environmental Management Perspectives: ENV201H5
- Biological & Ecological Perspectives: 0.5 credit chosen from this list: BIO200H5, 204H5, 205H5, 206H5,
215H5
- Geographical Perspectives: 0.5 credit chosen from this list: GGR214H5, 217H5, 227H5
- Physical & Chemical Perspectives: 0.5 credit chosen from this list:
CHM231H5, 242H5,
JCP221H5; ERS201H5, 202H5, 203H5; PHY237H5
- Analytical & Research Methods: 0.5 credit chosen from this list: CHM211H5; BIO360H5; GGR276H5,
278H5, 337H5; STA220H5; or another program-relevant 200/300-level Research Methods course (SCI),
with permission of the Program Advisor
Upper Years: 2.5 credits
- Field, Experiential & Research Perspectives: 0.5 credit chosen from this list: ANT318H5;
BIO313H5,
329H5, 416H5; ERS325H5; ENV232H5, 299Y5, 331H5, 399Y5, 400Y5; GGR317H5 (with field-trip
option), 379H5; SCI395H5, 396H5, 498H5, 499H5; or another program-relevant Field,
Experiential, or Research course (SCI), with permission of the Program Advisor
- Biogeochemical Perspectives: 1.5 credit chosen from this list: BIO311H5, 312H5, 318Y5, 328H5, 330H5,
333H5, 373H5, 405H5, 406H5, 436H5, 464H5; GGR305H5, 307H5, 309H5, 311H5, 312H5, 315H5, 316H5,
317H5, 321H5, 337H5, 338H5, 372H5, 375H5, 377H5, 378H5, 403H1, 406H5, 407H5, 409H1, 413H1,
463H5, 464H5, 479H5; CHM310H1, 311H5, 333H5, 347H5, 361H5, 362H5, 391H5, 393H5; ENV315H1;
ERS315H5, 321H5; PHY331H5, 332H5
Programs - Other Changes
8
Sciences
- Social, Economic & Policy Perspectives: 0.5 credit chosen from this list: ANT357H5, 368H5, 370H5;
ECO373Y5; ENG259H5; ENV393H5; GGR329H5, 333H5, 345H5, 348H5, 349H5, 361H5, 365H5, 367H5,
369H5, 370H5, 378H5, 380H5; HIS318H5, 319H5; MGT394H5; PHL255H5, 273H5, 373H1; POL250Y5,
343Y5; SOC226H5, 339H5, 349H5, 356H5; WRI375H5
Note: ENV490H5, 491H5 can substitute for #1, #2, #3, or #4 as course requirements, where appropriate,
and with permission of the Program Advisor or Academic Counsellor.
Program #4 ERMAJ1149 Biology for Health Sciences (Science)
Rationale for change:
1. BIO304H5 is a pre-requisite for BIO310H5 (already a program requirement). Adding BIO304H5
acknowledges the fact that students must complete this course in order to move into BIO310H5. 2. Addition
of BIO375H5 to Cell, Molecular, and Developmental Biology reflects addition of new BIO375H5 course (Intro
Medical Biotechnology) for 2012-2013, which will be a course option for all Biology for Health Science Major
students.
Before:
8.0 credits are required including at least 2.0 at the 300/400 level.
- BIO152H5, 153H5; (CHM110H5, 120H5)/ CHM140Y5; MAT134Y5*/135Y5/137Y5
- BIO206H5, 207H5, 210Y5, 310H5, 380H5, (BIO360H5/STA220H5/PSY201H5)
- 1.5 credits from one of the following lists: Cell, Molecular, and Biotechnology Stream: BIO200H5, 215H5,
314H5, 315H5, 370Y5, 372H5, 374H5, 476H5, 477H5; JBC472H5 Neuroscience Stream: BIO215H5,
304H5, 315H5, 403H5, 409H5, 411H5, 434H5 Genes and Behaviour Stream: BIO215H5, 315H5, 318Y5,
341H5, 361H5, 407H5, 434H5, 442H5, 443H5 *MAT134Y5 - Calculus for Life Sciences is highly
recommended. NOTES: 1. Students should be aware of the distinct credit requirement for their degree (see
section 8.6 - HBSc Degree Requirements for full details). Completion of this program with another
non-specialist Biology program will not satisfy the min. 12.0 distinct credit requirement for a degree. Please
choose programs and courses accordingly. 2. Students may take no more than 2.0 credits combined in
ROP, Individual Projects or Thesis courses at the 300/400-level for credit toward their Biology
program. 3. As part of your degree requirement the 'Biology for Health Sciences' Major would be
academically complemented by a Major in Psychology, Anthropology, Exceptionality in Human Learning,
Forensic Science, and Chemistry, as well as other disciplines such as the Major in Management. This major
program would also be complemented by a Minor in Biomedical Communications (Science).
After:
8.0 credits are required including at least 2.0 at the 300/400 level.
- BIO152H5, 153H5; (CHM110H5, 120H5)/ CHM140Y5; MAT134Y5*/135Y5/137Y5
- BIO206H5, 207H5, 210Y5,
-
304H5, 310H5, 380H5, (BIO360H5/STA220H5/PSY201H5)
1.0 credits from one of the following lists: Cell, Molecular, and Biotechnology Stream: BIO200H5, 215H5,
314H5, 315H5, 370Y5, 372H5, 374H5, 375H5, 476H5, 477H5; JBC472H5 Neuroscience Stream:
BIO215H5, 304H5, 315H5, 403H5, 409H5, 411H5, 434H5 Genes and Behaviour Stream: BIO215H5,
315H5, 318Y5, 341H5, 361H5, 407H5, 434H5, 442H5, 443H5 *MAT134Y5 - Calculus for Life Sciences is
highly recommended. NOTES: 1. Students should be aware of the distinct credit requirement for their
degree (see section 8.6 - HBSc Degree Requirements for full details). Completion of this program with
another non-specialist Biology program will not satisfy the min. 12.0 distinct credit requirement for a degree.
Please choose programs and courses accordingly. 2. Students may take no more than 2.0 credits combined
in ROP, Internship Program, or Individual Project / Thesis courses at the
300/400-level for credit toward their Biology program. 3. As part of your degree requirement the 'Biology for
Health Sciences' Major would be academically complemented by a Major in Psychology, Anthropology,
Exceptionality in Human Learning, Forensic Science, and Chemistry, as well as other disciplines such as the
Major in Management. This major program would also be complemented by a Minor in Biomedical
Communications (Science).
Program #5 ERMAJ1160 Psychology (Science)
Rationale for change:
All programs offered by the Department of Psychology lead to the B.Sc. Degree and require a 2nd year
course in statistics as well as 2nd and/or 3rd year courses in brain and behaviour. Our current students are
ill prepared in both areas resulting in a high failure and drop rate in courses such as PSY201H. Psychology
increasingly focuses on the biological basis of behaviour even in areas that have been studied primarily by
social scientists. Fields such as personality, social behaviour, and parenting now involve genetic
components as well as imaging of the live brain during cognitive tasks to better understand the biological
mechanisms that underlie behaviour. We are also interested in synchronizing our admission requirements
with those of other B.Sc. programs in Psychology including St. George. Most require Biology and more
advanced math than what we currently require.
Programs - Other Changes
9
Sciences
Before:
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment in this program is limited to students who have:
- completed any Gr.12(4U) Mathematics or equivalent;
- completed 4.0 credits;
- a grade of at least 63% in PSY100Y5; and
- a minimum CGPA of 2.0. Students not initially meeting these requirements may be admissible after
meeting the second-year requirements. Further information is available on the Psychology Department web
site: www.utm.utoronto.ca/psychology
After:
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment in this program is limited to students who have:
- completed any Gr.12(4U) Mathematics or equivalent;
- completed 4.0 credits;
- a grade of at least 63% in PSY100Y5; and
* First year students applying to this program in
2014/15 will be required to have completed Gr.12(4U) Biology and
Advanced Functions or equivalent. Students not initially meeting these requirements
- a minimum CGPA of 2.0.
may be admissible after meeting the second-year requirements. Further information is available on the
Psychology Department web site: www.utm.utoronto.ca/psychology
Program #6 ERMAJ1376 Chemistry (Science)
Rationale for change:
In the Limited Enrolment description for all Chemistry programs, we are changing the first year Chemistry
mark requirement so that rather than requiring a specific mark in both CHM110 and CHM120, we will now
require that same mark ONLY in CHM120. Rationale (for all programs): Many students struggle with the
transition from high school to university. In order to allow them more time to adjust to university life before
assessing their eligibility for CHM programs, we will consider their mark only from the second first year CHM
course, CHM120, rather than both CHM110 and CHM120.
Before:
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment in the Chemistry Major Program is based on completion of 4.0 credits
including CHM140Y5/(110H5,120H5) (minimum grade of
MAT134Y5/135Y5/137Y5.
After:
60%) and
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment in the Chemistry Major Program is based on completion of 4.0 credits
CHM140Y5(minimum grade of 60%)/(110H5,120H5) (minimum grade
60% in CHM120H5) and MAT134Y5/135Y5/137Y5.
including
of
Program #7 ERMAJ1540 Statistics, Applied (Science)
Rationale for change:
This aligns the stats major enrolment criteria with those for the UTM math major; quasi-aligns UTM with StG
stats specialists requires completion 4.0 courses all at 50% (accepts MAT137Y/135Y1); StG does not offer
any 100 level stats courses; ; STA107H5 is not a prerequisite for any other course, but CS & math both
require their specialist & majors to complete STA257H5, also economics accepts STA257H+STA258H as
equivalent to ECO227Y – so many good students don’t take STA107H, and we don’t want to exclude them
from our programs; Courses renumbering.
Before:
Limited Enrolment:
After:
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment in the Major program is limited to students with a minimum of 4.0 courses to
"Limited Enrolment - Enrolment in the Major program is limited to students
with a minimum of 4.0 courses to include MAT223H5; 60% in STA107H5; and
MAT137Y5 or 60% in MAT233H5 or 60% in MAT134Y5/ 135Y5."
Higher Years STA331H5, 332H5; 1.0 additional credit from STA219H5, 312H5/313H5,
322H5/304H5/304H1, 348H5, 413H5, 431H5, 437H5, 442H5, 457H5
STA107H5 or 60% in STA257H5; and MAT137Y5
/135Y5/134Y5 or 75% in MAT133H5; a minimum cumulative grade
point average, to be determined annually.
Higher Years STA302H5/331H5, 305H5/332H5; 1.0 additional credit from STA219H5,
312H5/313H5, 322H5/304H5/304H1, 348H5, 413H5, 431H5, 437H5, 441H5/442H5, 457H5
include 60% in
Program #8 ERMAJ1688 Computer Science
Rationale for change:
Programs - Other Changes
10
Sciences
Many of the notes for the Computer Science Major, Specialist, and Minor and the Information Security
Specialist should be identical, but they have diverged over time and are being printed multiple times (below
each program''s table of courses). We wish to collect these notes in a single location to make them easier to
find and update, and we have asked that they be added to the introduction to the CSC programs entry in the
calendar.
Before:
- All CSC programs have a writing requirement. The
recommended course to satisfy that requirement is CSC290H5. If
a student wishes to substitute another course to satisfy the
writing requirement, the student should consult the CSC faculty
advisor.
- Students enrolled in this program may participate in the PEY
program. For more information visit www.pey.utoronto.ca
After:
Program #9 ERMAJ1883 Exceptionality in Human Learning (Science)
Rationale for change:
All programs offered by the Department of Psychology lead to the B.Sc. Degree and require a 2nd year
course in statistics as well as 2nd and/or 3rd year courses in brain and behaviour. Our current students are
ill prepared in both areas resulting in a high failure and drop rate in courses such as PSY201H. Psychology
increasingly focuses on the biological basis of behaviour even in areas that have been studied primarily by
social scientists. Fields such as personality, social behaviour, and parenting now involve genetic
components as well as imaging of the live brain during cognitive tasks to better understand the biological
mechanisms that underlie behaviour. We are also interested in synchronizing our admission requirements
with those of other B.Sc. programs in Psychology including St. George. Most require Biology and more
advanced math than what we currently require.
Before:
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment in this program is limited to students who have:
- completed any Gr.12(4U) Mathematics or equivalent;
- completed 4.0 credits;
- a grade of at least 63% in PSY100Y5;
- successfully completed 1.0 credit from BIO152H5/153H5/204H5/205H5/206H5/207H5; and
- a minimum CGPA of 2.00. Students not initially meeting these requirements may be admissible after
meeting the second-year requirements. Further information is available on the Psychology Department
website: www.utm.utoronto.ca/psychology
After:
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment in this program is limited to students who have:
- completed any Gr.12(4U) Mathematics or equivalent*;
- completed 4.0 credits;
- a grade of at least 63% in PSY100Y5;
- successfully completed 1.0 credit from BIO152H5/153H5/204H5/205H5/206H5/207H5; and
* First year students applying to this program
in 2014/15 will be required to have completed Gr.12(4U) Biology
and Advanced Functions or equivalent. Students not initially meeting these
- a minimum CGPA of 2.00.
requirements may be admissible after meeting the second-year requirements. Further information is
available on the Psychology Department website: www.utm.utoronto.ca/psychology
Program #10 ERMAJ2070 Geography (Science)
Rationale for change:
This change is in response to the elimination of GGR117Y with the replacement of GGR111H5 and
GGR112H5.
Before:
First Year 1.0 credits:
GGR117Y5
First Year 1.0 credits:
GGR111H5 & GGR112H5
After:
Program #11 ERMAJ2364 Biology (Science)
Programs - Other Changes
11
Sciences
Rationale for change:
Not all St. George life science courses have equivalents to UTM BIO courses and not all are acceptable for
BIO credit. This note will help guide students to seek consultation to ensure the courses they are looking at
taking will be appropriate for their program and/ or as pre-requisites for upper year courses.
Before:
7.0 credits are required including at least 2.0 at the 300/400 level.
- (CHM110H5, 120H5)/ CHM140Y5; MAT134Y5*/ 135Y5/ 137Y5
- BIO152H5, 153H5, 204H5, 205H5, 206H5, 207H5
- 2.0 in Biology from the 300 or 400 level. *MAT134Y5 - Calculus for Life Sciences is highly recommended.
Notes:
- Students should be aware of the distinct credit requirement for their degree (see section 8.6 - HBSc
Degree Requirements for full details). Completion of this program with another non-specialist Biology
program will not satisfy the min. 12.0 distinct credit requirement for a degree. Please choose programs and
courses accordingly.
- Although BIO215H5 is not required for a Biology Major, it is a prerequisite for many cell and molecular
courses at the 300 level. Students should consider carefully which 300/400 level courses they intend to take.
- PSL201Y1, offered on the St. George campus, will not meet the Physiology requirements for the Biology
Major program and may not be substituted for BIO204H5.
- Students may take no more than 2.0 credits combined in ROP, Individual
courses at the 300/400-level for credit toward their Biology program.
After:
Projects or Thesis
7.0 credits are required including at least 2.0 at the 300/400 level.
- (CHM110H5, 120H5)/ CHM140Y5; MAT134Y5*/ 135Y5/ 137Y5
- BIO152H5, 153H5, 204H5, 205H5, 206H5, 207H5
- 2.0 in Biology from the 300 or 400 level. *MAT134Y5 - Calculus for Life Sciences is highly recommended.
Notes:
- Students should be aware of the distinct credit requirement for their degree (see section 8.6 - HBSc
Degree Requirements for full details). Completion of this program with another non-specialist Biology
program will not satisfy the min. 12.0 distinct credit requirement for a degree. Please choose programs and
courses accordingly.
- Although BIO215H5 is not required for a Biology Major, it is a prerequisite for many cell and molecular
courses at the 300 level. Students should consider carefully which 300/400 level courses they intend to take.
- PSL201Y1, offered on the St. George campus, will not meet the Physiology requirements for the Biology
Major program and may not be substituted for BIO204H5.
Internship Program, or
Individual Project / Thesis courses at the 300/400-level for credit toward their Biology
program.
- Students must consult with the Undergraduate Advisor before
enrolling in any St. George course that they wish to use for
credit toward any Biology program.
- Students may take no more than 2.0 credits combined in ROP,
Program #12 ERMAJ2511 Mathematical Sciences (Science)
Rationale for change:
These requirements are necessary for students to succeed in our upper level courses.
Change: Under “Higher years”, Item 1: change 378H5/392H5 to 378H5/392H5/405H5, and change
315H5/344H5 to 302H5/315H5/344H5.
Rationale: we are giving more flexibility.
Change: Under “Second year”, change 232H5 to 232H5/233H5.
Rationale: MAT233H5 can be accepted instead of MAT232H5.
Before:
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment in the Major program is limited to students
with 60% in MAT102H5 and
MAT134Y5/135Y5/137Y5.
Second Year MAT202H5, 224H5, 232H5, 242H5
60% in
Higher Years
- MAT301H5, 334H5,
378H5/392H5 (*MAT392H5 is recommended for CTEP students), 402H5,
252H5/311H5/332H5/368H5, 315H5/344H5
- STA257H5/0.5 MAT credit at the 300+ level
After:
who meet the
following criteria: (1) A minimum of 4.0 credits, including 60% in
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment in the Major program is limited to students
Programs - Other Changes
12
Sciences
MAT134Y5/ MAT135Y5/ MAT137Y5. (2) A minimum
cumulative grade point average (CGPA), to be determined
annually.
Second Year MAT202H5, 224H5, 232H5/233H5, 242H5
MAT102H5 and 60% in
Higher Years
378H5/392H5/405H5 (*MAT392H5 is recommended for CTEP students),
402H5, 252H5/311H5/332H5/368H5, 302H5/315H5/344H5
- MAT301H5, 334H5,
- STA257H5/0.5 MAT credit at the 300+ level
Program #13 ERMIN0305 Geographical Information Systems (Science)
Rationale for change:
This change is in response to the elimination of GGR117Y with the replacement of GGR111H5 and
GGR112H5.
Before:
First Year 1.0 credit :
GGR117Y5
First Year 1.0 credit :
GGR111H5 & GGR112H5
After:
Program #14 ERMIN1061 Environmental Science (Science)
Rationale for change:
These are all responses to known changes to other department’s courses.
Before:
Upper Years: 1.0 credit
- Field, Experiential & Research Perspectives: 0.5 credit chosen from this list: ANT318H5;
BIO301H5,
302H5, 313H5, 316H5, 329H5; ERS325H5; ENV299Y5, 399Y5; GGR317H5 (with field trip
option), 379H5; SCI398H5; or another program-relevant Field, Experiential, or Research course, with
permission of the Program Advisor
- Biogeochemical Perspectives: 0.5 credit chosen from this list: BIO311H5, 330H5, 333H5, 373H5;
CHM311H5, 333H5, 347H5, 361H5, 362H5, 391H5, 393H5; ENV490H5, 491H5 (in years when these
Special Topics courses are offered in a SCI format); ERS315H5, 321H5; GGR305H5, 307H5, 309H5,
311H5, 312H5, 315H5, 316H5, 317H5, 321H5, 337H5, 338H5, 372H5, 375H5, 377H5, 378H5; PHY331H5,
332H5
After:
Upper Years: 1.0 credit
- Field, Experiential & Research Perspectives: 0.5 credit chosen from this list: ANT318H5;
BIO313H5,
329H5, 416H5; ERS325H5; ENV299Y5, 399Y5; GGR317H5 (with field trip option), 379H5;
SCI395H5, 396H5; or another program-relevant Field, Experiential, or Research course, with
permission of the Program Advisor
- Biogeochemical Perspectives: 0.5 credit chosen from this list: BIO311H5, 330H5, 333H5, 373H5;
CHM311H5, 333H5, 347H5, 361H5, 362H5, 391H5, 393H5; ENV490H5, 491H5 (in years when these
Special Topics courses are offered in a SCI format); ERS315H5, 321H5; GGR305H5, 307H5, 309H5,
311H5, 312H5, 315H5, 316H5, 317H5, 321H5, 337H5, 338H5, 372H5, 375H5, 377H5, 378H5; PHY331H5,
332H5
Program #15 ERMIN1160 Psychology (Science)
Rationale for change:
All programs offered by the Department of Psychology lead to the B.Sc. Degree and require a 2nd year
course in statistics as well as 2nd and/or 3rd year courses in brain and behaviour. Our current students are
ill prepared in both areas resulting in a high failure and drop rate in courses such as PSY201H. Psychology
increasingly focuses on the biological basis of behaviour even in areas that have been studied primarily by
social scientists. Fields such as personality, social behaviour, and parenting now involve genetic
components as well as imaging of the live brain during cognitive tasks to better understand the biological
mechanisms that underlie behaviour. We are also interested in synchronizing our admission requirements
Programs - Other Changes
13
Sciences
with those of other B.Sc. programs in Psychology including St. George. Most require Biology and more
advanced math than what we currently require
Before:
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment in this program is limited to students who have:
- completed any Gr.12(4U) Mathematics or equivalent;
- completed 4.0 credits;
- a grade of at least 63% in PSY100Y5; and
- a minimum CGPA of 2.0 Students not initially meeting these requirements may be admissible after meeting
the second-year requirements. Further information is available on the Psychology Department web site:
www.utm.utoronto.ca/psychology
After:
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment in this program is limited to students who have:
- completed any Gr.12(4U) Mathematics or
- completed 4.0 credits;
- a grade of at least 63% in PSY100Y5; and
equivalent*;
* First year students applying to this program in
2014/15 will be required to have completed Gr.12(4U) Biology and
Advanced Functions or equivalent. Students not initially meeting these requirements
- a minimum CGPA of 2.0
may be admissible after meeting the second-year requirements. Further information is available on the
Psychology Department web site: www.utm.utoronto.ca/psychology
Program #16 ERMIN1376 Chemistry (Science)
Rationale for change:
In the Limited Enrolment description for all Chemistry programs, we are changing the first year Chemistry
mark requirement so that rather than requiring a specific mark in both CHM110 and CHM120, we will now
require that same mark ONLY in CHM120. Rationale (for all programs): Many students struggle with the
transition from high school to university. In order to allow them more time to adjust to university life before
assessing their eligibility for CHM programs, we will consider their mark only from the second first year CHM
course, CHM120, rather than both CHM110 and CHM120.
Before:
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment in the Chemistry Minor Program is based on completion of 4.0 credits
including CHM140Y5/(110H5,120H5) (minimum grade of
MAT134Y5/135Y5/137Y5
After:
60%) and
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment in the Chemistry Minor Program is based on completion of 4.0 credits
CHM140Y5(minimum grade of 60%)/(110H5,120H5) (minimum grade
60% in CHM120H5) and MAT134Y5/135Y5/137Y5
including
of
Program #17 ERMIN1540 Statistics, Applied (Science)
Rationale for change:
Calculus is a hidden prerequisite; don’t need the linear algebra for the minor.
Lots of students misinterpret existing program description, missing the college requirement for a minor,
thinking they can complete the stats minor with 0.5 300/400 level credits; deleted point references hidden
prerequisites; courses renumbering.
Before:
4.0 credits are required. Notes:
- Course listed under second or third year with a single asterisks (*) must be completed prior to registration
in STA257H5.
**STA331H5 and STA332H5 must be taken after STA258H5 has been completed.
a number of courses in this program have MAT
prerequisites.
-
- Please note that
- ECO220Y5 cannot be substituted for STA257H5 and/or STA258H5 and/or STA261H5. ECO227Y5 can be
substituted for STA257H5 and 258H5, but not for STA261H5.
First Year MAT223H5
Second or Third Year (STA220H5, 221H5)*/(PSY201H5, 202H5)*/(BIO360H5, 361H5)*/(SOC350H5,
351H5)/ECO220Y5*/(STA331H5,332H5)**
After:
4.5 credits are required. Notes:
- Course listed under second or third year with a single asterisks (*) must be completed prior to registration
in STA257H5.
Programs - Other Changes
14
Sciences
- **STA302H5/331H5 and
completed.
STA305H5/332H5 must be taken after STA258H5 has been
- Please note that 1.0 credits at 300/400 level, is required.
- ECO220Y5 cannot be substituted for STA257H5 and/or STA258H5 and/or STA261H5. ECO227Y5 can be
substituted for STA257H5 and 258H5, but not for STA261H5.
First Year (4.5 Credits) MAT137Y5/135Y5/134Y5/133Y5
Second or Third Year (STA220H5, 221H5)*/(PSY201H5, 202H5)*/(BIO360H5, 361H5)*/(SOC350H5,
351H5)/ECO220Y5*/(STA302H5/331H5,305H5/332H5)**
Program #18 ERMIN1688 Computer Science
Rationale for change:
The specialist and major programs are deregulated fee programs, so allowing students to complete those
degrees in all but name would not be fair to students in those programs and may decrease interest in our
specialist and major programs. The 1.5 credit cutoff allows minor students to take one additional course over
the required number for the minor. This restriction is the same as the downtown campus.
Initially, we were concerned that restricting enrollment in this way will decrease enrollment in our programs,
as some students delay entering the major/specialist until the end of their last year to avoid incurring the
fees. However, our records indicate that very few students switch from a regulated (normal tuition) to a
deregulated (increased tuition) fee program in their last year.
Before:
Notes:
After:
- In order to complete this program, you must have completed Grade
12 Advanced Functions (MHF4U) or equivalent, which is a
prerequisite for MAT102H5.
Notes: Students in the CSC minor may only complete 1.5 credits of
third and fourth year computer science courses. To enrol in
additional upper year courses, a student must enter a CSC specialist
or major program.
Program #19 ERMIN2070 Geography (Science)
Rationale for change:
1) GGR111 + GGR112 is in response to the elimination of GGR117Y. 2) The previous requirement of 2.0
credits from any GGR Science courses was found not to adequately prepare students in the minor program,
and may have prevented students from taking a sufficiently integrated and complementary mix of upper-year
geography courses toward the minor requirements. The change fixes these issues. Previously students
could take all second year courses and complete the program. The revision now requires at least 1.0 at the
300/400 level.
Before:
First Year 1.0 credit :GGR117Y5
Second Year 1.0 credit from GGR214H5, 217H5, 227H5
2.0 additional credits from the list of GGR Science courses as described in the Geography Course
Descriptions section of this
calendar.
After:
First Year 1.0 credit :GGR111H5 & GGR112H5
Second Year 1.0 credit from GGR214H5, 217H5, 227H5
2.0 additional credits from the list of GGR Science courses as described in the Geography Course
Descriptions section of this
calendar, including at least 1.0 credit at the
300/400 level.
Program #20 ERSPE0105 Anthropology (Science)
Rationale for change:
These controls were useful at time when Anthropology had few faculty members but now we have a
significant complement. In addition we found that required lab courses were oversubscribed but given the
Programs - Other Changes
15
Sciences
new lab space being developed, this should not be an issue any longer. We also believe that this will allow
enrollments to rise in classes that currently have low enrollment. Finally, we feel that many students mature
intellectually during their 2nd year and in their 3rd year. The current controls eliminate such students from
the potential enjoyment of, and being informed by, our exciting discipline. Furthermore, given that 50% is a
passing grade, these students should have access to upper year courses as part of a Major in Anthropology.
In addition the department will introduce that ANT200Y5Y be divided into 2 half courses. The second half of
ANT200Y will be introduced as a new course. As result the program requirements need to be amended to
reflect the new course changes.
Before:
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment in this program is limited. To qualify, students must have completed 4.0
credits (including ANT101H5 and ANT102H5),
achieved at least 65% in both
ANT101H5 and ANT102H5, and achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.00.
Students applying to enrol after second year must have completed 8.0 credits, achieved at least
65% in each of ANT200Y5, 203Y5, 204H5/206H5/207H5, and achieved a
CGPA of at least 2.00.
Second Year 1. ANT200Y5, 203Y5
2. ANT204H5 and 0.5 from ANT206H5/207H5/208H5/209H5
After:
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment in this program is limited. To qualify, students must have completed 4.0
credits (including ANT101H5 and ANT102H5), and achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least
2.00. Students applying to enrol after second year must have completed 8.0 credits, and achieved a CGPA
of at least 2.00.
Second Year 1. ANT(200H5, 201H5), 203Y5
2. ANT204H5 and 0.5 from ANT206H5/207H5/208H5/209H5
Program #21 ERSPE0482 Comparative Physiology (Science)
Rationale for change:
Not all St. George life science courses have equivalents to UTM BIO courses and not all are acceptable for
BIO credit. This note will help guide students to seek consultation to ensure the courses they are looking at
taking will be appropriate for their program and/ or as pre-requisites for upper year courses.
Before:
14 credits are required, including at least 5.0 at the 300/400 level, of which 1.0
must be at the 400 level.Students may take no more than 2.0 credits combined in ROP,
Individual Projects or Thesis courses at the 300/400-level for credit toward their Biology program.
Within an Honours degree, 14.0 credits are required, including at least 5.0 at the 300/400 level, of which
1.0 must be at the 400 level.No substitute statistics course will be allowed
for BIO360H5. Students may take no more than 2.0 credits combined in ROP,
Internship Program, or Individual Project / Thesis courses at the 300/400-level for
credit toward their Biology program. Students must consult with the
Undergraduate Advisor before enrolling in any St. George course
that they wish to use for credit toward any Biology program.
After:
Within an Honours degree,
Program #22 ERSPE1020 Ecology and Evolution (Science)
Rationale for change:
1. Changes in 300/400-level credit requirement more accurately reflect course requirements within program
as well as recent changes to courses (i.e. field course re-numbered to 400-level). 2. Not all St. George life
science courses have equivalents to UTM BIO courses and not all are acceptable for BIO credit. This note
will help guide students to seek consultation to ensure the courses they are looking at taking will be
appropriate for their program and/ or as pre-requisites for upper year courses. 3. Amendment of 'core
eco/evo' course list reflects new additions and deletions to our course offerings - BIO442H5 is being deleted
and replaced with a new course, BIO445H5 (Evolutionary Ecology, proposed for 2012-2013). This new
course will be an option to all Ecology and Evolution Specialist students.
Before:
Within an honours degree, 13.5 full course equivalents are required, including at least
5.0 at 300/400
1.0 full course must be at the 400 level.Students may take no more than 2.0
credits combined in ROP, Individual Projects or Thesis courses at the 300/400-level for credit
level, of which
toward their Biology program.
Third and Fourth years
- BIO313H5 and BIO342H5
Programs - Other Changes
16
Sciences
- BIO360H5
- 1.0 credit from courses in organismal biology: BIO325H5, 338H5, 335H5, 354H5, 356H5, 370Y5
- 0.5 credit from field courses: BIO316H5, other OUPFB** Field Courses (P.I.)
- 2.5 credits from core ecology/evolutionary biology courses: BIO311H5, 329H5, 330H5, 333H5*, 339H5*,
341H5, 361H5, 373H5, 406H5, 442H5, 443H5, 464H5, GGR312H5
- 1.0 credits from other biology courses: BIO215H5, 310H5, 312H5, 318Y5, 371H5, 372H5, 407H5, 409H5,
410H5, 434H5, 481Y5
- 1.0 credit from related courses from other departments: BIO314H5; MAT212H5, 222H5, 232H5;
STA302H5, 322H5; GGR227H5, 278H5 (formerly GGR261), GGR305H5, 307H5, 309H5, 311H5, or from
courses listed in #4, #5 and #6
* Offered in alternate years
** Ontario Universities Program in Field Biology
After:
6.0 at 300/400
level, of which 1.5 full course must be at the 400 level.No substitute statistics
course will be allowed for BIO360H5. Students may take no more than 2.0
credits combined in ROP, Internship Program, or Individual Project / Thesis
courses at the 300/400-level for credit toward their Biology program. Students must
consult with the Undergraduate Advisor before enrolling in any
St. George course that they wish to use for credit toward any
Biology program.
Within an honours degree, 13.5 full course equivalents are required, including at least
Third and Fourth years
- BIO313H5 and BIO342H5
- BIO360H5
- 1.0 credit from courses in organismal biology: BIO325H5, 338H5, 335H5, 354H5, 356H5, 370Y5
- 0.5 credit from field courses: BIO316H5, other OUPFB** Field Courses (P.I.)
- 2.5 credits from core ecology/evolutionary biology courses: BIO311H5, 329H5, 330H5, 333H5*, 339H5*,
341H5, 361H5, 373H5, 406H5, 445H5, 443H5, 464H5, GGR312H5
- 1.0 credits from other biology courses: BIO215H5, 310H5, 312H5, 318Y5, 371H5, 372H5, 407H5, 409H5,
410H5, 434H5, 481Y5
- 1.0 credit from related courses from other departments: BIO314H5; MAT212H5, 222H5, 232H5;
STA302H5, 322H5; GGR227H5, 278H5 (formerly GGR261), GGR305H5, 307H5, 309H5, 311H5, or from
courses listed in #4, #5 and #6
* Offered in alternate years
** Ontario Universities Program in Field Biology
Program #23 ERSPE1025 Astronomical Sciences (Science)
Rationale for change:
Year 2: Added PHY242H5/JCP221H5 Year 3: PHY347H5 replaces PHY247H5, which is no longer taught
PHY325H5 replaces PHY341H5, which is no longer taught Year 4: JCP421H5 replaces PHY351H1, which
is no longer taught PHY451H5 is explicitly listed instead of making it a student option STA257H5 is added
as an option to STA220H5 Comment: Add PHY242H5, a core course that has been added to the UTM
physics courses since the AST requirements were last updated (consistent with the St. George AST
program, which also requires thermal physics); also added JCP221H5 as an option (another thermal physics
course) Comment: PHY347H5 replaces PHY247H5, which is no longer taught. PHY325H5 (which is a
prerequisite for JCP421H5 and PHY451H5) replaces PHY341H5, which is no longer taught. Comment: Add
PHY242H5, a core course that has been added to the UTM physics courses since the AST requirements
were last updated (consistent with the St. George AST program, which also requires thermal physics); also
added JCP221H5 as an option (another thermal physics course) Comment: PHY347H5 replaces
PHY247H5, which is no longer taught. PHY325H5 (which is a prerequisite for JCP421H5 and PHY451H5)
replaces PHY341H5, which is no longer taught.
Before:
Second Year AST221H1(G), 222H1(G);
245H5
MAT242H5, 232H5/233H5, 368H5; PHY241H5,
PHY247H5, 341H5
PHY351H1(G), STA220H5, and two 300/400-level half-course
Third Year AST320H1(G); JCP321H5, 322H5; MAT311H5, 334H5;
Fourth Year AST425Y1(G);
approved by the faculty advisor.
After:
Second Year AST221H1(G), 222H1(G);
Programs - Other Changes
MAT232H5/233H5, 242H5, 368H5; PHY241H5,
17
Sciences
242H5/JCP221H5, 245H5
PHY325H5, 347H5
JCP421H5, PHY451H5, STA220H5/257H5, and two
Third Year AST320H1(G); JCP321H5, 322H5; MAT311H5, 334H5;
Fourth Year AST425Y1(G);
300/400-level half-course approved by the faculty advisor.
Program #24 ERSPE1038 Information Security (Science)
Rationale for change:
Collecting all information in a single location makes it easier to find and to keep updated.
The second year contained 4.5 credits worth of courses. Moving MAT223 to the first year better balances
those two years.
CSC358 is a networking option that will be offered in years that CSC458 is not offered. It covers sufficient
network material for the program.
Before:
- This specialist program has a writing requirement. The
recommended course to satisfy that requirement is CSC290H5. If
a student wishes to substitute another course to satisfy the
writing requirement, the student should consult the Computer
Science Faculty Advisor.
- Students enrolled in this program may participate in the PEY
program. For more information visit www.pey.utoronto.ca
First Year CSC108H5, 148H5, 290H5; MAT102H5, 134Y5/135Y5/137Y5
Second Year CSC207H5, 209H5, 236H5, 258H5, 263H5; MAT223H5, 224H5, 232H5; STA257H5
Third and Fourth Years CSC458H5; two of (CSC422H5, 423H5, 427H5, 490H5);
After:
134Y5/135Y5/137Y5, 223H5
MAT224H5, 232H5; STA257H5
CSC358H5/458H5; two of (CSC422H5, 423H5, 427H5, 490H5);
First Year CSC108H5, 148H5, 290H5; MAT102H5,
Second Year CSC207H5, 209H5, 236H5, 258H5, 263H5;
Third and Fourth Years
Program #25 ERSPE1061 Environmental Science (Science)
Rationale for change:
These are all responses to known changes to other department’s courses.
Before:
First Year: 4.0 credits
- Introduction: ENV100Y5
- Quantitative Foundation: 1.0 credit chosen from this list: CSC108H5, 148H5; MAT134Y5, 135Y5, 137Y5
- Basic Scientific Foundation: 2.0 credits chosen from this list: ANT101H5; BIO152H5, 153H5; ERS103H5,
120H5; CHM140Y5, 110H5, 120H5; GGR117Y5; PHY135Y5, 136H5, 137H5
Be sure to look ahead and plan to complete the prerequisites for any upper-level courses that are of interest
to you.
Second Year: 4.0 credits
- Biological & Ecological Perspectives: 0.5 credit chosen from this list: BIO200H5, 204H5, 205H5, 206H5,
215H5
- Geographical Perspectives: 1.0 credit chosen from this list: ENV201H5; GGR214H5, 217H5, 227H5
- Earth Science Perspectives: ERS201H5
- Physical & Chemical Perspectives: 1.0 credit chosen from this list: CHM221H5, 231H5, 242H5;
ERS202H5, 203H5; PHY237H5
- Analytical & Research Methods: 1.0 credit chosen from this list: BIO360H5, 361H5; CHM211H5;
ENV232H5; GGR276H5, 277H5, 278H5, 337H5, 380H5; STA220H5, 221H5; or another program-relevant
200/300-level Research Methods course (SCI), with permission of the Program Advisor
Upper Years: 4.0 credits
- Field Perspectives: 1.0 credit chosen from this list: ANT318H5;
Programs - Other Changes
18
BIO301H5, 302H5, 313H5,
Sciences
316H5, 329H5; ERS325H5; ENV331H5; GGR317H5 (with field-trip option), 379H5, 390H1; or
another program-relevant Field course (SCI), with permission of the Program Advisor
- Experiential & Research Perspectives: 1.0 credit chosen from this list: BIO400Y5; ENV399Y5, 400Y5,
497H5, 498Y5; GGR417Y5; SCI398H5, 498H5, 499H5; or another program-relevant Experiential or
Research course (SCI), with permission of the Program Advisor
- Biogeochemical Perspectives: 1.5 credits chosen from this list: BIO311H5, 312H5, 316H5, 318Y5, 328H5,
330H5, 333H5, 373H5, 405H5, 406H5, 436H5, 464H5; CHM310H1, 311H5, 331H5, 347H5, 361H5, 362H5,
391H5, 393H5, 416H5; ENV315H1, 393H5, 490H5, 491H5; ERS315H5, 321H5; GGR305H5, 307H5,
309H5, 311H5, 312H5, 315H5, 316H5, 317H5, 321H5, 337H5, 338H5, 372H5, 375H5, 377H5, 378H5,
403H1, 406H5, 407H5, 409H1, 413H1, 463H5, 464H5, 479H5, 493H5; PHY331H5, 332H5
- Social, Economic & Policy Perspectives: 0.5 credit chosen from this list: ANT357H5, 368H5,
370H5,
457H5; ECO373Y5; ENG259H5; ENV393H5; GGR329H5, 333H5, 345H5, 348H5, 349H5, 361H5,
365H5, 367H5, 369H5, 370H5, 378H5, 380H5; HIS318H5, 319H5; MGT394H5; PHL273H5, 373H1;
POL250Y5, 343Y5; SOC226H5, 319Y5, 339H5, 349H5, 355H5, 356H5; WRI375H5
Note: ENV490H5, 491H5 can substitute for #1, #2, #3, or #4 as course requirements, where appropriate,
and with permission of the Program Advisor or Academic Counsellor.
After:
Note This is intended to be an interdisciplinary program. At least
four different disciplines must be represented among the courses
that are counted as program requirements. For example, a course
list selected from ENV + GGR + HIS + PHL is acceptable, but a
course list selected only from ENV + GGR + HIS is not; a course
list selected from ENV + ENG + ECO + POL is acceptable, but a
course list selected only from ENV + ECO + POL is not. Please
contact the Program Advisors or Academic Counsellor if you
have any questions about the validity of your course selections.
First Year: 4.0 credits
- Introduction: ENV100Y5
- Quantitative Foundation: 1.0 credit chosen from this list: CSC108H5, 148H5; MAT134Y5, 135Y5, 137Y5
- Basic Scientific Foundation: 2.0 credits chosen from this list: ANT101H5; BIO152H5, 153H5; ERS103H5,
120H5; CHM110H5, 120H5; GGR112H5; PHY135Y5, 136H5, 137H5
Be sure to look ahead and plan to complete the prerequisites for any upper-level courses that are of interest
to you.
Second Year: 4.0 credits
- Biological & Ecological Perspectives: 0.5 credit chosen from this list: BIO200H5, 204H5, 205H5, 206H5,
215H5
- Geographical Perspectives: 1.0 credit chosen from this list: ENV201H5; GGR214H5, 217H5, 227H5
- Earth Science Perspectives: ERS201H5
- Physical & Chemical Perspectives: 1.0 credit chosen from this list:
CHM231H5, 242H5;
JCP221H5; ERS202H5, 203H5; PHY237H5
- Analytical & Research Methods: 1.0 credit chosen from this list: BIO360H5, 361H5; CHM211H5;
ENV232H5; GGR276H5, 277H5, 278H5, 337H5, 380H5; STA220H5, 221H5; or another program-relevant
200/300-level Research Methods course (SCI), with permission of the Program Advisor
Upper Years: 4.0 credits
- Field Perspectives: 1.0 credit chosen from this list: ANT318H5; BIO313H5, 329H5, 416H5;
ERS325H5; ENV331H5; GGR317H5 (with field-trip option), 379H5, 390H1; or another program-relevant
Field course (SCI), with permission of the Program Advisor
- Experiential & Research Perspectives: 1.0 credit chosen from this list: BIO400Y5; ENV399Y5, 400Y5,
497H5, 498Y5; GGR417Y5; SCI395H5, 396H5, 498H5, 499H5; or another program-relevant
Experiential or Research course (SCI), with permission of the Program Advisor
- Biogeochemical Perspectives: 1.5 credits chosen from this list: BIO311H5, 312H5, 316H5, 318Y5, 328H5,
330H5, 333H5, 373H5, 405H5, 406H5, 436H5, 464H5; CHM310H1, 311H5, 331H5, 347H5, 361H5, 362H5,
391H5, 393H5, 416H5; ENV315H1, 393H5, 490H5, 491H5; ERS315H5, 321H5; GGR305H5, 307H5,
309H5, 311H5, 312H5, 315H5, 316H5, 317H5, 321H5, 337H5, 338H5, 372H5, 375H5, 377H5, 378H5,
403H1, 406H5, 407H5, 409H1, 413H1, 463H5, 464H5, 479H5, 493H5; PHY331H5, 332H5
- Social, Economic & Policy Perspectives: 0.5 credit chosen from this list: ANT357H5, 368H5, 370H5;
ECO373Y5; ENG259H5; ENV393H5; GGR329H5, 333H5, 345H5, 348H5, 349H5, 361H5, 365H5, 367H5,
369H5, 370H5, 378H5, 380H5; HIS318H5, 319H5; MGT394H5; PHL273H5, 373H1; POL250Y5, 343Y5;
SOC226H5, 339H5, 349H5, 356H5; WRI375H5
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Note: ENV490H5, 491H5 can substitute for #1, #2, #3, or #4 as course requirements, where appropriate,
and with permission of the Program Advisor or Academic Counsellor.
Program #26 ERSPE1118 Biotechnology (Science)
Rationale for change:
1. Not all St. George life science courses have equivalents to UTM BIO courses and not all are acceptable
for BIO credit. This note will help guide students to seek consultation to ensure the courses they are looking
at taking will be appropriate for their program and/ or as pre-requisites for upper year courses. 2. Addition of
BIO375H5 to Third Year Course List reflects addition of new BIO375H5 course (Intro Medical
Biotechnology) for 2012-2013, which will be a course option for all Biotech Specialist students.
Before:
*MAT134Y5 - Calculus for Life Sciences is highly recommended. **Please note that while MGM101H and
102H are listed as first-year courses, students cannot enrol in these courses until they are admitted into the
Specialist Program and therefore will be taking these courses in their 2nd, 3rd or 4th years of study NOTE:
No substitute statistics course will be allowed for BIO360H5. It is recommended that students in this
program consider taking a research project or internship course in either Biology (BIO400Y5/481Y5) or
Chemistry (CHM489Y5). Other 4th-year courses directly relevant to this program are BIO443H5, 477H5,
CHM414H5 and CHM462H5. Students may take no more than 2.0 credits combined in ROP,
Individual Projects or Thesis courses at the 300/400-level for credit toward their Biology program.
Third and Fourth Years
- BIO314H5, 315H5, 360H5, 370Y5, 372H5, 374H5; CHM311H5, 361H5; JBC472H5
- 1.0 credit from: BIO304H5, 310H5, 312H5, 341H5, 380H5, 409H5; CHM333H5 (note: CHM231H5 is
prerequisite for this course), CHM341H5, 345H5, 347H5, 362H5, 371H5
- 1.0 credit from CHM/BIO courses at the 400 level.
After:
*MAT134Y5 - Calculus for Life Sciences is highly recommended. **Please note that while MGM101H and
102H are listed as first-year courses, students cannot enrol in these courses until they are admitted into the
Specialist Program and therefore will be taking these courses in their 2nd, 3rd or 4th years of study NOTE:
No substitute statistics course will be allowed for BIO360H5. It is recommended that students in this
program consider taking a research project or internship course in either Biology (BIO400Y5/481Y5) or
Chemistry (CHM489Y5). Other 4th-year courses directly relevant to this program are BIO443H5, 477H5,
CHM414H5 and CHM462H5. Students may take no more than 2.0 credits combined in ROP,
Internship Program, or Individual Project / Thesis courses at the 300/400-level for
credit toward their Biology program. Students must consult with the
Undergraduate Advisor before enrolling in any St. George course
that they wish to use for credit toward any Biology program.
Third and Fourth Years
- BIO314H5, 315H5, 360H5, 370Y5, 372H5, 374H5; CHM311H5, 361H5; JBC472H5
- 1.0 credit from: BIO304H5, 310H5, 312H5, 341H5, 375H5, 380H5, 409H5; CHM333H5 (note:
CHM231H5 is prerequisite for this course), CHM341H5, 345H5, 347H5, 362H5, 371H5
- 1.0 credit from CHM/BIO courses at the 400 level.
Program #27 ERSPE1160 Psychology (Science)
Rationale for change:
All programs offered by the Department of Psychology lead to the B.Sc. Degree and require a 2nd year
course in statistics as well as 2nd and/or 3rd year courses in brain and behaviour. Our current students are
ill prepared in both areas resulting in a high failure and drop rate in courses such as PSY201H. Psychology
increasingly focuses on the biological basis of behaviour even in areas that have been studied primarily by
social scientists. Fields such as personality, social behaviour, and parenting now involve genetic
components as well as imaging of the live brain during cognitive tasks to better understand the biological
mechanisms that underlie behaviour. We are also interested in synchronizing our admission requirements
with those of other B.Sc. programs in Psychology including St. George. Most require Biology and more
advanced math than what we currently require.
Before:
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment in this program is limited to students who have:
- completed any Gr.12(4U) Mathematics or equivalent;
- completed 8.0 credits;
- at least 77% as the average of PSY201H5, 202H5, and at least 1.5 FCE in 200 series PSY courses; and
- a minimum CGPA of 3.0. Psychology Department website:
www.utm.utoronto.ca/psychologyWithin an honours degree, at least
10.0 credits in Psychology are required. At least 5.0 credits must be at the 300/400 level of which at least
Programs - Other Changes
20
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1.0 must be at the 400 level. A single course can be used to satisfy only one program requirement.
After:
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment in this program is limited to students who have:
- completed any Gr.12(4U) Mathematics or equivalent*;
- completed 8.0 credits;
- at least 77% as the average of PSY201H5, 202H5, and at least 1.5 FCE in 200 series PSY courses; and
* Students applying to this program in 2014/15
will be required to have completed Gr.12(4U) Biology and
Advanced Functions or equivalent. Psychology Department website:
www.utm.utoronto.ca/psychologyAt least 10.0 credits in Psychology are required. At
- a minimum CGPA of 3.0.
least 5.0 credits must be at the 300/400 level of which at least 1.0 must be at the 400 level. A single course
can be used to satisfy only one program requirement.
Program #28 ERSPE1237 Molecular Biology (Science)
Rationale for change:
Addition of BIO375H5 to Third Year Course List reflects addition of new BIO375H5 course (Intro Medical
Biotechnology) for 2012-2013, which will be a course option for all Molecular Bio Specialist students.
Before:
Third Year BIO314H5, 315H5, 360H5, 370Y5, 372H5; CHM361H5, 362H5, 371H5; plus 0.5 of BIO304H5,
310H5, 341H5, 374H5, 380H5; CHM347H5; PHY335H5; BCH335H1, 340H1
After:
Third Year BIO314H5, 315H5, 360H5, 370Y5, 372H5; CHM361H5, 362H5, 371H5; plus 0.5 of BIO304H5,
310H5, 341H5, 374H5,
375H5, 380H5; CHM347H5; PHY335H5; BCH335H1, 340H1
Program #29 ERSPE1338 Forensic Anthropology (Science)
Rationale for change:
Consistency with the proposed change being introduced this year in the Anthropology Program: They are
replacing ANT200Y5 with two half courses (ANT200H5, 201H5) in order to increase flexibility of instructors
teaching the courses and more flexibility for students.
Before:
Limited Enrolment: Admission into the Forensic Science-Anthropology program is by special
application ONLY. To be considered for admission into the program, ALL students, including students
admitted into the 1st year Forensic Science category, MUST submit a direct online FSC Application, upon
completing the minimum requirements. Meeting the minimum requirements does not guarantee admission
into the program. Minimum Requirements:
- Completion of 4.0 credits; including 3.0 science credits.
- Completion of ANT101H5 and ANT102H5 with a grade of at least 75% in each (students applying to enrol
after second year must have completed 8.0 credits and achieved at least 75% in each of ANT200Y5,
ANT203Y5 and ANT205H5 ).
- A minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average of at least 3.0 The actual mimimum CGPA varies from year
to year but is never lower than 3.0 Application for admission into the program for ALL students can be found
at: www.utm.utoronto.ca/forensic Forensic Science Applications Open: March 1 of each year Forensic
Science Application Deadline: May 1 of each year
Second Year
After:
ANT200Y5, 203Y5, 205H5; BIO210Y5; FSC271H5
Limited Enrolment: Admission into the Forensic Anthropology program is by special application
ONLY. To be considered for admission into the program, ALL students, including students admitted into the
1st year Forensic Science category, MUST submit a direct online FSC Application, upon completing the
minimum requirements. Meeting the minimum requirements does not guarantee admission into the program.
Minimum Requirements:
- Completion of 4.0 credits; including 3.0 science credits.
- Completion of ANT101H5 and ANT102H5 with a grade of at least 75% in each (students applying to enrol
after second year must have completed 8.0 credits and achieved at least 75% in each of
ANT200H5,
ANT201H5, ANT203Y5 and ANT205H5 ).
- A minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average of at least 3.0 The actual mimimum CGPA varies from year
to year but is never lower than 3.0 Application for admission into the program for ALL students can be found
at: www.utm.utoronto.ca/forensic Forensic Science Applications Open: March 1 of each year Forensic
Science Application Deadline: May 1 of each year
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21
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Second Year
ANT200H5, ANT201H5, 203Y5, 205H5; BIO210Y5; FSC271H5
Program #30 ERSPE1376 Chemistry (Science)
Rationale for change:
In the Limited Enrolment description for all Chemistry programs, we are changing the first year Chemistry
mark requirement so that rather than requiring a specific mark in both CHM110 and CHM120, we will now
require that same mark ONLY in CHM120. Rationale (for all programs): Many students struggle with the
transition from high school to university. In order to allow them more time to adjust to university life before
assessing their eligibility for CHM programs, we will consider their mark only from the second first year CHM
course, CHM120, rather than both CHM110 and CHM120.
Before:
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment in this Program is restricted. Selection will be based on completion of 4.0
credits including CHM140Y5/(110H5,120H5) (minimum grade of 65%);
MAT134Y5/135Y5/137Y5 (minimum grade of 65%); and a minimum CGPA of 2.5.
Year 3 CHM311H5, 331H5,
Year 4 CHM489Y5;
course(s).
After:
341H5, 345H5, 361H5, 391H5, 393H5; JCP321H5
1.0 400 level CHM/JCP courses, 1.0 300/400 level CHM/JCP or other science
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment in this Program is restricted. Selection will be based on completion of 4.0
credits including
CHM140Y5(minimum grade of 65%)/(110H5,120H5) (minimum
grade of 65% in CHM120H5); MAT134Y5/135Y5/137Y5 (minimum grade of 65%); and a
minimum CGPA of 2.5.
Year 3 CHM311H5, 331H5,
Year 4 CHM489Y5;
course(s).
341H5/345H5, 361H5, 391H5, 393H5; JCP321H5
1.5 400 level CHM/JCP courses, 1.0 300/400 level CHM/JCP or other science
Program #31 ERSPE1505 Forensic Psychology (Science)
Rationale for change:
Consistency with the proposed change being introduced this year in the Psychology Program: All programs
offered by the Department of Psychology lead to the B.Sc. Degree and require a 2nd year course in
statistics as well as 2nd and/or 3rd year courses in brain and behaviour. Our current students are ill
prepared in both areas (e.g., many struggle with basic calculations of percentages and don't understand
basic concepts such as cells and membranes). The result is a high failure and drop rate in courses such as
PSY201H. Currently, high school students are not required to take any Biology courses before coming to
study Psychology at UTM. Some of our students have taken no science beyond general Grade 10 science,
which is clearly insufficient. While students currently have to take any Grade 12 math course for admission,
many take Data Management which has proven to be useless according to UTM experts who teach 2nd
year statistics and have a good understanding of the high school math curriculum. A recent evaluation found
a highly significant difference in PSY201 (and STA220) grades (and CGPA) between students who took only
Data Management and those who took the more difficult Advanced Functions course (64.4% vs. 71.7%).
This clearly demonstrates that taking more advanced math in high school is associated with greater success
in second year statistics. This will not require students to take an additional high school course but rather a
different one (students who complete Grade 11 Functions will progress to Grade 12 Advanced Functions
instead of Grade 12 Data Management). Psychology increasingly focuses on the biological basis of
behaviour even in areas that have been studied primarily by social scientists. Fields such as personality,
social behaviour, and parenting now involve genetic components as well as imaging of the live brain during
cognitive tasks to better understand the biological mechanisms that underlie behaviour. We are often asked
why the admission requirements to Psychology at UTM are lower than those at St. George. Psychology has
been part of the Life-Science admission stream for many years on the St. George campus. This is
consistent with admission standards for most B.Sc. programs in psychology throughout the province. This
change will ensure that UTM is not seen as the "easier" place to study psychology compared with St.
George and other universities. We are delaying the implementation of this requirement for three years to
give high school students a chance to prepare. The above mentioned evaluation showed that many of our
strong students already come to UTM with the proposed requirement. We hope that this change will bring to
UTM students who are better prepared to cope with the expectations of the Psychology program.
Before:
Limited Enrolment: Admission into the Forensic Psychology Specialist Program is limited to a relatively small
number of students per year and admission is by special application ONLY. To be considered for admission
into the program, ALL students, including students admitted into the 1st year Forensic Science category,
MUST submit a direct online FSC application, upon completing the 1st year minimum requirements. Meeting
the minimum requirements does not guarantee admission into the program.
class="red">Minimum Requirements:
Programs - Other Changes
22
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- Completion of any
Grd. 12 (4U) Mathematics or equivalent;
- Completion of 8.0 credits
- At least 77% as the average of PSY201H5, 202H5 and at least 1.5 FCE in 200 series PSY courses; and
- A minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average of at least 3.0. The actual minimum CGPA requirement
varies from year to year but is never lower than 3.0 Application for admission into the program for ALL
students can be found at: www.utm.utoronto.ca/forensic Forensic Science Applications Open: March 1 of
each year Forensic Science Application Deadline: May 1 of each year
After:
Limited Enrolment: Admission into the Forensic Psychology Specialist Program is limited to a relatively small
number of students per year and admission is by special application ONLY. To be considered for admission
into the program, ALL students, including students admitted into the 1st year Forensic Science category,
MUST submit a direct online FSC application, upon completing the 1st year minimum requirements. Meeting
the minimum requirements does not guarantee admission into the program.
Minimum
Requirements:
Gr.12(4U) Mathematics or equivalent*;
- Completion of 8.0 credits
- Completion of any
- At least 77% as the average of PSY201H5, 202H5 and at least 1.5 FCE in 200 series PSY courses; and
- A minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average of at least 3.0. The actual minimum CGPA requirement
3.0
* First year students applying to this program in 2014/15 will be
required to have completed Gr.12(4U) Biology and Advanced
Functions or equivalent.
varies from year to year but is never lower than
Application for admission into the program for ALL students can be found at: www.utm.utoronto.ca/forensic
Forensic Science Applications Open: March 1 of each year Forensic Science Application Deadline: May 1 of
each year
Program #32 ERSPE1540 Statistics, Applied (Science)
Rationale for change:
This aligns the stats specialist enrolment criteria with those for the UTM math specialist; quasi-aligns UTM
with StG where stats specialists requires completion 4.0 courses all at 50% (but only accepts MAT137Y1);
StG does not offer any 100 level stats courses; STA107H5 is not a prereq for any other course, but CS &
math both require their specialist & majors to complete STA257H5, also economics accepts
STA257H+STA258H as equivalent to ECO227Y – so many good students don’t take STA107H, and we
don’t want to exclude them from our programs; Course renumbering.
Before:
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment in the Specialist program is limited to students with a minimum of 4.0 courses
MAT223H5; 65% in STA107H5; and 60% in MAT137Y5 or
MAT233H5 or 65% in MAT134Y5/135Y5.
Third Year MAT378H5; STA322H5/304H5/304H1, 331H5, 332H5, 348H5
Third and Fourth Years STA413H5; three of STA312H5/313H5, 413H5, 431H5, 437H5, 442H5,
to include at least 60% in
60% in
457H5; 1.5 credits from (CSC411H5; MAT332H5, 334H5, 344H5, 368H5; any STA courses except
STA218H5, 220H5, 221H5)
After:
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment in the Specialist program is limited to students with a minimum of 4.0 courses
STA107H5 or 60% in STA257H5; and MAT137Y5 or 60% in
MAT135Y5/134Y5 or 75% in MAT133H5; a minimum cumulative grade
point average, to be determined annually.
Third Year MAT378H5; STA322H5/304H5/304H1, 302H5/331H5, 305H5/332H5, 348H5
Third and Fourth Years STA413H5; three of STA312H5/313H5, 431H5, 437H5, 441H5/442H5,
to include at least 60% in
457H5; 1.5 credits from (CSC411H5; MAT332H5, 334H5, 344H5, 368H5; any STA courses except
STA218H5, 220H5, 221H5)
Program #33 ERSPE1688 Computer Science (Science)
Rationale for change:
Many of the notes for the Computer Science Major, Specialist, and Minor and the Information Security
Specialist should be identical, but they have diverged over time and are being printed multiple times (below
Programs - Other Changes
23
Sciences
each program''s table of courses). We wish to collect these notes in a single location to make them easier to
find and update, and we have asked that they be added to the introduction to the CSC programs entry in the
calendar. A parenthesis in the table of courses was misplaced, making it unclear that CSC492/493 do not
count toward the program at all.
Before:
Notes
- All Computer Science programs have a writing requirement. The
recommended course to satisfy that requirement is CSC290H5. If
a student wishes to substitute another course to satisfy the
writing requirement, the student should consult the Computer
Science Faculty Advisor.
- Students in the Computer Science Specialist program are advised to arrange their program so as to
complete the requirement for the Major in Computer Science by the end of the third year.
- Students enrolled in this program may participate in the PEY
program. For more information visit www.pey.utoronto.ca
Third and Fourth Year CSC343H5, 358H5/458H5, 363H5, 369H5, 373H5; Five half courses from any
300/400 level U of T Mississauga CSC courses (including at least 1.0 credit from 400-level
except for CSC492H5 and
After:
courses,
CSC493H5).
Notes: Students in the Computer Science Specialist program are advised to arrange their program so as
to complete the requirement for the Major in Computer Science by the end of the third year.
Third and Fourth Year CSC343H5, 358H5/458H5, 363H5, 369H5, 373H5; Five half courses from any
300/400 level U of T Mississauga CSC courses (including at least 1.0 credit from 400-level
except for CSC492H5 and
courses),
CSC493H5.
Program #34 ERSPE1868 Bioinformatics
Rationale for change:
1. The “Third and Fourth Years” category has been split to indicate which courses must be taken in the
third year.
Rationale: Additional guidance in course scheduling will help students complete the program on time.
2. CHM140Y5 was replaced by CHM110H5, 120H5.
Rationale: The first year chemistry courses have been updated.
3. MAT223H5 was moved from the second year to the third year, and MAT232H5 was moved from the
second year to the third year.
Rationale: These courses can be taken later in the program than originally recommended since no fourth
year math courses are required, and moving these courses to the third year decreases the required first
year load.
4. MAT212H5 was added as an option.
Rationale: The MAT program has introduced a differential equations course targeted at life science
students.
5. BIO478H5 was removed as an option.
Rationale: The course is no longer offered.
6. JBC472H5 and CHM362H5 were removed as options.
Rationale: Both of these courses require significant numbers of prerequisites that are not in the program.
7. At Upper Years (4.5 credits), the last three items are in statistics, and they should now be
STA302H5/331H5, 348H5, 442H5.
Rationale: adding STA302H5/331H5 as a recommended option.
Updates to the notes following the table of required courses:
1. Students need to obtain permission from the instructors to take BIO207H5 without the BIO153H5
prerequisite.
Rationale: The prerequisites of BIO207H5 and of BIO314H5 have changed.
Programs - Other Changes
24
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2. If BIO477H5 is not offered in the fourth year of a student''s studies, he or she must take an additional 0.5
credit from the recommended 400-level courses.
Rationale: BIO478 and BIO443 were removed from this note, since BIO478 is no longer offered and BIO443
is an optional course.
3. Students intending to take CHM361H5 as one of their recommended courses must take CHM243H5 as a
prerequisite course.
Rationale: This makes the CHM243H5 prerequisite explicit.
4. All third and fourth year CSC courses have a writing requirement. The recommended course for satisfying
that requirement is CSC290H5, but students may substitute a different writing course. If a student wishes to
substitute another course to satisfy the writing requirement, the student should consult a Bioinformatics
Faculty Advisor.
Rationale: This makes the writing requirement in CSC3XX courses explicit and offers a means for
completing CSC courses without it.
Before:
(4.5 credits) BIO152H5; CHM140Y5; MAT102H5, 134Y5/135Y5/137Y5,
223H5; CSC108H5, 148H5
First Year
Second Year (4.0 credits) BIO206H5, 207H5, 215H5; CHM242H5; CSC207H5, 236H5, 263H5;
MAT232H5.
Upper Years (6.0 credits) BIO314H5, 372H5, 477H5/478H5; CSC321H5/411H5, 343H5, 373H5;
MAT242H5 (should be taken in 3rd year), 332H5;
STA257H5, 258H5 (must be taken in 3rd year).
which at least 0.5 must be at the
BIO315H5, 341H5, 370Y5, 371H5, 380H5, 443H5, 481Y5; CBJ481Y5; CHM361H5,
362H5; CSC310H5, 338H5, 363H5; JBC472H5; JCP410H5; STA348H5, 442H5
At least 1.0 credit from the following list of recommended courses, of
400-level:
After:
(4.0 credits) BIO152H5; CHM110H5, 120H5; CSC108H5, 148H5;
MAT102H5,
134Y5/135Y5/137Y5
First Year
Second Year (4.0 credits) BIO206H5, 207H5, 215H5; CHM242H5; CSC207H5, 236H5, 263H5;
MAT223H5
Third Year (2.0 credits) MAT212H5/242H5, MAT232H5; STA257H5,
258H5
Upper Years (4.5 credits) BIO314H5, 372H5, 477H5; CSC321H5/411H5, 343H5, 373H5;
MAT332H5
At least 1.0 credit from the following list of recommended courses, of
which at least 0.5 must be at the 400-level:
BIO315H5, 341H5, 370Y5, 371H5, 380H5, 443H5, 481Y5; CBJ481Y5;
CHM361H5; CSC310H5, 338H5, 363H5; JCP410H5; STA302H5/331H5,348H5, 442H5
Notes:
1. Students need to obtain permission from the instructors to
take BIO207H5 without the BIO153H5 prerequisite.
2. If BIO477H5 is not offered in the fourth year of a student's
studies, he or she must take an additional 0.5 credit from the
recommended 400-level courses.
3. Students intending to take CHM361H5 as one of their
recommended courses must take CHM243H5 as a prerequisite
Programs - Other Changes
25
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course.
4. All third and fourth year CSC courses have a writing
requirement. The recommended course for satisfying that
requirement is CSC290H5, but students may substitute a different
writing course. If a student wishes to substitute another course to
satisfy the writing requirement, the student should consult a
Bioinformatics Faculty Advisor.
Program #35 ERSPE1883 Exceptionality in Human Learning (Science)
Rationale for change:
All programs offered by the Department of Psychology lead to the B.Sc. Degree and require a 2nd year
course in statistics as well as 2nd and/or 3rd year courses in brain and behaviour. Our current students are
ill prepared in both areas resulting in a high failure and drop rate in courses such as PSY201H. Psychology
increasingly focuses on the biological basis of behaviour even in areas that have been studied primarily by
social scientists. Fields such as personality, social behaviour, and parenting now involve genetic
components as well as imaging of the live brain during cognitive tasks to better understand the biological
mechanisms that underlie behaviour. We are also interested in synchronizing our admission requirements
with those of other B.Sc. programs in Psychology including St. George. Most require Biology and more
advanced math than what we currently require.
Before:
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment is limited to students who have:
- completed any Gr.12(4U) Mathematics or equivalent;
- completed 8.0 credits;
- at least 75% as the average of PSY201H5, 210H5, 213H5 and at least 1.0 FCE in 200 series
ANT/BIO/SOC courses
- a minimum CGPA of 2.70. Meeting the minimum grade requirements does not guarantee
admission.Within an Honours degree, 13.0 credits are required, including at least
3.5 300/400 level credits and 1.5 400 level credits.
First Year PSY100Y5; (ANT101H5, 102H5)/ (BIO152H5, 153H5)/ SOC100H5/ 1.0 credit from
BIO204H5, 205H5, 206H5, 207H5/ SOC100H5
Second and Higher Years
- 3.0 credits from the following: PSY310H5, 311H5, 312H5, 315H5, 316H5, 318H5, 319H5, 321H5, 325H5,
331H5, 333H5, 340H5, 341H5, 343H5, 344H5, 346H5, 353H5, 374H5, 376H5, 384H5, 385H5, 393H5
- PSY442Y5 and at least 0.5 credit from the following: PSY400Y5, 403H5, 404H5, 405H5, 406H5, 410H5,
415H5, 440H5, 474H5, 495H5
NOTE: Primary Junior CTEP students are exempt from PSY442Y5 and may take PSY345H5 and any 0.5
FCE 400 level course in psychology instead.
- 2.0 credits from one of the following lists:
204Y5, 205H5, 206Y5, 241Y5, 304H5, 306H5, 322H5, 331H5, 332H5, 333H5,
433H5, 434H5, 460H5, 461H5
- SOC209H5, 211H5, 216H5, 244H5, 252H5, 263H5, 284H5, 302H5, 307H5, 310H5, 316H5,
319Y5, 323H5, 332H5, 333H5, 348H5, 356H5, 365H5, 368H5, 371H5, 375H5, 455H5, 456H5
- BIO204H5, 205H5, 206H5, 207H5, 210Y5, 215H5, 304H5, 315H5, 341H5, 370Y5, 371H5, 372H5,
- ANT203Y5,
334H5, 335H5, 339Y5, 362H5, 364H5, 401H5,
380H5, 403H5, 407H5, 443H5, 476H5, 477H5; ANT203Y5, 331H5, 332H5, 334H5, 339Y5; PSL201Y1
NOTE: Students who took SOC100H5 must take 2.5 credits from List 3(b)
- 2.5 additional credits to be selected from the following (no more than 1.0 credit from any one discipline):
ANT Any course in 3(a) not counted previously
SOC Any course in 3(b) not counted previously
BIO Any course in 3(c) not counted previously
CHM CHM242H5, 243H5, 341H5, 345H5, 347H5, 361H5, 362H5, 371H5
ENG ENG234H5
FGI/FRE FGI225Y5, FRE355H5
HIS HIS308H5, 310H5, 326Y5, 338H5
LIN LIN100Y5, 200H5, 256H5, 358H5
JAL JAL253H5, 355H5
PHL PHL243H5, 244H5, 255H5, 267H5, 271H5, 272H5, 274H5, 277Y5, 282H5, 283H5, 290H5, 350H5,
Programs - Other Changes
26
Sciences
355H5, 375H5, 380H5
RLG RLG224H5, 309H5,
SCI SCI395H5, 396H5, 499H5
WGS Any course
After:
314H5
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment is limited to students who have:
- completed any Gr.12(4U) Mathematics or equivalent*;
- completed 8.0 credits;
- at least 75% as the average of PSY201H5, 210H5, 213H5 and at least 1.0 FCE in 200 series
ANT/BIO/SOC courses
* Students applying to this program in 2014/15
will be required to have completed Gr.12(4U) Biology and
Advanced Functions or equivalent. Meeting the minimum grade requirements does not
guarantee admission. Further information is available on the
Psychology Department web site:
www.utm.utoronto.ca/psychology.13.0 credits are required, including at least 3.5
- a minimum CGPA of 2.70.
300/400 level credits and 1.5 400 level credits.
First Year PSY100Y5; (ANT101H5, 102H5)/ (BIO152H5, 153H5)/ 1.0 credit from BIO204H5, 205H5, 206H5,
207H5/ SOC100H5
Second and Higher Years
- 3.0 credits from the following: PSY310H5, 311H5, 312H5, 315H5, 316H5, 318H5, 319H5, 321H5, 325H5,
331H5, 333H5, 340H5, 341H5, 343H5, 344H5, 346H5, 353H5, 374H5, 376H5, 384H5, 385H5, 393H5
- PSY442Y5 and at least 0.5 credit from the following: PSY400Y5, 403H5, 404H5, 405H5, 406H5, 410H5,
415H5, 440H5, 474H5, 495H5
NOTE: Primary Junior CTEP students are exempt from PSY442Y5 and may take PSY345H5 and any 0.5
FCE 400 level course in psychology instead.
- 2.0 credits from one of the following lists:
- ANT203Y5, 204H5, 205H5, 206H5, 207H5, 241Y5, 306H5, 322H5, 331H5, 332H5, 333H5,
334H5, 335H5, 339Y5, 362H5, 364H5, 401H5, 434H5, 460H5, 461H5
- SOC209H5, 211H5, 216H5, 244H5, 263H5, 284H5, 302H5, 307H5, 310H5, 316H5, 323H5, 332H5,
348H5, 356H5, 365H5, 368H5, 371H5, 375H5, 456H5
- BIO204H5, 205H5, 206H5, 207H5, 210Y5, 215H5, 315H5, 341H5, 370Y5, 371H5, 372H5, 380H5, 403H5,
407H5, 443H5, 476H5, 477H5; ANT203Y5, 331H5, 332H5, 333H5, 334H5, 339Y5; PSL201Y1
NOTE: Students who took SOC100H5 must take 2.5 credits from List 3(b)
- 2.5 additional credits to be selected from the following (no more than 1.0 credit from any one discipline):
ANT Any course in 3(a) not counted previously
SOC Any course in 3(b) not counted previously
BIO Any course in 3(c) not counted previously
CHM CHM242H5, 243H5, 341H5, 345H5, 347H5, 361H5, 362H5, 371H5
ENG ENG234H5
FGI/FRE FGI225Y5, FRE355H5
HIS HIS308H5, 310H5, 326Y5, 338H5
LIN LIN100Y5, 200H5, 256H5, 358H5, 380H5
JAL JAL253H5, 355H5
PHL PHL243H5, 244H5, 255H5, 267H5, 271H5, 272H5, 274H5, 277Y5, 282H5, 283H5, 290H5, 350H5,
355H5,
358H5, 375H5, 380H5
RLG RLG314H5
SCI SCI395H5, 396H5, 499H5
WGS Any course
Program #36 ERSPE1995 Biological Chemistry (Science)
Rationale for change:
In the Limited Enrolment description for all Chemistry programs, we are changing the first year Chemistry
mark requirement so that rather than requiring a specific mark in both CHM110 and CHM120, we will now
require that same mark ONLY in CHM120. Rationale (for all programs): Many students struggle with the
transition from high school to university. In order to allow them more time to adjust to university life before
assessing their eligibility for CHM programs, we will consider their mark only from the second first year CHM
Programs - Other Changes
27
Sciences
course, CHM120, rather than both CHM110 and CHM120.
Before:
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment in this program is restricted. Selection will be based on completion of 4.0
credits including CHM140Y5/(110H5,120H5) (minimum grade of 65%);
MAT134Y5/135Y5/137Y5 (minimum grade of 65%); and a minimum CGPA of 2.5. Completion of BIO152H5
is recommended.
Year 3 CHM333H5,
Year 4 CHM489Y5;
After:
341H5, 345H5, 347H5, 361H5, 362H5, 371H5; BIO372H5
0.5 400 level CHM, JBC, JCP or BCH course
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment in this program is restricted. Selection will be based on completion of 4.0
CHM140Y5(minimum grade of 65%)/(110H5,120H5) (minimum
65% in CHM120H5); MAT134Y5/135Y5/137Y5 (minimum grade of 65%); and a
credits including
grade of
minimum CGPA of 2.5. Completion of BIO152H5 is recommended.
Year 3 CHM333H5,
Year 4 CHM489Y5;
341H5/345H5, 347H5, 361H5, 362H5, 371H5; BIO372H5
1.0 400 level CHM, JBC, JCP or BCH course
Program #37 ERSPE2070 Geography (Science)
Rationale for change:
This change is in response to the elimination of GGR117Y with the replacement of GGR111H5 and
GGR112H5.
Before:
First Year 1.0 credit:
GGR117Y5
First Year 1.0 credit:
GGR111H5 & GGR112H5
After:
Program #38 ERSPE2171 Geocomputational Science (Science)
Rationale for change:
This change is in response to the elimination of GGR117Y with the replacement of GGR111H5 and
GGR112H5.
Before:
First Year 3.5 credits from:
CSC108H5, 148H5; MAT102H5, 135Y5/137Y5;
GGR117Y5/ENV100Y5
After:
First Year 3.5 credits from:
CSC108H5, 148H5; MAT102H5, 135Y5/137Y5;
GGR111H5, 112H5/ENV100Y5
Program #39 ERSPE2364 Biology (Science)
Rationale for change:
1. Not all St. George life science courses have equivalents to UTM BIO courses and not all are acceptable
for BIO credit. This note will help guide students to seek consultation to ensure the courses they are looking
at taking will be appropriate for their program and/ or as pre-requisites for upper year courses. 2. Addition of
BIO374H5 and BIO375H5 to Cell, Molecular, and Developmental Biology Stream reflects addition of two
new biotechnology courses (BIO374H5 introduced two years ago; BIO375H5 proposed for 2012-2013). Both
courses are options for Biology Specialist students. 3. Amendment of Genetics and Evolution Stream course
list reflects new additions and deletions to our course offerings - BIO442H5 is being deleted and replaced
with a new course, BIO445H5 (Evolutionary Ecology, proposed for 2012-2013). This new course will be an
option to all Biology Specialist students.
Before:
It is recommended that students in the specialist program include at least 0.5 credit from each of four of the
following groups:
- Ecology and Field Biology: BIO311H5, 312H5, 313H5, 316H5, 329H5, 330H5,
333H5*, 464H5;
PHY335H5
- Biology of Whole Organisms: 325H5, 335H5, 338H5, 354H5, 356H5
- Genetics and Evolution: BIO341H5, 342H5, 407H5,
Programs - Other Changes
28
442H5, 443H5*, 464H5
Sciences
- Cell, Molecular and Developmental Biology: BIO314H5, 315H5, 370Y5, 371H5, 372H5, 380H5, 407H5,
476H5, 477H5; CHM361H5, 362H5.
- Physiology and Behaviour: BIO210Y5, 304H5, 310H5, 312H5, 318Y5, 328H5, 409H5, 410H5, 411H5,
434H5; PHY335H5 *MAT134Y5 - Calculus for Life Sciences is highly recommended. Up to 1.0
credit may be taken from the following biology-related courses: GGR227H5, 305H5, 307H5, 309H5, 311H5,
312H5; CHM347H5, 361H5, 362H5, 371H5;
PHY335Y5; PSY290H5, 355H5, 357H5, 395H5, 397H5;
* Offered in alternate
ANT334H5, 336H5, 340H5. Additional courses: BIO361H5, 481Y5
years
Notes:
- Students wishing to emphasize cell biology, molecular biology, microbiology, physiology or genetics,
should take CHM240Y5/(241H5, 261H5)/(242H5, 243H5) in second year. Such students should take
MAT132Y5/134Y5/135Y5/137Y5, a prerequisite, in their first year.
- No substitute statistics course will be allowed for BIO360H5.
- Students may take no more than 2.0 credits combined in ROP, Individual
courses at the 300/400-level for credit toward their Biology program.
Projects or Thesis
Certain U of T Mississauga Biology courses will be treated as
equivalent to corresponding St. George campus courses in
satisfying requirements for certain St. George specialist programs
related to Biology and Basic Medical Sciences. Students who intend to
begin these programs at U of T Mississauga should consult a
Biology advisor as early as possible.
-
After:
It is recommended that students in the specialist program include at least 0.5 credit from each of four of the
following groups:
- Ecology and Field Biology: BIO311H5, 312H5, 313H5, 316H5, 329H5, 330H5,
- Biology of Whole Organisms: 325H5, 335H5, 338H5, 354H5, 356H5
- Genetics and Evolution: BIO341H5, 342H5, 407H5,
333H5, 464H5
445H5, 443H5, 464H5
- Cell, Molecular and Developmental Biology: BIO314H5, 315H5, 370Y5, 371H5, 372H5,
374H5,
375H5, 380H5, 407H5, 476H5, 477H5
- Physiology and Behaviour: BIO210Y5, 304H5, 310H5, 312H5, 318Y5, 328H5, 409H5, 410H5, 411H5,
434H5 *MAT134Y5 - Calculus for Life Sciences is highly recommended. Up to 1.0 credit may be taken
from the following biology-related courses: GGR227H5, 305H5, 307H5, 309H5, 311H5, 312H5; CHM347H5,
361H5, 362H5, 371H5;
PHY332H5, 333H5; PSY290H5, 355H5, 357H5, 395H5, 397H5;
ANT334H5, 336H5, 340H5. Additional courses: BIO361H5, 481Y5
Notes:
- Students wishing to emphasize cell biology, molecular biology, microbiology, physiology or genetics,
should take CHM240Y5/(241H5, 261H5)/(242H5, 243H5) in second year. Such students should take
MAT134Y5/135Y5/137Y5, a prerequisite, in their first year.
- No substitute statistics course will be allowed for BIO360H5.
Internship Program, or
Individual Project / Thesis courses at the 300/400-level for credit toward their Biology program.
- Students must consult with the Undergraduate Advisor before
enrolling in any St. George course that they wish to use for credit
toward any Biology program.
- Students may take no more than 2.0 credits combined in ROP,
Program #40 ERSPE2470 Behaviour, Genetics, and Neurobiology (Science)
Rationale for change:
Admission requirements are raised to align them with the Specialist Program in Psychology. This program
has attracted poorer students who could not find supervisors for required senior research projects. This
change will ensure that students who qualify for the Specialist program are indeed potential graduate school
bound students who can benefit from the extra resources provided primarily to Specialists (i.e., research
opportunities, guaranteed spots in seminar courses etc.).
Before:
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment is limited to students who have:
- completed 8.0 credits;
- successfully completed BIO152H5, 153H5, CHM140Y5/(110H5, 120H5) and MAT134Y5/135Y5/137Y5;
Programs - Other Changes
29
Sciences
- at least 73% as the average of PSY201H5, 202H5 (or equivalent), and at least 1.0 FCE from:
BIO205H5/206H5/207H5/ PSY252H5/290H5
- a minimum CGPA of 2.50 Within an Honours degree, 11.5 credits are required,
including at least 3.0 300/400 level credits and 1.0 400 level credits.
Third Year 1.0 credit from each of the following three streams:
- Behaviour: BIO318Y5/328H5, PSY316H5, 318H5, 346H5, 351H5, 353H5, 354H5, 355H5, 360H5, 362H5,
385H5, 393H5, 395H5, 397H5, 398H5, 399H5
- Genetics: BIO314H5, 315H5, 341H5, 372H5, 407H5, PSY355H5
- Neurobiology: BIO304H5,
Third year note:
309H5, 310H5, 380H5, PSY318H5, 346H5, 385H5, 393H5, 397H5, 399H5
- Students interested in taking PSY400Y5 are advised to take PSY309H5.
After:
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment is limited to students who have:
- completed 8.0 credits;
- successfully completed BIO152H5, 153H5, CHM140Y5/(110H5, 120H5) and MAT134Y5/135Y5/137Y5;
- at least 77% as the average of PSY201H5, 202H5 (or equivalent), and at least 1.0 FCE from:
BIO205H5/206H5/207H5/ PSY252H5/290H5
- a minimum CGPA of 3.0 11.5 credits are required, including at least 3.0 300/400 level credits and 1.0
400 level credits.
Third Year 1.0 credit from each of the following three streams:
- Behaviour: BIO318Y5/328H5, PSY316H5, 318H5, 346H5, 351H5, 353H5, 354H5, 355H5, 360H5, 362H5,
385H5, 393H5, 395H5, 397H5, 398H5, 399H5
- Genetics: BIO314H5, 315H5, 341H5, 372H5, 407H5,
- Neurobiology: BIO304H5,
Third year note:
476H5, PSY355H5
409H5, 310H5, 380H5, PSY318H5, 346H5, 385H5, 393H5, 397H5, 399H5
- Students interested in taking PSY400Y5 are advised to take PSY309H5.
Program #41 ERSPE2511 Mathematical Sciences (Science)
Rationale for change:
These requirements are necessary for students to succeed in the upper level courses that are required in
the program.
Change: Remove MAT252H5 from the “Second Year requirements”. Add MAT311 to item 1 of the “Third
and Fourth year requirements”.
Rationale: Instead of requiring two courses in Ordinary Differential Equations (MAT242 and MAT252), we
prefer to require one course in Ordinary Differential Equations (MAT242) and one course in Partial
Differential Equations (MAT311).
Change: Add “MAT302H5/MAT315H5” to item 1 of “Third and Fourth year requirements”.
Rationale: We would like to ensure that students take at least one of these courses.
Change: Add MAT402 to item 1 of “Third and Fourth year requirements”.
Rationale: This is the only course in geometry that we currently offer and we would like to ensure that
students be exposed to the subject.
“Third and Fourth year requirements”, item 2: Change to: 1.0 additional credit, chosen from MAT302H5,
309H5, 315H5, 332H5,344H5.
Rationale: removed from this list courses that are becoming required under item 1 of “Third and Fourth
Years”.
“Third and Fourth year requirements”, item 3: Change to: 0.5 additional credits in MAT at the 400 level (405
is recommended).
Rationale: because MAT402 has become mandatory, we only need to require one more 400 level
half-course. MAT405 is essential for students who continue to graduate studies in mathematics. We have
not had enough successful experience with MAT492 (senior thesis) to justify recommending it.
Before:
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment in the Specialist program is limited to students
Programs - Other Changes
30
with 60% in
Sciences
MAT102H5 and
60% in MAT137Y5.
Second Year CSC207H5/209H5/236H5; MAT202H5, 224H5, 232H5,
258H5/261H5
Third & Fourth Years
242H5, 252H5; STA257H5,
MAT334H5, 368H5, 392H5
- Three of MAT302H5, 309H5, 311H5, 315H5, 332H5, 344H5
- 1.0 additional credit in MAT at the 400 level (MAT492H5 is recommended)
-
- 1.5 additional credits at the 300+ level in CSC/MAT/STA
After:
who meet the
following criteria: (1) A minimum of 4.0 credits, including MAT102H5
(60%) and MAT137Y5 (60%). (2) A minimum cumulative grade point
average (CGPA), to be determined annually.
Second Year CSC207H5/209H5/236H5; MAT202H5, 224H5, 232H5, 242H5; STA257H5, 258H5/261H5
Limited Enrolment: Enrolment in the Specialist program is limited to students
Third & Fourth Years
MAT311H5, 334H5, 368H5, 392H5, 302H5/315H5, 402
- 1.0 additional credit, chosen from MAT302H5, 309H5, 315H5, 332H5,
344H5.
- 0.5 additional credits in MAT at the 400 level (405 is recommended).
-
- 1.5 additional credits at the 300+ level in CSC/MAT/STA
Programs - Other Changes
31
Sciences
New Courses
Course #1 ANT201H5 World Prehistory (SCI)
Description:
Survey of human cultural development over 2.5 million years. The course will cover the following topics: the nature
and origins of material culture; the nature and development of hunter-gather-fisher economies; the nature and
development of resource production; and the nature of development of complex societies.
Exclusion:
ANT200Y5
Recommended
Preparation:
ANT101H5
Rationale:
At present, the topics in this half-course are covered in the second term of ANT200Y5. We propose to replace
ANT200Y5 with two half courses in order to increase flexibility of instructors teaching the courses and more
flexibility for students.
No. Hours
Instruction:
24L, 12P
Offered at St
George:
No
Revived Course:
No
Course #2 ANT210H5 Fantasies, Hoaxes and Mispresentations of the Ancient World (SCI)
Description:
The anatomy of significant hoaxes, outrageous claims, and archaeology in popular culture are examined. Why are
these claims so popular? How do we critically evaluate potential hoaxes and fictional accounts of the past? What
role has racism played in these views? This course provides the tools for evaluation of these claims as well as for
the lifetime enjoyment of what is truly exciting about archaeology.
Rationale:
Pseudoarchaeology is popular on television (History Channel, Discovery, PBS etc.), in literature, and in movies.
This course is intended to produce informed students who will not only be able to critically evaluate the
archaeological claims of popular culture but also to provide the tools and perspective for students to enjoy a life
long engagement with the world of archaeology. It will provide a science breadth requirement and should help
Anthropology take on more students. Several other service courses are being offered at the 2nd year in
Anthropology but this will be the first such course in archaeology.
No. Hours
Instruction:
24L
Offered at St
George:
No
Revived Course:
No
Course #3 BIO375H5 Introductory Medical Biotechnology (SCI)
Description:
This course reviews a full range of discoveries from the life sciences, which includes both drugs and medical
devices. The course reviews a range of biotechnology products with respect to: regulatory path for experiments to
support for new biotechnologies; key science concepts behind the technology and the business context. [36L]
Prerequisite:
Completion of 2.0 credits in Biology, plus BIO360H5/ STA220H5/ PSY201H5
Rationale:
This course will build the undergraduate biotechnology specialists program's course offerings and provide a context
for students to understand such courses as BIO476H (Molecular Basis of Disease) in which small disease
populations pose unique challenges for product testing.
No. Hours
Instruction:
36L
Offered at St
George:
No
Revived Course:
No
Course #4 BIO445H5 Evolutionary Ecology (SCI)
Description:
New Courses
This course focuses on the interface between ecology and evolution. Research has shown that biotic and abiotic
ecological factors drive evolution, and in turn, evolution feeds back to influence the ecological processes and
patterns of populations and communities. Throughout this course we will focus on this dynamic interplay over short
and long time spans in animals, plants, fungi, and other microbes. While covering the concepts and questions of
this field we will also consider the theory, methods, and statistics used to bring new insights to evolutionary
ecology. Students will be expected to participate in discussions, present methods and concepts to the class, and
32
Sciences
complete written assignments. [48L]
Exclusion:
EEB324H1
Prerequisite:
BIO205H5, 207H5, 342H5
Rationale:
This course will serve as a capstone to students interested in ecology and evolution, solidifying their understanding
of the concepts and intersection of these fields, while helping to hone their critical thinking skills, their proficiency
with reading and writing in the sciences, as well as their presentation skills.
No. Hours
Instruction:
48L
Offered at St
George:
No
Revived Course:
No
Course #5 CSC322H5 Introduction to Algebraic Cryptography (SCI)
Description:
The course will take students on a journey through the methods of algebra and number theory in cryptography,
from Euclid to Zero Knowledge Proofs. Topics include: block ciphers and the Advanced Encryption Standard
(AES); algebraic and number-theoretic techniques and algorithms in cryptography, including methods for primality
testing and factoring large numbers; encryption and digital signature systems based on RSA, factoring, elliptic
curves and integer lattices; and zero-knowledge proofs. [36L, 12T]
Exclusion:
MAT302H5
Prerequisite:
MAT223H5, 224H5, 301H5
Rationale:
MAT302 is an existing course being taught by a computer science
faculty member. Cross-listing that course in computer science makes it possible for CSC students in all programs
(not just the information security program) to take the course for CSC credit.
No. Hours
Instruction:
36L, 12T
Offered at St
George:
No
Revived Course:
No
Course #6 ENV495H5 Restoration Ecology I (SCI)
Description:
Restoration ecology is an emerging cross-disciplinary field of study that concerns human activities undertaken to
promote the recovery, health, integrity and sustainability of degraded ecosystems. This course introduces the
fundamental concepts of ecological restoration, addressing topics such as assessing ecosystem health, resilience,
resistance and stability; community structure and biodiversity; invasive species; ecosystem processes and
functions; societal aspects of ecological restoration (e.g., the relationship between social, economic and
environmental sustainability). Many types of ecosystems (marine, freshwater, terrestrial, tropical and temperate)
will be studied, largely through case-study investigations. Occasional field exercises on campus will be scheduled
during regular class meeting times. [24L, 12T]
Prerequisite:
ENV100; completion of at least 10 credits. BIO205 is STRONGLY recommended. Preference will be given to
students enrolled in an ENV program
Rationale:
This course fills an important niche for students in environmental science and environmental management, and is
likely to attract students with a background in ecology and biology. It provides a theoretical background to an
applied science, and has an experiential component as well. As a problem-based learning course, it allows
students to develop skills in problem-solving, communication, collaboration and critical analysis of scientific
discourse. The overall goals of this course are to introduce students to the theory and practice of ecological
restoration; to provide a historical context for the current ideas and practices in the discipline; to gain awareness of
current issues and restoration goals at the local, regional and global scales; and to appreciate and begin
developing the skills and resources required to be a successful practitioner in ecological restoration.
No. Hours
Instruction:
Offered at St
George:
No
Revived Course:
No
Course #7 ENV496H5 Restoration Ecology II (SCI)
Description:
New Courses
The follow-up course Restoration Ecology I will build on its theoretical foundations to focus on student involvement
in a variety of restoration projects planned or underway by Credit Valley Conservation and other groups in
Mississauga and the greater Credit Valley watershed. The emphasis here is on planning and implementation of
33
Sciences
restoration projects; good scientific design; understanding policies and procedures; identifying and working with
stakeholders, etc. Occasional field exercises may be scheduled during regular class meeting times. [24L, 12T]
Prerequisite:
ENV495H5(Restoration Ecology I) or permission of the instructor
Rationale:
This course allows students to apply the theoretical principles learned in Restoration Ecology I to current
restoration problems/projects underway in the Credit Valley watershed. Although field opportunities are limited due
to the timing (winter course), this is truly an experiential learning course as the objective is to work in groups to
develop a restoration plan and present it to managers at CVC in a formal presentation day. Plans that are
successful may be adopted by CVC, and students may be able to participate in the implementation of their
restoration plans after the course is completed.
No. Hours
Instruction:
Offered at St
George:
No
Revived Course:
No
Course #8 FSC406H5 Introduction To 3D Crime Scene Mapping And Reconstruction (SCI)
Description:
This course introduces students to both standard and innovative methods of documenting, mapping, analyzing,
and visualizing/reconstructing a crime scene for investigative purposes, including: total stations; laser scanners;
panoramic images; and photogrammetry. Course topics range from basic measurement theory and statistics, to
legal considerations such as admissibility and preparing courtroom-ready visualizations. Students will learn to use
forensic mapping software to create courtroom-ready graphics. [12L, 24P]
Prerequisite:
FSC300H5, FSC302H5
Rationale:
Forensic animations and 3D crime scene reconstructions are becoming more common in courtrooms, raising jury
expectations about how evidence and data are presented. The UTM FSC program is developing a distinct identity
within the forensic science academic community and reasserting our position as the number one forensic science
program in Canada, by building on our strengths in data and evidence visualization through collaborations with the
Biomedical Communications Program. This course will complement existing courses (Visualization of Forensic
Demonstrative Evidence, Digital Forensic Facial Reconstruction) and complete the Forensic Identification courses
that focus on acquiring crime scene data (FSC 300H5, FSC 302H5).
No. Hours
Instruction:
[12L, 24P]
Offered at St
George:
No
Revived Course:
No
(Priority given to Forensic Science Specialists and Majors.)
Course #9 GGR112H5 Physical Geography (SCI)
Description:
This physical geography course introduces earth systems processes occurring in and between the atmosphere,
lithosphere, hydrosphere and the biosphere. It addresses human interaction and interference with the natural
environment and compares natural and anthropogenic environmental changes. Key tools used to understand earth
systems and the natural environment including hands-on empirical approaches, systems models, remote sensing,
and geographical information systems are addressed in both the lectures and the practical sessions. [24L, 12P]
Rationale:
This course introduces the discipline of physical geography. It provides a basic understanding of hydrological,
geological, climatological, and ecological processes and dynamics required for all upper-level geography science
courses. The practical sessions are essential to give students initial experiences with methods in physical
geography that are further built upon in upper level courses. This course is a prerequisite for all students intending
to enrol in a Geography specialist or major programs or a Geography (Sci) minor program.
No. Hours
Instruction:
Offered at St
George:
No
Revived Course:
No
Course #10 JCB487Y5 Advanced Interdisciplinary Research Laboratory (SCI)
Description:
New Courses
Students will work together as members of a multidisciplinary team toward the completion of an interdisciplinary
experimental or theoretical research project. Teams will be comprised of at least three students, with
representation from at least three areas of specialization, namely, astronomy, biology, chemistry, earth sciences or
physics. The interdisciplinary projects will be based on current trends in research and student teams will work to
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complete their projects with guidance provided by a team of faculty advisors from the Biology Department and the
Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences. In addition to the rigorous development of research skills, the
course will also provide students with practical experience in project management and training in effective project
management techniques. [240P]
Exclusion:
BIO481Y5, CBJ481Y5, CHM489Y5, CHM499Y1, PHY489Y5
Prerequisite:
2.0 credits 300 level from BIO/CHM/JBC/JCP/PHY and 1.0 credit from BIO215H5, 314H5, CHM371H5, 391H5,
393H5, PHY324H5. The course is normally taken in the student’s fourth year. In order to enroll in this course,
students must obtain approval from a faculty member(s) who will serve as the supervisor(s) several months in
advance of the start of the course.
Rationale:
This is a new course offering to provide students with interdisciplinary research experience spanning the biological
and physical sciences, as well as providing preparation for careers in science. The course will emphasize project
management, communication, and teamwork skills, areas not stressed as extensively in existing fourth year
research courses in CPS and Biology. The course will also provide an opportunity for the training of students
[graduate students and undergraduates studying in the Concurrent Teacher Education Program (CTEP)] interested
in multidisciplinary research and teaching, who may become involved in both developing and offering the course.
Faculty from the Chemical and Physical Sciences and Biology departments will be involved in offering the course,
as part of their teaching duties.
No. Hours
Instruction:
240P
Offered at St
George:
No
Revived Course:
No
Evaluation: As these are team-based projects, identical grades will be awarded to all members of a given team. This is a balloted
course.
Course #11 PSY3XXH5 Interpersonal Relationships (SCI)
Description:
The objective of this course is to review what relationship science can tell us about close relationships, with a
particular focus on romantic relationships. We will explore questions such as: Why do we want to be in
relationships, what informs our choice of relationship partners, what predicts satisfaction and stability in
relationships, and what is the role of sexuality in relationships? These and other questions will be examined from a
variety of theoretical perspectives and will be applied to better understand real-world relationship functioning.
General topics include theory and methods of relationships, attraction, social cognition, interdependence,
attachment, sexuality, culture and gender, jealousy, and thriving relationships. [36L]
Exclusion:
PSY324H1, 424H1
Prerequisite:
PSY201H5/equivalent, 220H5/230H5
Rationale:
The Department of Psychology at UTM currently offers very few content courses for students with a sustained
interest in Social Psychology. Social Psychology is frequently cited by students as one of the most interesting
areas of the discipline because of its far-reaching implications for real-life social situations. This 300-level course
will provide students with an in-depth focus on attraction, relationships, and interpersonal processes, and will
ultimately provide a bridge between the 200-level lecture course on Introduction to Social Psychology (PSY220)
and 400-level seminars in this area (e.g., Special Topics in Social Psychology, PSY420). Growing student interest
in close relationships is a natural consequence of the expansion of the Adjustment & Well-Being cluster as well as
with the appointment of Prof. Emily Impett as a new faculty member in the department.
No. Hours
Instruction:
36L
Offered at St
George:
Yes
Revived Course:
No
New Courses
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Courses - Resource Implications
Course #1 ANT101H5 Introduction to Biological Anthropology and Archaeology
Resource implications: Same resources as in past years--TA support.
Course #2 ANT200H5 Prehistoric Archaeology
Resource implications: Same resources as in past years--TA support.
Course #3 ANT201H5 World Prehistory
Resource implications: Teaching Assistant support.
Course #4 ANT203Y5 Biological Anthropology
Resource implications: Same resources as in past years--TA support.
Course #5 ANT205H5 Introduction to Forensic Anthropology
Resource implications: Same resources as in past years--TA support.
Course #6 ANT210H5 Fantasies, Hoaxes and Mispresentations of the Ancient World
Resource implications: Teaching Assistant support.
Course #7 ANT308H5 Case Studies in Archaeological Botany and Zoology
Resource implications: None at the moment. However, TA support maybe required dependent on enrolment numbers.
Course #8 ANT309H5 Southeast Asian Archaeology
Resource implications: None at the moment. However, TA support maybe required dependent on enrolment numbers.
Course #9 ANT312H5 Archaeological Analysis
Resource implications: Same resources as in past years--TA support.
Course #10 ANT313H5 China, Korea and Japan in Prehistory
Resource implications: None at the moment. However, TA support maybe required dependent on enrolment numbers.
Course #11 ANT314H5 Archaeological Theory
Resource implications: None at the moment. However, TA support maybe required dependent on enrolment numbers.
Course #12 ANT317H5 Archaeology of Eastern North America
Resource implications: None at the moment. However, TA support maybe required dependent on enrolment numbers.
Course #13 ANT318H5 Archaeological Fieldwork
Resource implications: Same resources as in past years--TA years.
Course #14 ANT320H5 Archaeological Approaches to Technology
Resource implications: None at the moment. However, TA support maybe required dependent on enrolment numbers.
Courses - Resource Implications
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Course #15 ANT327H5 Agricultural Origins: The Second Revolution
Resource implications: TA support maybe required dependent on enrolment numbers.
Course #16 ANT407H5 Statistics and Archaeological Analyses to Quantitative Methods in Biological
Anthropology and Archaeology
Resource implications: Teaching Assistant support.
Course #17 ANT414H5 People and Plants in Prehistory
Resource implications: Same resources as in past years--TA support.
Course #18 ANT415H5 Faunal Archaeo-Osteology
Resource implications: Same resources as in past years--TA support.
Course #19 BIO207H5 Introductory Genetics
Resource implications: None.
Course #20 BIO312H5 Plant Physiology
Resource implications: Appropriate lab space for two lab sections of 24 students; equipment to run labs; lab technician; TA support
according to the Departmental standard for a lab course (1.8 hours per student) for the running of the course; also a one-time 70-hour
TA to assist with the development of the new labs.
Course #21 BIO318Y5 Animal Behaviour
Resource implications: None.
Course #22 BIO328H5 Lectures in Animal Behaviour
Resource implications: None.
Course #23 BIO330H5 Plant Ecology
Resource implications: None.
Course #24 BIO356H5 Major Features of Vertebrate Evolution
Resource implications: None.
Course #25 BIO374H5 Biotechnology and Society
Resource implications: None.
Course #26 BIO375H5 Introductory Medical Biotechnology
Resource implications: TA support - calculated as it is for all lecture-only BIO courses, 0.7 hrs per student.
Course #27 BIO400Y5 Biology Internship
Resource implications: None.
Course #28 BIO445H5 Evolutionary Ecology
Resource implications: An appropriate seminar-style room; no TA support.
Courses - Resource Implications
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Course #29 BIO476H5 Molecular Basis of Disease
Resource implications: None.
Course #30 BIO477H5 Molecular Biology of Gene Expression and Cancer
Resource implications: None.
Course #31 BIO481Y5 Biology Research Project
Resource implications: None.
Course #32 CBJ481Y5 Independent Project in Bioinformatics
Resource implications: None.
Course #33 CHM211H5 Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry
Resource implications: There are no resource implications.
Course #34 CHM231H5 Inorganic Chemistry I
Resource implications: There are no Resource implications.
Course #35 CHM242H5 Introductory Organic Chemistry I
Resource implications: There are no resource implications.
Course #36 CHM331H5 Inorganic Chemistry II: Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
Resource implications: There are no resource implications.
Course #37 CHM333H5 Bioinorganic Chemistry
Resource implications: There are no resource implications.
Course #38 CHM444H5 An Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Recognition
Resource implications: There are no resource implications.
Course #39 CSC108H5 Introduction to Computer Programming
Resource implications: None.
Course #40 CSC318H5 The Design of Interactive Computational Media
Resource implications: None
Course #41 CSC321H5 Introduction to Neural Networks and Machine Learning
Resource implications: None
Course #42 CSC322H5 Introduction to Algebraic Cryptography
Resource implications: None
Course #43 CSC338H5 Numerical Methods
Resource implications: None
Courses - Resource Implications
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Course #44 CSC358H5 Principles of Computer Networks
Resource implications: None
Course #45 CSC384H5 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
Resource implications: None
Course #46 ECO227Y5 Quantitative Methods in Economics
Resource implications: Not applicable.
Course #47 ENV400Y5 Environmental Internship
Resource implications: not applicable
Course #48 ENV490H5 Special Topics in Environmental Studies
Resource implications: not applicable
Course #49 ENV491H5 Special Topics in Environmental Studies
Resource implications: not applicable
Course #50 ENV495H5 Restoration Ecology I
Resource implications: not applicable
Course #51 ENV496H5 Restoration Ecology II
Resource implications: not applicable
Course #52 ERS120H5 Planet Earth
Resource implications: There are no resource implications.
Course #53 ERS319H5 Earth Resources
Resource implications: There are no resource implications.
Course #54 FSC300H5 Forensic Identification
Resource implications: N/A
Course #55 FSC406H5 Introduction To 3D Crime Scene Mapping And Reconstruction
Resource implications: • use of computer lab; sessional instructor; TA; 4 laser distance meters ($1600) • software licenses are being
provided for free from the company • it would be ideal to invest in one significant piece of equipment that could be utilized in at least 4 of
the FSC courses in addition to this one (FSC 300H5, 302H5, 306H5, ANT 306H5) with potential use in the other forensic visualization
courses (HSC403H5, 405H5) e.g. hand-held laser scanner for evidence (approximately $16K)
Course #56 FSC481Y5 Internship in Forensic Science
Resource implications: N/A
Course #57 GGR112H5 Physical Geography
Resource implications: not applicable
Courses - Resource Implications
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Course #58 GGR217H5 Fundamentals of Hydrology
Resource implications: not applicable
Course #59 GGR309H5 Wetland Ecosystems
Resource implications: not applicable
Course #60 GGR315H5 Physical Hydrology
Resource implications: not applicable
Course #61 GGR407H5 Ecohydrology
Resource implications: not applicable
Course #62 HSC200H5 Imaging Technologies for Scientific Visual Communication
Resource implications: None.
Course #63 HSC300H5 Written Communication for Health Care
Resource implications: None.
Course #64 HSC301H5 Data and Information Visualization
Resource implications: None.
Course #65 HSC302H5 Biocommunication Visualization
Resource implications: None.
Course #66 HSC401H5 Health and Science Communication Design
Resource implications: None.
Course #67 JCB487Y5 Advanced Interdisciplinary Research Laboratory
Resource implications: There are no resource implications.
Course #68 JCP221H5 Thermodynamics and Kinetics
Resource implications: There are no resource implications.
Course #69 MAT212H5 Modeling with Differential Equations in Life Sciences and Medicine
Resource implications: None
Course #70 MAT232H5 Calculus of Several Variables
Resource implications: None
Course #71 MAT233H5 Calculus of Several Variables
Resource implications: None
Course #72 MAT242H5 Differential Equations I
Courses - Resource Implications
40
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Resource implications: None
Course #73 MAT301H5 Groups and Symmetries
Resource implications: None
Course #74 MAT302H5 Introduction to Algebraic Cryptography
Resource implications: None
Course #75 MAT309H5 Introduction to Mathematical Logic
Resource implications: None
Course #76 MAT311H5 Partial Differential Equations
Resource implications: None
Course #77 MAT315H5 Introduction to Number Theory
Resource implications: None
Course #78 MAT332H5 Introduction to Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos
Resource implications: None
Course #79 MAT334H5 Complex Variables
Resource implications: None
Course #80 MAT344H5 Introduction to Combinatorics
Resource implications: None
Course #81 MAT368H5 Vector Calculus
Resource implications: None
Course #82 MAT378H5 Introduction to Analysis
Resource implications: None
Course #83 MAT382H5 Mathematics for Teachers
Resource implications: None
Course #84 MAT388H5 Topics in Mathematics
Resource implications: None
Course #85 MAT392H5 Ideas of Mathematics
Resource implications: None
Course #86 MAT401H5 Polynomial Equations and Fields
Resource implications: None
Course #87 MAT402H5 Classical Geometries
Courses - Resource Implications
41
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Resource implications: None
Course #88 MAT405H5 Introduction to Topology
Resource implications: None
Course #89 MAT406H5 Mathematical Introduction to Game Theory
Resource implications: None
Course #90 MAT478H5 Topics in Mathematics
Resource implications: None
Course #91 MAT488H5 Topics in Mathematics
Resource implications: None
Course #92 MAT492H5 Senior Thesis
Resource implications: None
Course #93 MAT498H5 Topics in Mathematics
Resource implications: None
Course #94 PHY237H5 The Physics of the Climate System
Resource implications: Not offered in 2012-13.
Course #95 PHY241H5 Electromagnetism
Resource implications: We will require an additional 12 TA hours. Suitable laboratory rooms (DV2055 and DV2062) have been
identified, and they are known to have the capacity to accommodate the additional hours. Equipment requirements will be minimal, and
will involve either existing equipment or items to be covered from the departmental budget. The nature of the experiments in this course
will be such that no consumables (chemicals, etc.) will be required, so there are no resources required for these.
Course #96 PHY325H5 Mathematical Physics
Resource implications: There are no resource implications.
Course #97 PHY347H5 Optics
Resource implications: There are no resource implications.
Course #98 PHY451H5 Classical Electrodynamics
Resource implications: There are no resource implications.
Course #99 PSY220H5 Introduction to Social Psychology
Resource implications: None
Course #100 PSY316H5 Infant Perception and Cognition
Resource implications: None
Course #101 PSY343H5 Theories of Psychotherapy
Resource implications: None
Courses - Resource Implications
42
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Course #102 PSY353H5 Developmental Social Neuroscience
Resource implications: None
Course #103 PSY3XXH5 Interpersonal Relationships
Resource implications: None
Course #104 SOC350H5 Quantitative Analysis I
Resource implications: Not applicable
Course #105 STA107H5 An Introduction to Probability and Modelling
Resource implications: None.
Course #106 STA302H5 Regression Analysis
Resource implications: None.
Course #107 STA305H5 Experimental Design
Resource implications: None.
Course #108 STA431H5 Structural Equation Models
Resource implications: None.
Course #109 STA441H5 Methods of Applied Statistics
Resource implications: None
Courses - Resource Implications
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Deleted Courses
Course #1 BIO442H5 Mechanisms of Evolution
Rationale: Our proposed new course, BIO445H5 will replace this course, which has not been offered since the retirement of David
Gibo in 2009.
Course #2 PSY327H5 Emotion and Cognition
Rationale: This covers a very specific area for which there are few suitable instructors available. It has not been taught for the past
few years and there is no interest in offering it again.
Course #3 SOC351H5 Quantitative Analysis II
Rationale: This course has not been required for Sociology Specialists since 2006. It is not central to any program, and is unlikely to
be offered in the forseeable future.
Deleted Courses
44
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Renumbered Courses
Course #1 ANT407H5 Statistics and Archaeological Analyses to Quantitative Methods in Biological
Anthropology and Archaeology
Before:
After:
ANT307H5
ANT407H5
Rationale: Because the data used for instruction on statistical methods are drawn directly from the discipline, an understanding of the
practice of biological anthropology and archaeology is critical. Preparation in requisite coursework is necessary for
grasping fundamental statistical concepts. Given that currently enrolled students are majors, this course seems like a
logical follow-up for students interested in pursuing more specialized topics. As such, the course should be offered at the
fourth-year level.
Course #2 STA302H5 Regression Analysis
Before:
After:
STA331H5
STA302H5
Rationale: STA331H5 is equivalent to STA302H1. Doesn’t need to propagate itself in prerequisite/exclusion lists since it was
previously STA302H5 (we followed StG through numbering changes).
Course #3 STA305H5 Experimental Design
Before:
After:
STA332H5
STA305H5
Rationale: STA332H5 is equivalent to STA305H1.
Course #4 STA441H5 Methods of Applied Statistics
Before:
After:
STA442H5
STA441H5
Rationale: StG has a STA442H1 and it is not the same as STA442H5; STA442H1 is cross listed as STA2101H1 - a UTM graduate
who began her MSc at StG was almost excluded from the grad course since she’d completed STA442H5; the number 441
is not used for a stats course at any UofT campus.
Renumbered Courses
45
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Reweighted Courses
Course #1 ANT200H5 Prehistoric Archaeology
Before:
After:
ANT200Y5
ANT200H5
Rationale: Y course divided into 2 half courses. ANT200Y5 to be changed to ANT200H5, with new title and description. Change from
tutorials to practicals: Due to lack of sufficient lab space, first and second year courses in biological anthropology and
archaeology have not been able to conduct proper lab practicals. However, wit the new teaching labs planned for next
year, and the shift of research materials to the new HSC building, the opening of space in North has allowed us to make
this change already in the way the courses are taught, starting 2011 or in some with 2010.
Y course divided into 2 half courses. ANT200Y5 to be changed to ANT200H5, with new title and description. The second
half has been introduced as a new course ANT201H5.
Reweighted Courses
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Courses - Description Changes
Course #1 ANT101H5 Introduction to Biological Anthropology and Archaeology
Before:
Anthropology is the global and holistic study of human biology and behaviour, and includes four subfields: biological
anthropology, archaeology, sociocultural anthropology and linguistics. The material covered is directed to answering the
After:
Anthropology is the global and holistic study of human biology and behaviour, and includes four subfields: biological
anthropology, archaeology, sociocultural anthropology and linguistics. The material covered is directed to answering the
question: What makes us human? This course is a survey of biological anthropology and archaeology. [24L,
question: What makes us human? This course is a survey of biological anthropology and archaeology. [24L,
12T]
12P]
Rationale: Change from tutorials to practicals: Due to lack of sufficient lab space, first and second year courses in biological
anthropology and archaeology have not been able to conduct proper lab practicals. However, with the new teaching labs
planned for next year, and the shift of research materials to the new HSC building, the opening of space in North has
allowed us to make this change already in the way the courses are taught, starting 2011 or in some with 2010.
Course #2 ANT200H5 Prehistoric Archaeology
Before:
After:
theory, and world prehistory. Principles of scientific research will be applied
to archaeological information, from the Early Pleistocene to the beginning of written
history. [48L, 24T]
Archaeological theory, method and technique. Principles of scientific research will be applied to archaeological
information. The course will cover the following topics: how archaeology
applies the scientific method; how archaeological projects are planned and
organized; how archaeological data are recovered through survey,
excavation and other means; how archaeological data are organized and
analyzed to produce information about the human past; the major theoretical
paradigms that archaeologists use to interpret the human past. [24L, 12P]
Archaeological method and
Rationale: Y course divided into 2 half courses. ANT200Y5 to be changed to ANT200H5, with new title and description. Change from
tutorials to practicals: Due to lack of sufficient lab space, first and second year courses in biological anthropology and
archaeology have not been able to conduct proper lab practicals. However, wit the new teaching labs planned for next
year, and the shift of research materials to the new HSC building, the opening of space in North has allowed us to make
this change already in the way the courses are taught, starting 2011 or in some with 2010.
To better reflect the course content of a Y course divided into 2 half courses.
Course #3 ANT203Y5 Biological Anthropology
Before:
A survey of the field of biological anthropology. Topics will include human evolution and palaeontology, skeletal biology,
human genetics and variation, human growth, primatology and human adaptation. [48L,
After:
24T]
A survey of the field of biological anthropology. Topics will include human evolution and palaeontology, skeletal biology,
human genetics and variation, human growth, primatology and human adaptation. [48L,
24P]
Rationale: Change from tutorials to practicals: Due to lack of sufficient lab space, first and second year courses in biological
anthropology and archaeology have not been able to conduct proper lab practicals. However, with the new teaching labs
planned for next year, and the shift of research materials to the new HSC building, the opening of space in North has
allowed us to make this change already in the way the courses are taught, starting 2011 or in some with 2010.
Course #4 ANT205H5 Introduction to Forensic Anthropology
Before:
Introduction to the field of forensic anthropology. Outlines the areas in which forensic anthropologists may contribute to a
After:
Introduction to the field of forensic anthropology. Outlines the areas in which forensic anthropologists may contribute to a
death investigation and introduces basic concepts relating to the recovery and analysis of human remains. [24L,
death investigation and introduces basic concepts relating to the recovery and analysis of human remains. [24L,
12T]
12P]
Rationale: Change from tutorials to practicals: Due to lack of sufficient lab space, first and second year courses in biological
anthropology and archaeology have not been able to conduct proper lab practicals. However, with the new teaching labs
planned for next year, and the shift of research materials to the new HSC building, the opening of space in North has
allowed us to make this change already in the way the courses are taught, starting 2011 or in some with 2010.
Courses - Description Changes
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Course #5 ANT407H5 Statistics and Archaeological Analyses to Quantitative Methods in Biological
Anthropology and Archaeology
Before:
The fragmentary nature of archaeological data sets presents many challenges for investigators. Is there
meaningful pattern to be found? How do we transform a description of the data set into an interpretation about the society
we are studying? This course provides students with an introduction to general statistical principles used by social
scientists and the different methods suitable for archaeological exploration. Students will learn how to apply statistical
procedures using Minitab software to case studies. Each class will include a lab component.
After:
[24L, 12T]
The fragmentary nature of data recovered from prehistoric sites sets presents many challenges for
investigators. Is there meaningful pattern to be found? How do we transform a description of the data set into an
interpretation about the society we are studying? This course provides students with an introduction to general statistical
principles used by social scientists and the different methods suitable for archaeological exploration. Students will learn
how to apply statistical procedures using Minitab software to case studies. Each class will include a lab component.
Rationale: Course description presently limited to statistical instruction and should emphasize the research design component of the
course. The course is intended to help students' gain a first-hand experience with the scientific method and inductive
reasoning.
Course #6 BIO312H5 Plant Physiology
Before:
This course will focus on the principal physiological processes in plants and their response to environmental factors and
global change. By addressing factors involved in global change, including rising atmospheric CO2, alterations of the global
nitrogen cycle and global climate warming, and examining their effects on photosynthesis and plant metabolism, the course
will provide the basis to understand the implications of global change factors to plants, ecosystems and their impact on
carbon sources and sinks in the modern biosphere.
After:
[36L]
This course will focus on the principal physiological processes in plants and their response to environmental factors and
global change. By addressing factors involved in global change, including rising atmospheric CO2, alterations of the global
nitrogen cycle and global climate warming, and examining their effects on photosynthesis and plant metabolism, the course
will provide the basis to understand the implications of global change factors to plants, ecosystems and their impact on
carbon sources and sinks in the modern biosphere.
[36L, 15P]
Rationale: This course will provide the setting for the Department to develop the plant physiology stream more fully, which we have
not had the chance to expand in recent years due to staffing issues. The addition of five 3-hour labs in this course will act
as a compliment to our senior animal physiology lab course (BIO409H5). The two plant labs that are currently in BIO409H
will be moved to BIO312H and three new ones developed for the course. The Department's hope and plan is to grow this
course to eight 3-hour labs in future years.
Course #7 BIO318Y5 Animal Behaviour
Before:
After:
An introductory overview of the behaviour of animals presented from a
zoological perspective for Biology specialists. Behaviour is examined as
the evolved result of interaction with other animals, such as predators,
potential mates and other aspects of the environment. Other topics include
behavioural genetics, development, communication, motivation and the
control of behaviour by physiological mechanisms. Students are required to
complete an independent project. [48L, 72P]
This course will cover the adaptive (evolved) behaviours of organisms that
result from interactions with the biological environment. We ask why animals behave
in a particular way, i.e. how does their behaviour enhance success in
survival or reproduction? Examples involve adaptive strategies in
competing with rivals, choosing mates, and avoiding parasites. We also ask
how adaptive behaviour is controlled; what are the genetic, developmental, and
physiological mechanisms underlying behaviour? Assignments involve
observing and analyzing (suggesting alternative explanations/ hypotheses)
for behaviour, followed by a use of these skills to critique a published
scientific paper. [48L, 72P]
Courses - Description Changes
48
Sciences
Rationale: The new course description more accurately reflects the course content.
Course #8 BIO328H5 Lectures in Animal Behaviour
Before:
After:
An introductory overview of the behaviour of animals presented from a
zoological perspective for Biology specialists. Behaviour is examined as
the evolved result of interaction with other animals, such as predators or
potential mates, and other aspects of the environment. Other topics include
behavioural genetics, development, communication, motivation and the
control of behaviour by physiological mechanisms. No laboratory or field work is included. [48L]
This course will cover the adaptive (evolved) behaviours of organisms that
result from interactions with the biological environment. We ask why animals
behave in a particular way, i.e. how does their behaviour enhance success
in survival or reproduction? Examples involve adaptive strategies in
competing with rivals, choosing mates, and avoiding parasites. We also ask
how adaptive behaviour is controlled; what are the genetic, developmental,
and physiological mechanisms underlying behaviour? Assignments involve
observing and analyzing (suggesting alternative explanations/ hypotheses)
for behaviour, followed by a use of these skills to critique a published
scientific paper. No laboratory or field work is included. [48L]
Rationale: The change in course description more accurately reflects course content.
Course #9 BIO356H5 Major Features of Vertebrate Evolution
Before:
The evolution of the vertebrates as evidenced by the fossil record. The origin and adaptive radiation of major groups
Practical sessions include the study of
fossils, and techniques of collection and preparation. Six laboratory sessions
are held at the Royal Ontario Museum. [24L, 36P]
including amphibians and reptiles is emphasized.
After:
The evolution of the vertebrates as evidenced by the fossil record. The origin and adaptive radiation of major groups
Principles and knowledge will be
demonstrated through written assignments and essays. [36L]
including amphibians and reptiles is emphasized.
Rationale: Change in course description reflects changes currently being made to the course. Practicals will be removed from this
course. With increasing enrollment, removing the practicals will allow us to offer this course to more than 96 students each
year. To maintain the academic standard for a 300-level course (now that there are no labs), an increase in the lecture
hours (from 24 to 36 hours) will be made. This will allow for the development of writing assignments and essays as well as
an in-depth the exploration of phylogenetic principles/ methodologies.
Course #10 BIO374H5 Biotechnology and Society
Before:
This course provides an overview of methods and applications of biotechnology and their relevance to society. The course
covers the gambit of biotechnology applications and delves into the pros and cons of each technology and the perceived
include: Bioethics, Gene Therapy, Plant
Biotechnology, Marine Biotechnology, Bioinformatics and the Pharmaceutical
Industry, Vaccine Development, Animal Biotechnology, Intellectual Property
and Career Choices, Risk Perception of Biotechnology, Biotechnology and
the Developing World, Environmental Impact of Biotechnology, Gene
Screening and Pharmacogenomics, Stem Cell Biology, Microbial
Biotechnology. [36L]
risks to society in each case. Topics may
After:
This course provides an overview of methods and applications of biotechnology and their relevance to society. The course
covers the gambit of biotechnology applications and delves into the pros and cons of each technology and the perceived
risks to society in each case. Topics may
Courses - Description Changes
include microbial biotechnology, plant
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biotechnology, animal biotechnology, forensic biotechnology, environmental
biotechnology, aquatic biotechnology and medical biotechnology. It may also
discuss the application of bioinformatics/genomics in biotechnology. [36L]
Rationale: Change in course description addresses content changes to the course that are to take place for 2012-2013.
Course #11 BIO400Y5 Biology Internship
Before:
Through a part-time, unpaid, 200-hour work placement, fourth year students apply biology content and skills. Placements
are made throughout the GTA in both the private (e.g. pharmaceutical or biotech companies) or public (e.g. Peel Region
Medical Office, hospitals, Great Lakes Laboratory) sector. Monthly class meetings plus year-end report and presentation
are required. Students in a biology specialist program are given priority. Updated application information will be on-line at
www.utm.utoronto.ca/intern by February 1st of each year. Please see the Internship Office (DV
information.
After:
3004) for more
Through a part-time, unpaid, 200-hour work placement, fourth year students apply biology content and skills. Placements
are made throughout the GTA in both the private (e.g. pharmaceutical or biotech companies) or public (e.g. Peel Region
Medical Office, hospitals, Great Lakes Laboratory) sector. Monthly class meetings plus year-end report and presentation
are required. Students in a biology specialist program are given priority. Updated application information will be on-line at
www.utm.utoronto.ca/intern by February 1st of each year. Please see the Internship Office (DV
information.
3201D) for more
Rationale:
Course #12 BIO477H5 Molecular Biology of Gene Expression and Cancer
Before:
The first part of the course examines how genes are regulated in eukaryotic cells. It also explores the field of functional
genomics and in particular examines how gene expression can be
monitored on a genome-wide basis using DNA
microarrays. The second part of the course examines the molecular and genetic basis of cancer including the role
of oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and cell cycle regulating proteins in the development of this disease. Lectures and
seminars involve presentation and discussion of recently published research articles. [36L, 12S]
After:
The first part of the course examines how genes are regulated in eukaryotic cells. It also explores the field of functional
genomics and in particular examines how gene expression
and genomes can be studied on a genome-wide
basis using DNA microarrays and high throughput sequencing. The second part of the course
examines the molecular and genetic basis of cancer including the role of oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and cell
It also looks at cancer from a
functional genomics perspective. Lectures and seminars involve presentation and discussion of
cycle regulating proteins in the development of this disease.
recently published research articles. [36L, 12S]
Rationale: The minor changes to the course description reflects some of the changes in course content over the past few years.
Course #13 CHM444H5 An Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Recognition
Before:
An introduction to drug discovery, design and development. This course will focus on the potential of proteins (enzymes,
receptors, receptor structure and signal transduction) as targets for molecular therapeutic intervention. The strategies of
finding a drug target, optimizing target interactions and synthetic molecular therapeutic development will all be considered
and discussed. The modern technologies of targeting protein-protein interactions will also be covered.
After:
[24L, 12T]
An introduction to drug discovery, design and development. This course will focus on the potential of proteins (enzymes,
receptors, receptor structure and signal transduction) as targets for molecular therapeutic intervention. The strategies of
finding a drug target, optimizing target interactions and synthetic molecular therapeutic development will all be considered
and discussed. The modern technologies of targeting protein-protein interactions will also be covered.
[24L]
Rationale: To be reduced from 24L, 12T to just 24L (no tutorials). To be taught as a single two-hour lecture per week. Rationale:
Instructor feels that a single two-hour block per week is both more convenient for students and fully sufficient to cover the
material, and departmental administration agrees.
Course #14 CSC318H5 The Design of Interactive Computational Media
Before:
User-centred design of interactive systems; methodologies, principles and
metaphors; task analysis. Interdisciplinary design; the role of graphic design, industrial design and
the behavioural sciences. Interactive hardware and software; concepts from computer graphics. Typography,
Courses - Description Changes
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After:
layout, colour, sound, video, gesture and usability enhancements. Classes of
interactive graphical media; direct manipulation systems, extensible systems, rapid proto-typing
tools. Students work on projects in interdisciplinary teams. Enrolment limited, but non-computer scientists welcome.
[24L, 12T]
User-centered design of interactive systems. Methodologies, principles, metaphors,
task analysis, and other topics. Interdisciplinary design; the role of industrial design and the behavioural
sciences. Interactive hardware and software; concepts from computer graphics. Classes of direct manipulation systems,
prototyping tools. Additional topics in interactive
computational media. Students work on projects in interdisciplinary teams. Enrolment limited, but
non-computer scientists welcome.[24L, 12T]
extensible systems, rapid
Rationale: The current course instructor has indicated that the content has been developed and refined at StG since the course was
first offered. This description is currently in use on the other campuses.
Course #15 CSC321H5 Introduction to Neural Networks and Machine Learning
Before:
After:
Supervised neural networks: the perceptron learning procedure, the backpropagation learning
procedure and its applications. Elaborations of backpropagation: activation
and error functions, improving speed and generalization, Bayesian
approaches. Associative memories and optimization: Gibbs sampling, mean
field search. Representation in neural networks: distributed representations,
effects of damage, hierarchical representations. Unsupervised neural
networks: competitive learning, Boltzmann machines, sigmoid belief nets. [24L, 12T]
The first half of the course is about supervised learning for regression and
classification problems and will include the perceptron learning procedure,
backpropagation, and methods for ensuring good generalisation to new
data. The second half of the course is about unsupervised learning methods
that discover hidden causes and will include Kmeans, the EM algorithm,
Boltzmann machines, and deep belief nets. [24L, 12T]
Rationale: The current course instructor has indicated that the content has been developed and refined at StG since the course was
first offered. This description is currently in use on the other campuses.
Course #16 CSC338H5 Numerical Methods
Before:
After:
The study of numerical methods for solving problems in linear algebra, non-linear equations,
approximation, integration and ordinary differential equations. The aim is to give students a
basic understanding of both floating-point arithmetic and the methods used to solve numerical
problems as well as a familiarity with the types of subroutines found in typical software
packages. [24L, 12T]
Computational methods for solving numerical problems in science, engineering and
business. Linear and non-linear equations, approximation, optimization,
interpolation,integration and differentiation. The aim is to give students a basic understanding of
floating-point arithmetic and the implementation of algorithms used to solve
numericalproblems, as well as a familiarity with current numerical computing
environments.Course concepts are crucial to a wide range of practical
applications such as computational finance and portfolio management,
graphics and special effects, data mining and machine learning, as well as
robotics, bioinformatics, medical imaging and others.[24L, 12T]
Rationale: The regular course instructor, Anthony Bonner, has modified the description to be less abstract and more meaningful to
computer science students.
Courses - Description Changes
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Course #17 CSC358H5 Principles of Computer Networks
Before:
Introduction to computer networks and systems programming of networks. Basic understanding of computer networks and
network protocols. Network hardware and software, routing, addressing, congestion control, reliable data transfer, and
socket programming.
After:
Introduction to computer networks and systems programming of networks. Basic understanding of computer networks and
network protocols. Network hardware and software, routing, addressing, congestion control, reliable data transfer, and
socket programming.
[24L,12P]
Rationale: Contact hours are missing.
Course #18 CSC384H5 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
Before:
A broad introduction to the sub-disciplines of AI. Core topics: search methods, game playing and rule-based systems.
Overview of: natural language understanding, knowledge representation, reasoning, planning, vision, robotics, learning and
LISP or
neural networks. Assignments provide practical experience, both theory and programming, of the core topics.
Prolog programming is required for at least one assignment. [24L, 12T]
After:
A broad introduction to the sub-disciplines of AI. Core topics: search methods, game playing and rule-based systems.
Overview of: natural language understanding, knowledge representation, reasoning, planning, vision, robotics, learning and
neural networks. Assignments provide practical experience, both theory and programming, of the core topics. [24L, 12T]
Rationale: The assignments could be implemented in a number of languages that the students know. Restricting the instructor to a
single language has no tangible benefit.
Course #19 ENV400Y5 Environmental Internship
Before:
Through a part-time, unpaid work placement, students apply the environmental expertise gained through previous course
work. Placements are made at local conservation authorities, municipal planning departments,
environmental consulting companies, corporations, federal agencies, and other organizations. You must see the Internship
Support Officer, Jennifer Storer-Folt ([email protected]) before June 1 to apply for the course.
Specialists in an Environment Program will be given priority for admission. It is difficult to place students with CGPA of less
than 2.5. If you are in this position and this is a required course for your program, please see a Program Advisor or the
Academic Counsellor for an alternative course placement.
After:
Through a part-time, unpaid work placement, students apply the environmental expertise gained through previous course
work. Placements are made at local conservation authorities, municipalities, environmental consulting companies,
corporations, federal agencies, and other organizations. You must see the Internship Support Officer, Jennifer Storer-Folt
([email protected]) to submit your application by March 1 to apply for the course.
Specialists in an Environment Program will be given priority for admission. It is difficult to place students with CGPA of less
than 2.5. If you are in this position and this is a required course for your program, please see a Program Advisor or the
Academic Counsellor for an alternative course placement.
Rationale: To be more in line with the NEW registration dates.
Course #20 ENV490H5 Special Topics in Environmental Studies
Before:
These courses highlight various topics of special interest in environmental studies. The specific focus and format of the
course will vary, depending on the chosen topic. The course will not be offered every year. Please check with the
Academic Counsellor,
After:
Grace Chung (905-828-5465), for further information. [24L]
These courses highlight various topics of special interest in environmental studies. The specific focus and format of the
course will vary, depending on the chosen topic. The course will not be offered every year. Please check with the
Academic Counsellor,
Sabrina Ferrari (905-828-5465), for further information. [24L]
Rationale: Update Academic Counsellor
Course #21 ENV491H5 Special Topics in Environmental Studies
Before:
These courses highlight various topics of special interest in environmental studies. The specific focus and format of the
courses will vary, depending on the chosen topic. The courses will not be offered every year. Please check with the
Academic Counsellor,
Grace Chung (905-828-5465), for further information. [24L]
After:
Courses - Description Changes
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These courses highlight various topics of special interest in environmental studies. The specific focus and format of the
courses will vary, depending on the chosen topic. The courses will not be offered every year. Please check with the
Academic Counsellor,
Sabrina Ferrari (905-828-5465), for further information. [24L]
Rationale: Update Academic Counsellor
Course #22 ERS120H5 Planet Earth
Before:
We discuss the age and origin of the Earth, the nature of its deep interior, the origin of mountains, oceans, earthquakes
and volcanoes, and show how these features are related in a unifying theory known as Plate Tectonics, that explains how
the evolution of the Earth's surface is driven by internal processes. Tutorials will include laboratory exercises devoted to
the understanding and recoginition of minerals, rocks and geological structures. [24L,
After:
12T]
We discuss the age and origin of the Earth, the nature of its deep interior, the origin of mountains, oceans, earthquakes
and volcanoes, and show how these features are related in a unifying theory known as Plate Tectonics, that explains how
the evolution of the Earth's surface is driven by internal processes. Tutorials will include laboratory exercises devoted to
the understanding and recoginition of minerals, rocks and geological structures. [24L,
12P]
Rationale: Change the course hours from [24L, 12T] to [24L, 12P], to reflect the fact that the tutorial hours are being used for lab
work.
Course #23 ERS319H5 Earth Resources
Before:
The formation and global distribution of precious and industrial mineral deposits are introduced. Exploration methods and
mining practices are discussed in terms of environmental effects and issues. Basic aspects of the economics and strategic
importance of mineral reserves are also covered. Weekly field trips are included. [24L,
After:
36P]
The formation and global distribution of precious and industrial mineral deposits are introduced. Exploration methods and
mining practices are discussed in terms of environmental effects and issues. Basic aspects of the economics and strategic
importance of mineral reserves are also covered. Weekly field trips are included. [24L,
48P]
Rationale: Change course hours from [24L, 36P] to [24L, 48P] The extra hours reflect field-work already being done; this is
instructor-led and outdoors, so it does not increase TA hours or staff hours, and does not require any room booking.
Course #24 FSC300H5 Forensic Identification
Before:
Focusing on the scene of the crime and evidence found there, this course is an introduction to the field of forensic
identification. Topics include: crime scene protocols, management and reconstruction; image collection, storage and
enhancement; recognition collection; and chain of custody and preservation of evidence. [24L, 24P]
After:
Focusing on the scene of the crime and evidence found there, this course is an introduction to the field of forensic
identification. Topics include: crime scene protocols, management and reconstruction; image collection, storage and
enhancement; recognition collection; and chain of custody and preservation of evidence. [24L, 24P]
Rationale:
Course #25 FSC481Y5 Internship in Forensic Science
Before:
Notes:
- Students MUST contact Ms. Jennifer Storer-Folt in the Internship Support Office (Room 3004, William G. Davis Bldg.,
905-828-5295, [email protected]) by the November preceding the placement.
- Students must have one free day (Monday - Friday) to work in a placement position, and must be in the final year before
graduation. Students are expected to provide their own transportation to placement work site.
- Five week placements during the summer may be possible.
After:
Notes:
- Students MUST contact Ms. Jennifer Storer-Folt in the Internship Support Office (Room 3201D, William G. Davis
Bldg., 905-828-5295, [email protected]) by the November preceding the placement.
- Students must have one free day (Monday - Friday) to work in a placement position, and must be in the final year before
graduation. Students are expected to provide their own transportation to placement work site.
- Five week placements during the summer may be possible.
Rationale:
Course #26 GGR217H5 Fundamentals of Hydrology
Before:
Courses - Description Changes
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continents, atmosphere and oceans, sustains the Earth's
climate, biosphere and life itself. This course takes a systems approach to the movement and
storage of water on and in the Earth. Based on the framework of the global water cycle, the stores and transfers
of water and energy in the Earth system are investigated from a scientific perspective.
Emphases are on the physical processes that control these transfers (e.g. short
and longwave energy balances, evaporation, surface and subsurface flow of
water). [24L, 12P]
Hydrology is the study of the quantity, quality, storage, and transfer of the
world’s freshwater. The presence of water on and in the continents and atmosphere sustains
the terrestrial biosphere, including human life. This course focuses on the
central concepts of hydrology by taking a systems approach to the movement and storage of
water on and in a watershed. Based on the framework of the water cycle, the course emphasizes
the physical processes that control the stores and transfers of water and energy in the Earth
system. This course serves as a gateway to the more advanced treatment of
hydrology in upper levels, as well as providing a solid understanding of
the fundamentals of the science of water for students in other streams of
physical geography, environmental science, earth science, and biology. [24L, 12P]
The presence of water on and in the
After:
Rationale: The change in course title and description reflects the change in faculty appointment to this course and the hydrology
stream in the Department of Geography. It also better illustrates that this is an introductory course in hydrology meant to be
taking in sequence with upper level hydrology-stream courses, as well as for other science majors to develop an
appreciation of the hydrosphere.
Course #27 GGR309H5 Wetland Ecosystems
Before:
This course is offered in even-numbered years, alternating with GGR315H5.
After:
Rationale: The change in course title and minor change to the course description better reflects the content of the course. The
management and preservation topics are not addressed in great enough depth to warrant inclusion in the title. This is a
science course exploring wetland ecosystems; this is what the course should be called. The addition of 24 practical hours
(from 12 to 36) reflects the need for students to become engaged with wetlands beyond the lectures. Students will make
several trips to local wetlands and participate in laboratories, increasing their knowledge breadth. This course has been
operated for several years in succession, with increasing enrollments. It no longer needs to be alternated between years.
Course #28 GGR309H5 Wetland Ecosystems
Before:
Wetlands are an integral part of our biosphere, playing fundamental roles in the modification of water quality,
biodiversity and the global carbon cycle. This course focuses on the definition, classification,
hydrology and biogeochemistry of wetland systems. The latter part of the course builds on this physical
foundation by introducing management issues associated with wetland preservation, restoration and creation. [24L,
12P]
After:
Wetlands are an integral part of our biosphere, playing fundamental roles in the modification of water quality,
biodiversity, and the global carbon cycle. This course focuses on the classification, hydrology,
biogeochemistry, and ecology of wetland systems. The latter part of the course builds on this physical
foundation by introducing management issues associated with wetland preservation, restoration and creation. [24L,
36P] test3
Rationale: The change in course title and minor change to the course description better reflects the content of the course. The
management and preservation topics are not addressed in great enough depth to warrant inclusion in the title. This is a
science course exploring wetland ecosystems; this is what the course should be called. The addition of 24 practical hours
(from 12 to 36) reflects the need for students to become engaged with wetlands beyond the lectures. Students will make
several trips to local wetlands and participate in laboratories, increasing their knowledge breadth. This course has been
operated for several years in succession, with increasing enrollments. It no longer needs to be alternated between years.
Course #29 GGR315H5 Physical Hydrology
Courses - Description Changes
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Before:
This course is offered in odd-number years, alternating with GGR309H5.
After:
Rationale: The minor change to the course description reflects the advanced nature of the subject matter.
The addition of 24 practical hours (from 12 to 36) reflects the need for students to become engaged with field and lab
research in hydrology. Students will conduct weekly assignments outdoors and in the lab setting, in addition to a term-long
field monitoring project all of which will significantly increasing their connection to the subject matter.
The removal of GGR227H5 from the list of prerequisites is necessary to ensure students have the required prior
knowledge for the course. Either 214 or 217 provides the background.
This course has been operated for several years in succession, with increasing enrollments. It no longer needs to be
alternated between years. Course #30 GGR315H5 Physical Hydrology
Before:
This course centres on the physical principles involved in the occurrence and movement of water on and beneath the
Earth's surface. Watershed-scale hydrologic systems are investigated, along with basic principles of fluid mechanics. Open
channel hydraulics, soil water and groundwater processes are investigated. The importance of understanding water
movement in the environment by exploring the relationship of hydrology to other environmental sciences is stressed. [24L,
12P]
After:
This course centres on the advanced treatment of the physical principles involved in the occurrence and
movement of water on and beneath the Earth's surface. Watershed-scale hydrologic systems are investigated, along with
basic principles of fluid mechanics. Open channel hydraulics, soil water, and groundwater processes are investigated.
The importance of understanding water movement in the environment by exploring the relationship of hydrology to other
environmental sciences is stressed. [24L,
36P]
Rationale: The minor change to the course description reflects the advanced nature of the subject matter.
The addition of 24 practical hours (from 12 to 36) reflects the need for students to become engaged with field and lab
research in hydrology. Students will conduct weekly assignments outdoors and in the lab setting, in addition to a term-long
field monitoring project all of which will significantly increasing their connection to the subject matter.
The removal of GGR227H5 from the list of prerequisites is necessary to ensure students have the required prior
knowledge for the course. Either 214 or 217 provides the background.
This course has been operated for several years in succession, with increasing enrollments. It no longer needs to be
alternated between years. Course #31 GGR407H5 Ecohydrology
Before:
After:
Watershed hydrologic controls on water quality are emphasized. Topics include
hydrologic flowpaths, mixing models, isotopic and geochemical tracers and the
interactions amongst watershed biologic, geologic and hydrologic systems.
Students are expected to conduct independent study. [24L]
Ecohydrology explores the feedbacks between biological, hydrological and
biogeochemical processes that help shape ecosystem form and function.
These feedbacks are central to the regulation of the global climate and
water resources. With pronounced and rapid human modification to the
landscape and climate system this field of study is increasingly relevant to
formulate mitigation strategies. This seminar and research course explores
the feedback processes most crucial to climate change and water
resources. Topics include ecosystem control on the water balance, the role of
peatlands in ameliorating climate change, hydrologic controls on species
diversity, and the role of the watershed in mitigating human pollutants. Students are
expected to conduct independent and collaborative study. [24S, 36P]
Rationale: The change in course description better reflects to students what is meant by ecohydrology. The previous description
referred to watershed water and solute cycling, a different area in the advanced treatment of hydrology. The addition of 36
practical hours will allow students to engage in group and individual research projects (including the collection of data) as
part of the course requirements. The change from 24 lecture hours to 24 seminar hours reflects how the course operates.
The addition of several alternative prerequisites is intended to broaden the pool of students eligible for this course. The
change in content allows for greater exploration of ecological interactions with hydrology. Students without 315, but an
introduction to hydrology (217) and additional ecological and soil science courses would do well.
Courses - Description Changes
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Course #32 HSC401H5 Health and Science Communication Design
Before:
This course presents the principles of health and science communication and examines the characteristics of effective
audience-specific media design. Included are issues of learning context, target audience analysis, and effective information
design in the development of tools that communicate concepts to the general public. Students will analyze existing media,
conduct an information needs assessment, and design
12S, 12P]
After:
a website on a current health or science-related topic. [12L,
This course presents the principles of health and science communication and examines the characteristics of effective
audience-specific media design. Included are issues of learning context, target audience analysis, and effective information
design in the development of tools that communicate concepts to the general public. Students will analyze existing media,
conduct an information needs assessment, and design
or science-related topic. [12L, 12S, 12P]
an *interactive learning tool* on a current health
Rationale: Change in course name and description more accurately reflects the kind of work students do in the course, which now
includes, for examples, the design of apps rather than simply web-based media.
Course #33 MAT233H5 Calculus of Several Variables
Before:
Limited enrolment; preference given to students enrolled in MAT programs.
After:
Limited enrolment; preference given to students enrolled in MAT
or STA programs.
Rationale: This is a “bridging course” that allows students who took Calculus for Commerce, MAT133, to continue to higher level
courses in MAT and STA.
Course #34 MAT242H5 Differential Equations I
Before:
After:
Solution of first order differential equations. Applications. Linear equations,
especially of second order. Systems of linear equations. Nonlinear phenomena,
linearization of nonlinear systems. (MAT242H5 and 252H5 replace MAT258Y5.) [36L, 12T]
Ordinary differential equations of the first and second order, existence and
uniqueness; solutions by series and integrals; linear systems of first order;
linearization of non-linear systems. Applications in life and physical sciences.
(MAT242H5 and 252H5 replace MAT258Y5.) [36L, 12T]
Rationale: This is a small fine-tuning that makes the course consistent with the
analogous course at the St.George campus.
Course #35 MAT242H5 Differential Equations I
Before:
After:
Priority is given to students enrolled in MAT programs.
Rationale: This is a small fine-tuning that makes the course consistent with the
analogous course at the St.George campus.
Course #36 MAT301H5 Groups and Symmetries
Before:
After:
Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics Specialist or
Major programs or in the Information Security Specialist program.
Rationale: We would like to give priority to students who need this course for their program of study.
Course #37 MAT302H5 Introduction to Algebraic Cryptography
Before:
introduce the students to the methods of algebra and number theory used in modern
cryptography. The topics to be covered include: an overview of basic ciphers
such as shift/substitution/permutation ciphers; block ciphers and Feistel ciphers;
The course will
Courses - Description Changes
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RSA and
[36L, 12T]
After:
Factoring; finite fields, elliptic curves, and Discrete Log-Based Systems.
take students on a journey through the methods of algebra and number theory in
cryptography, from Euclid to Zero Knowledge Proofs. Topics include: block ciphers
and the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES); algebraic and number-theoretic
techniques and algorithms in cryptography, including methods for primality
testing and factoring large numbers; encryption and digital signature
systems based on RSA, factoring, elliptic curves and integer lattices; and
zero-knowledge proofs. [36L, 12T]
The course will
Rationale: We would like to give priority to students who need this course for their program of study.
MAT302 is an existing course being taught by a computer science faculty member. Cross-listing that course in computer
science makes it possible for CSC students in all programs (not just the information security program) to take the course
for CSC credit.
Course #38 MAT302H5 Introduction to Algebraic Cryptography
Before:
After:
Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics Specialist or
Major programs or in the Information Security Specialist program.
Rationale: We would like to give priority to students who need this course for their program of study.
MAT302 is an existing course being taught by a computer science faculty member. Cross-listing that course in computer
science makes it possible for CSC students in all programs (not just the information security program) to take the course
for CSC credit.
Course #39 MAT309H5 Introduction to Mathematical Logic
Before:
After:
Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics Specialist or
Major programs.
Rationale: We would like to give priority to students who need this course for their program of study.
Course #40 MAT311H5 Partial Differential Equations
Before:
After:
Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics Specialist or
Major programs.
Rationale: We would like to give priority to students who need this course for their program of study.
Course #41 MAT315H5 Introduction to Number Theory
Before:
After:
Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics Specialist or
Major programs.
Rationale: We would like to give priority to students who need this course for their program of study.
Course #42 MAT332H5 Introduction to Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos
Before:
After:
Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics Specialist or
Major programs.
Rationale: We would like to give priority to students who need this course for their program of study.
Courses - Description Changes
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Course #43 MAT334H5 Complex Variables
Before:
After:
Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics Specialist or
Major programs.
Rationale: We would like to give priority to students who need this course for their program of study.
Course #44 MAT344H5 Introduction to Combinatorics
Before:
After:
Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics Specialist or
Major programs.
Rationale: We would like to give priority to students who need this course for their program of study.
Course #45 MAT368H5 Vector Calculus
Before:
After:
Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics Specialist or
Major programs.
Rationale: We would like to give priority to students who need this course for their program of study.
Course #46 MAT378H5 Introduction to Analysis
Before:
After:
Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics Specialist or
Major programs.
Rationale: We would like to give priority to students who need this course for their program of study.
Course #47 MAT382H5 Mathematics for Teachers
Before:
The course discusses the Mathematics curriculum (K-12) from the following aspects: the strands of the curriculum and their
place in the world of Mathematics, the nature of the proofs, applications of Mathematics, and the connection of
Mathematics to other subjects. Limited
After:
enrolment, priority for CTEP Mathematics students. [36L, 12T]
The course discusses the Mathematics curriculum (K-12) from the following aspects: the strands of the curriculum and their
place in the world of Mathematics, the nature of the proofs, applications of Mathematics, and the connection of
enrolment. The course is open only to students in
the MAT major/specialist programs, with priority to CTEP students. [36L, 12T]
Mathematics to other subjects. Limited
Rationale: This course involves student presentations, and to deliver it properly the size of the class must be limited.
Course #48 MAT388H5 Topics in Mathematics
Before:
After:
Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics Specialist or
Major programs.
Rationale: This course number is usually used for a one-on-one reading course which we would like to reserve to MAT students.
Course #49 MAT392H5 Ideas of Mathematics
Before:
After:
enrolment; priority is given to students enrolled in the MAT Specialist.
Limited enrolment. The course is open only to students in the MAT major/specialist
programs, with priority to students in the specialist program and to CTEP
Limited
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students.
Rationale: This is a writing-intensive course and also involves student presentations. To deliver it properly, the size of the class must
be limited.
Course #50 MAT401H5 Polynomial Equations and Fields
Before:
Offered in alternate years. With instructor's permission, may be taken as a reading course.
After:
Offered in alternate years. With instructor's permission, may be taken as a reading course.
Priority is given to
students enrolled in the Mathematics Specialist or Major programs.
Rationale: We would like to give priority to students who need this course for their program of study.
Course #51 MAT402H5 Classical Geometries
Before:
After:
Offered in alternate years. With instructor's permission, may be taken as a
reading course.
Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics Specialist or Major
programs.
Rationale: A few years ago the course has become mandatory in the MAT major program and since then it has been offered almost
every year.
We would like to give priority to students who need this course for their program of study.
Course #52 MAT405H5 Introduction to Topology
Before:
After:
With instructor's permission, may be taken as a reading course.
Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics Specialist or
Major programs.With instructor's permission, may be taken as a reading course.
Rationale: We would like to give priority to students who need this course for their program of study.
Course #53 MAT406H5 Mathematical Introduction to Game Theory
Before:
With instructor's permission, may be taken as a reading course.
After:
Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics Specialist or
Major programs. With instructor's permission, may be taken as a reading course.
Rationale: We would like to give priority to students who need this course for their program of study.
Course #54 MAT478H5 Topics in Mathematics
Before:
After:
Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics Specialist or
Major programs.
Rationale: This course number is usually used for a one-on-one reading course which we would like to reserve to MAT students.
Course #55 MAT488H5 Topics in Mathematics
Before:
After:
Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics Specialist or
Major programs.
Rationale: This course number is usually used for a one-on-one reading course which we would like to reserve to MAT students.
Course #56 MAT492H5 Senior Thesis
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Before:
After:
Only open to students in the MAT major/specialist programs.
Rationale: This is a one-on-one project that is only offered to MAT students.
Course #57 MAT498H5 Topics in Mathematics
Before:
After:
Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics Specialist or
Major programs.
Rationale: This course number is usually used for a one-on-one reading course which we would like to reserve to MAT students.
Course #58 PHY237H5 The Physics of the Climate System
Before:
Not offered in
After:
Not offered in
2011-12.
2012-13.
Rationale:
Course #59 PHY241H5 Electromagnetism
Before:
Topics in electricity and magnetism, beginning with vector analysis and culminating in Maxwell's equations. Electric fields
and Gauss' law, conductors, capacitors and dielectrics. Magnetic fields, magnetic materials and devices, induction and
Faraday's law. Maxwell's equations and electromagnetic waves are introduced.
[24L,
After:
12T]
Topics in electricity and magnetism, beginning with vector analysis and culminating in Maxwell's equations. Electric fields
and Gauss' law, conductors, capacitors and dielectrics. Magnetic fields, magnetic materials and devices, induction and
Faraday's law. Maxwell's equations and electromagnetic waves are introduced.
[24L,
16P, 8T]
Rationale: (1) All the physics second-year courses include a lab component except PHY241H5. (2) The theoretical material discussed
in this course needs an experimental/application component to strengthen the students’ understanding of the subjects
involved in the lectures.
Course #60 PHY347H5 Optics
Before:
A comprehensive introduction to the physics of light. Topics may vary but will include:
After:
A comprehensive introduction to the physics of light. Topics may vary but will include: electromagnetic waves and
geometrical optics,
aberration theory, optical instruments, electromagnetic waves and light propagation,
the diffraction and the interference of light, the basis of coherence theory, Fourier optics,
polarization and birefringence. Applications include the optics of the eye, lasers, fiber
optics, optical displays and nonlinear optical devices. [24L, 16P, 8T]
propagation of light, basic coherence concepts and the interference of light,
Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction, matrix methods in paraxial optics, Fresnel
equations, polarization and birefringence. Technical applications will include lasers, optical
fibers and optical detectors and displays. [24L, 16P, 8T]
Rationale: The mathematical methods covered in PHY325 will allow more advanced material to be covered in PHY347, and the
course description has been revised to reflect this.
Course #61 PHY451H5 Classical Electrodynamics
Before:
An overview of electromagnetism leading to the study of radiation.
A review of electrostatics, magnetostatics, and Maxwell's equations is followed by a discussion of propagating,
non-propogating and guided waves; interactions with dielectric boundaries; multipole radiation fields, and simple
models of optical dispersion. [24L, 12T]
After:
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An overview of electromagnetism leading to the study of radiation.
A review of electrostatics, magnetostatics, and Maxwell's equations is followed by a discussion of propagating,
non-propagating and guided waves; interactions with dielectric boundaries; multipole radiation fields, and simple
models of optical dispersion. [24L, 12T]
Rationale: The only difference is a typo in the second sentence, “propogating” should be “propagating".
Course #62 PSY220H5 Introduction to Social Psychology
Before:
A survey of classic and contemporary research in social psychology. Topics include attitudes and social cognition,
After:
A survey of classic and contemporary research in social psychology. Topics include attitudes and social cognition,
interpersonal relations, group processes, and
interpersonal relations, group processes, and
ethnic attitudes. [36L]
culture. [36L]
Rationale: This small modification results in a description that more accurately describes the course's content, which is broader than
what is conveyed in the current description. This will help students understand how the course fits in the Adjustment and
Well being Stream of courses.
Course #63 PSY316H5 Infant Perception and Cognition
Before:
After:
examines human perceptual development during the first 2-3 years of life. Vision and
audition are emphasized. Some topics are: pattern and colour vision, depth
perception, infant speech perception. [36L]
This course focuses primarily on human perceptual and cognitive development during the first 2
years of life. A heavy emphasis is placed on experimental work with normally
developing infants. Topics include but are not limited to face recognition,
colour and depth perception, auditory localization, object categorization, speech and
language processing, learning and memory, intelligence and social
influences on development. [36L]
This course
Rationale: This change reflects shifting research interests in the field of developmental psychology. Very few developmental
psychologists study perception on its own, and indeed we have not been able to find any other universities that are
currently offering a course on perceptual development at the undergraduate level. Unsurprising, there are also no recent
textbooks suitable for undergraduates published on this relatively narrow topic. This is probably because most
contemporary infant researchers study both perception and cognition together. Moreover, there is a growing body of
literature demonstrating how the development of infant cognition is closely linked to the social environment of the infant.
Thus, it is difficult to discuss recent findings in the area of perception without discussing cognition and the environmental
social factors experienced by the infant. By broadening the focus of this course, we hope to better provide the students
with a more up to date perspective on the field of infant research.
Course #64 PSY343H5 Theories of Psychotherapy
Before:
The extension of major theories of personality to treatment (therapy) for personality disorders, and research growing out of
the theories. [36L]
After:
The extension of major theories of personality to treatment (therapy) for personality
and research
and behavioural disorders,
supporting and/or growing out of the theories. [36L]
Rationale: This small modification results in a description that more accurately describes the course's content, which is broader than
what is conveyed in the current description. This will help students understand how the course fits into the adjustment and
well being stream of courses.
Course #65 STA302H5 Regression Analysis
Before:
Analysis of the multiple regression model by least squares; statistical properties of the least square analysis, including
estimation of error; residual and regression sums of squares; distribution theory under normality of the observations;
confidence regions and intervals; tests for normality; variance stabilizing transformations, multicolinearity, variable search
methods. [36L, 12T]
After:
(Formerly STA331H5) Analysis of the multiple regression model by least squares; statistical properties of the
least square analysis, including estimation of error; residual and regression sums of squares; distribution theory under
normality of the observations; confidence regions and intervals; tests for normality; variance stabilizing transformations,
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multicolinearity, variable search methods. [36L, 12T]
Rationale: Course renumbered.
Course #66 STA305H5 Experimental Design
Before:
This course covers topics in the design and analysis of experiments. The topics covered include analysis of variance,
randomization, confounding, block designs, factorial designs, orthogonal polynomials and response surface methods.
Applications include agricultural experiments, laboratory experiments, and industrial experiments, including quality control
techniques. [36L, 12T]
After:
(Formerly STA332H5)This course covers topics in the design and analysis of experiments. The topics
covered include analysis of variance, randomization, confounding, block designs, factorial designs, orthogonal polynomials
and response surface methods. Applications include agricultural experiments, laboratory experiments, and industrial
experiments, including quality control techniques. [36L, 12T]
Rationale: Course renumbered.
Course #67 STA441H5 Methods of Applied Statistics
Before:
Advanced topics in statistics and data analysis with emphasis on applications. Diagnostics and residuals in linear models,
introductions to generalized linear models, graphical methods. Additional topics such as random effects models, split plot
designs, smoothing and density estimation, analysis of censored data, introduced as needed in the context of case studies.
[36L, 12T]
After:
(Formerly STA442H5) Advanced topics in statistics and data analysis with emphasis on applications.
Diagnostics and residuals in linear models, introductions to generalized linear models, graphical methods. Additional topics
such as random effects models, split plot designs, smoothing and density estimation, analysis of censored data, introduced
as needed in the context of case studies. [36L, 12T]
Rationale: Course renumbered.
Courses - Description Changes
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Changes in Course Name
Course #1 ANT200H5 Prehistoric Archaeology
Before:
After:
World Archaeology and Prehistory
Prehistoric Archaeology
Rationale: Y course divided into 2 half courses. ANT200Y5 to be changed to ANT200H5, with new title and description. Change from
tutorials to practicals: Due to lack of sufficient lab space, first and second year courses in biological anthropology and
archaeology have not been able to conduct proper lab practicals. However, wit the new teaching labs planned for next
year, and the shift of research materials to the new HSC building, the opening of space in North has allowed us to make
this change already in the way the courses are taught, starting 2011 or in some with 2010.
Y course divided into 2 half courses. ANT200Y5 to be changed to ANT200H5, with new title and description.
Course #2 ANT407H5 Statistics and Archaeological Analyses to Quantitative Methods in Biological
Anthropology and Archaeology
Before:
Statistics and Archaeological Analyses
After:
Statistics and Archaeological Analyses
to Quantitative Methods in Biological Anthropology
and Archaeology
Rationale: Archaeological Analyses is too similar to ANT312 course title. Since ANT312 is a pre-req for ANT407, a different title -more
in line with comparable upper level undergraduate offerings at other institutions is necessary.
Course #3 GGR217H5 Fundamentals of Hydrology
Before:
After:
Rationale:
The Global Water Cycle
Fundamentals of Hydrology
The change in course title and description reflects the change in faculty appointment to this course and the
hydrology stream in the Department of Geography. It also better illustrates that this is an introductory course in
hydrology meant to be taking in sequence with upper level hydrology-stream courses, as well as for other
science majors to develop an appreciation of the hydrosphere.
Course #4 GGR309H5 Wetland Ecosystems
Before:
After:
Wetlands: Science, Management and Preservation
Wetland Ecosystems
Rationale: The change in course title and minor change to the course description better reflects the content of the course. The
management and preservation topics are not addressed in great enough depth to warrant inclusion in the title. This is a
science course exploring wetland ecosystems; this is what the course should be called. The addition of 24 practical hours
(from 12 to 36) reflects the need for students to become engaged with wetlands beyond the lectures. Students will make
several trips to local wetlands and participate in laboratories, increasing their knowledge breadth. This course has been
operated for several years in succession, with increasing enrollments. It no longer needs to be alternated between years.
Course #5 HSC401H5 Health and Science Communication Design
Before:
Web-Based Health and Science Communication Design
After:
Health and Science Communication Design
Rationale:
Change in course name and description more accurately reflects the kind of work students do in the course,
which now includes, for examples, the design of apps rather than simply web-based media.
Course #6 PSY316H5 Infant Perception and Cognition
Before:
After:
Perceptual Development
Infant Perception and Cognition
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Rationale:
Course #7 PSY353H5 Developmental Social Neuroscience
Before:
After:
Psychobiology of Social Behaviour
Developmental Social Neuroscience
Developmental
Rationale: While it can be argued that Psychobiology and Neuroscience and not synonyms, many people now use them
interchangeably. Neuroscience has become the more common way to refer to the field at present and social neuroscience
in particular is a a growing specialization and buzz word.
Changes in Course Name
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Courses - Other Changes
Course #1 ANT200H5 Prehistoric Archaeology
Before:
After:
ANT(101H5, 102H5) Course Exclusion:
Prerequisite: ANT101H5
Course Exclusion: ANT200Y5
Prerequisite:
Rationale: Y course divided into 2 half courses. ANT200Y5 to be changed to ANT200H5, with new title and description. Change from
tutorials to practicals: Due to lack of sufficient lab space, first and second year courses in biological anthropology and
archaeology have not been able to conduct proper lab practicals. However, wit the new teaching labs planned for next
year, and the shift of research materials to the new HSC building, the opening of space in North has allowed us to make
this change already in the way the courses are taught, starting 2011 or in some with 2010.
To better reflect the course content of a Y course divided into 2 half courses.
Course #2 ANT308H5 Case Studies in Archaeological Botany and Zoology
Before:
Prerequisite:
After:
Prerequisite:
ANT200Y5
ANT(200H5, 201H5)/200Y5
Rationale: Prerequisite update.
Course #3 ANT309H5 Southeast Asian Archaeology
Before:
Prerequisite:
After:
Prerequisite:
ANT200Y5
ANT(200H5, 201H5)/200Y5
Rationale: Prerequisite update.
Course #4 ANT312H5 Archaeological Analysis
Before:
Prerequisite:
After:
Prerequisite:
ANT200Y5
ANT(200H5, 201H5)/200Y5
Rationale: Prerequisite update.
Course #5 ANT313H5 China, Korea and Japan in Prehistory
Before:
Prerequisite:
After:
Prerequisite:
ANT200Y5
ANT(200H5, 201H5)/200Y5
Rationale: Prerequisite update.
Course #6 ANT314H5 Archaeological Theory
Before:
Prerequisite:
After:
Prerequisite:
ANT200Y5
ANT(200H5, 201H5)/200Y5
Rationale: Prerequisite update.
Course #7 ANT317H5 Archaeology of Eastern North America
Before:
Prerequisite:
After:
Prerequisite:
ANT200Y5
ANT(200H5, 201H5)/200Y5
Rationale: Prerequisite update.
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Course #8 ANT318H5 Archaeological Fieldwork
Before:
Prerequisite:
After:
Prerequisite:
ANT200Y5
ANT(200H5, 201H5)/200Y5
Rationale: Prerequisite update.
Course #9 ANT320H5 Archaeological Approaches to Technology
Before:
After:
ANT200Y5 Recommended Preparation: (ANT204H5, 207H5)/204Y5
Prerequisite: ANT(200H5, 201H5)/200Y5
Recommended Preparation: ANT(204H5, 207H5)/204Y5
Prerequisite:
Rationale: Prerequisite update.
Course #10 ANT327H5 Agricultural Origins: The Second Revolution
Before:
Prerequisite:
After:
Prerequisite:
ANT200Y5
ANT(200H5, 201H5)/200Y5
Rationale: Prerequisite update.
Course #11 ANT407H5 Statistics and Archaeological Analyses to Quantitative Methods in Biological
Anthropology and Archaeology
Before:
Prerequisite:
After:
Prerequisite:
ANT200Y5
ANT (200H5, 201H5)/200Y5, ANT312H5
Rationale: Prerequisite update.
Course #12 ANT414H5 People and Plants in Prehistory
Before:
Prerequisite:
After:
Prerequisite:
ANT200Y5, 312H5/318H5 or P.I.
ANT(200H5, 201H5)/200Y5, 312H5/318H5 or P.I.
Rationale: Prerequisite update.
Course #13 ANT415H5 Faunal Archaeo-Osteology
Before:
Prerequisite:
After:
Prerequisite:
ANT200Y5, 306H5/308H5/312H5/318H5.
ANT(200H5, 201H5)/200Y5, 306H5/308H5/312H5/318H5.
Rationale: Prerequisite update.
Course #14 BIO207H5 Introductory Genetics
Before:
Prerequisite: BIO152H5,
After:
Prerequisite: BIO152H5, 206H5
153H5, 206H5 Corequisite:
Corequisite: BIO153H5
Rationale: The content of BIO153H will be helpful, but does not relate as directly to this course as BIO152H does. In most cases,
students will still not be able to take this course until their second year because of the BIO206H pre-req; however, moving
BIO153H to a co-req would allow some students, such as transfer students, to take the two courses at the same time and
not delay them from moving through their program.
Course #15 BIO330H5 Plant Ecology
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Before:
After:
BIO205H5 Corequisite: (Recommended): BIO313H5
Prerequisite: BIO204H5, 205H5
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:
Rationale: Currently, a review of plant physiology is done at the beginning of this course. Adding BIO204H as a pre-req will allow the
instructor to remove this part of the course, making room for the instructor to explore current course topics in more depth.
This will contribute to better trained ecology students, benefiting our Ecology and Evolution Specialist program.
Course #16 BIO356H5 Major Features of Vertebrate Evolution
Before:
Prerequisite:
After:
Prerequisite:
BIO354H5 Corequisite: Recommended Preparation:
Corequisite: BIO210Y5
Recommended Preparation: BIO360H5/ STA220H5/ PSY201H5
Rationale: To reflect these changes, the pre-requisites and co-requisites for this course have been amended accordingly.
Course #17 BIO374H5 Biotechnology and Society
Before:
Prerequisite:
After:
Prerequisite:
BIO206H5, CHM140Y5
BIO215H5
Rationale: Change in pre-requisite reflects feedback from students - those that had already completed BIO215H5 before taking this
course was much more comfortable with the material. This change will help to ensure students in BIO374H5 have the
greatest chance of success.
Course #18 BIO400Y5 Biology Internship
Before:
Course Exclusion:
After:
Course Exclusion:
ENV400Y5
ENV400Y5; BIO481Y5; JCB487Y5
Rationale: Due to constraints on resources, BIO400Y and BIO481Y/ JCB487Y5 can only offer opportunities to a limited number of
students. In an effort to ensure that as many students as possible are able to take advantage of these unique
opportunities, we ask that students participate in one of these courses, but not more. This is an extension of our 2.0 credit
max. rule for ROP and research courses and has been in practice by the Internship Office for many years already.
Course #19 BIO476H5 Molecular Basis of Disease
Before:
After:
BIO310H5, 315H5, 325H5 Recommended Preparation: BIO341H5, 372H5
Prerequisite: BIO304H5, 315H5
Recommended Preparation: BIO310H5, 341H5, 372H5
Prerequisite:
Rationale: 1. Addition of BIO304H - BIO304H5 is our Fall animal physiology course. As BIO476H is offered in the Spring, changing
the physiology pre-req from BIO310H to BIO304H allows students to take BIO304H and BIO476H in the same academic
year.
2. Removal of BIO325H5 - BIO325H5 was a pre-requisite for one specific module in the course. Next year, this module will
be removed so the pre-req is no longer needed. They will have sufficient physio background with BIO304H as a pre-req.
Course #20 BIO477H5 Molecular Biology of Gene Expression and Cancer
Before:
Prerequisite:
BIO370Y5; BIO372H5, P.I. Recommended Preparation: BIO315H5; CHM362H5,
371H5
After:
BIO370Y5/ BIO372H5, P.I.
Recommended Preparation: BIO314H5, 315H5
Prerequisite:
Rationale: 1. The changes in the pre-requisites reflect what has become a common exception that has been made in past years. It will
also make it easier for the students in the Bioinformatics Specialist to the take the course as they will not have the
BIO370Y pre-requisite. We are still retaining “permission of instructor” in order to remove students to make space for
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students in Specialist programs (i.e. Molecular Biology, Bioinformatics, and Biotechnology) who need the course to
graduate.
2. The changes in the recommended preparation courses include the addition of 314H (Laboratory in Cell and Molecular
Biology) which is a relevant course that has a large molecular biology content. It also includes the removal of the
CHM362H and CHM371H Biochemistry courses that while relevant, are not particularly needed to prepare for BIO477H.
Course #21 BIO481Y5 Biology Research Project
Before:
Course Exclusion:
After:
Course Exclusion:
BIO400Y5, JCB487Y5
Rationale: Due to constraints on resources, BIO400Y and BIO481Y/ JCB487Y5 can only offer opportunities to a limited number of
students. In an effort to ensure that as many students as possible are able to take advantage of these unique
opportunities, we ask that students participate in one of these courses, but not more. This is an extension of our 2.0 credit
max. rule for ROP and research courses and has been in practice by the Internship Office for many years already.
Course #22 CBJ481Y5 Independent Project in Bioinformatics
Before:
Corequisite:
After:
Corequisite: BIO477H5
CSC290H5, BIO477H5
Rationale: BIO477 already satisfies the requirement.
Course #23 CHM211H5 Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry
Before:
After:
A mark of 60% or higher in CHM140Y5/(110H5,120H5)
Prerequisite: MAT134Y5/135Y5/137Y5; CHM140Y5(minimum grade of 60%)/(110H5,120H5;
minimum grade of 60% in CHM120H5)
Prerequisite: MAT134Y5/135Y5/137Y5;
Rationale: Pre-requisite: Many students struggle with the transition from high school to university. In order to allow them more time to
adjust to university life before assessing their eligibility for second year courses, we will consider their mark only from the
second first year CHM course, CHM120, rather than both CHM110 and CHM120. We have also rephrased the minimum
grade statement to match the other courses and program entries.
Course #24 CHM231H5 Inorganic Chemistry I
Before:
After:
A mark of 60% or higher in CHM140Y5/(110H5,120H5)
Prerequisite: MAT134Y5/135Y5/137Y5; CHM140Y5(minimum grade of 60%)/(110H5,120H5;
minimum grade of 60% in CHM120H5)
Prerequisite: MAT134Y5/135Y5/137Y5;
Rationale: Pre-requisite: Many students struggle with the transition from high school to university. In order to allow them more time to
adjust to university life before assessing their eligibility for second year courses, we will consider their mark only from the
second first year CHM course, CHM120, rather than both CHM110 and CHM120. We have also rephrased the minimum
grade statement to match the other courses and program entries.
Course #25 CHM242H5 Introductory Organic Chemistry I
Before:
After:
A mark of 60% or higher in CHM140Y5/(110H5,120H5)
Prerequisite: CHM140Y5(minimum grade of 60%)/(110H5,120H5; minimum grade of
60% in CHM120H5)
Prerequisite:
Rationale: Pre-requisite: Many students struggle with the transition from high school to university. In order to allow them more time to
adjust to university life before assessing their eligibility for second year courses, we will consider their mark only from the
second first year CHM course, CHM120, rather than both CHM110 and CHM120. We have also rephrased the minimum
grade statement to match the other courses and program entries.
Course #26 CHM331H5 Inorganic Chemistry II: Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
Before:
Prerequisite:
CHM231H5 Corequisite:
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After:
CHM231H5, 242H5
Corequisite: CHM243H5
Prerequisite:
Rationale: Pre-requisite: CHM242H5 (added) - Co-requisite: CHM243H5 (added): The topics covered in the course require some
introductory background in organic chemistry, and thus we want to add this prerequisite so that students are not
disadvantaged by a lack of an organic chemistry background. CHM243, the second of the two second year organic
chemistry courses, can be taken in parallel with this course, and thus has been added as a corequisite rather than a
prerequisite.
Course #27 CHM333H5 Bioinorganic Chemistry
Before:
After:
CHM231H5 Corequisite:
Prerequisite: CHM231H5, 242H5
Corequisite: CHM243H5
Prerequisite:
Rationale: Pre-requisite: CHM242H5 (added) - Co-requisite: CHM243H5 (added): The topics covered in the course require some
introductory background in organic chemistry, and thus we want to add this prerequisite so that students are not
disadvantaged by a lack of an organic chemistry background. CHM243, the second of the two second year organic
chemistry courses, can be taken in parallel with this course, and thus has been added as a corequisite rather than a
prerequisite.
Course #28 CSC108H5 Introduction to Computer Programming
Before:
Course Exclusion:
After:
Course Exclusion:
CSC148H5, 150H1
CSC120H1,148H5, 150H1
Rationale: CSC120H1 was introduced recently, and it was added to the exclusion list of CSC108H1. This change brings CSC108H5
into agreement with the corresponding StG course.
Course #29 CSC321H5 Introduction to Neural Networks and Machine Learning
Before:
Prerequisite:
After:
Prerequisite:
CSC207H5/270H5, 290H5; MAT223H5/248Y5; STA257H5
CSC148H5, 290H5; MAT134Y5/135Y5/137Y5, 223H5; STA257H5
Rationale: The prerequisites have been modified to remove CSC207 (replaced by CSC148). The instructor believes that the
languageused in the course (MATLAB) can be learned with Python experience and that larger-scale software design
experience is not required.
Course #30 CSC338H5 Numerical Methods
Before:
After:
CSC207H5/270H5, 290H5; (MAT134Y5/135Y5/137Y5)/(MAT133Y5,
233H5), MAT223H5.
Prerequisite: CSC148H5, 290H5/MAT202H5; MAT134Y5/135Y5/137Y5, 223H5
Prerequisite:
Rationale: The instructor has also requested replacement of the 207 prereq for 148 to match the prerequisites of the equivalent
downtown course. Since the course work iscompleted in Matlab rather than Java, experience with a scripting language
(like the one taught in CSC108 and 148) is sufficient. We are also introducing an alternate writing requirement to make the
course more accessible students in mathematics.
Course #31 ECO227Y5 Quantitative Methods in Economics
Before:
Prerequisite: ECO100Y5(70%); MAT133Y5
After:
Prerequisite: ECO100Y5(70%); MAT133Y5
(63%)/134Y5/135Y5(60%)/137Y5(55%)
(80%)/134Y5/135Y5(63%)/137Y5(60%)
Rationale: Adjusted required MAT marks in advanced level ECO courses 206Y5, 208Y5 and 227Y5 to ensure success in Specialist
programs and maintain consistency.
Course #32 ERS319H5 Earth Resources
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Before:
Prerequisite:
After:
Prerequisite:
ERS202H5/203H5
ERS201H5
Rationale: Change course hours from [24L, 36P] to [24L, 48P] The extra hours reflect field-work already being done; this is
instructor-led and outdoors, so it does not increase TA hours or staff hours, and does not require any room booking.
Pre-requisite: Both ERS202 (Dynamic Earth) and ERS203 (Rock Forming Processes) require ERS201 (Earth Materials) as
a prereq, but the instructor of ERS202 does not always enforce the requirement. This can allow students to enrol in
ERS319 without the necessary background in rocks and minerals from ERS201, if they come by way of ERS202.
Course #33 FSC300H5 Forensic Identification
Before:
Prerequisite: FSC239Y5;
After:
Prerequisite: FSC239Y5;
CHM140Y5
FSC271H5
Rationale: FSC300H5 is a course requirement for ALL FSC Programs including the FSC ANT and FSC PSY Specialist. Due to
curriculum changes made last year, CHM140Y5/(CHM 110H5, 120H5), which has always been required by ALL FSC
Programs is no longer a required course for the FSC ANT and FSC PSY Specialist Programs. Therefore, as our Programs
currently require completion of a high number of credits (Specialist Programs: 16 credits; Major: 9 credits) we are replacing
one of the current prerequisites, CHM140Y5/(CHM 110H5, 120H5) with FSC271H5 –Ethics and Professionalism in
Forensic Science, a course currently required in ALL other FSC Programs. FSC271H5 is a more discipline appropriate
prerequisite and complements the current listed prerequisite of FSC239Y -Intro to Forensic Science and it also alleviates
the need to add an additional (1.0) full credit requirement to the FSC ANT & FSC PSY Specialists programs.
Course #34 FSC481Y5 Internship in Forensic Science
Before:
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Forensic Science Specialist or Major and permission of instructor.
After:
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Forensic Science Specialist or Major
; STA220H5, STA221H5 / BIO360H5,
BIO361H5 / PSY201, PSY202H5 and permission of instructor.
Rationale: We are adding the statistics courses required in all our FSC Programs as prerequisites to FSC481Y5Y to ensure students
enrolling into the course have the necessary statistics background prior to beginning this research course, enhancing the
overall student learning experience.
Course #35 GGR315H5 Physical Hydrology
Before:
Prerequisite:
After:
Prerequisite:
GGR214H5/217H5/227H5/P.I.
GGR214H5/217H5
Rationale: The minor change to the course description reflects the advanced nature of the subject matter.
The addition of 24 practical hours (from 12 to 36) reflects the need for students to become engaged with field and lab
research in hydrology. Students will conduct weekly assignments outdoors and in the lab setting, in addition to a term-long
field monitoring project all of which will significantly increasing their connection to the subject matter.
The removal of GGR227H5 from the list of prerequisites is necessary to ensure students have the required prior
knowledge for the course. Either 214 or 217 provides the background.
This course has been operated for several years in succession, with increasing enrollments. It no longer needs to be
alternated between years. Course #36 GGR407H5 Ecohydrology
Before:
After:
GGR315H5/376H5/P.I.
Prerequisite: GGR315H5 or GGR217H5 and one of
GGR305H5/307H5/309H5/315H5/BIO311H5/BIO330H5
Prerequisite:
Rationale: The change in course description better reflects to students what is meant by ecohydrology. The previous description
referred to watershed water and solute cycling, a different area in the advanced treatment of hydrology. The addition of 36
practical hours will allow students to engage in group and individual research projects (including the collection of data) as
part of the course requirements. The change from 24 lecture hours to 24 seminar hours reflects how the course operates.
The addition of several alternative prerequisites is intended to broaden the pool of students eligible for this course. The
change in content allows for greater exploration of ecological interactions with hydrology. Students without 315, but an
introduction to hydrology (217) and additional ecological and soil science courses would do well.
Course #37 HSC200H5 Imaging Technologies for Scientific Visual Communication
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Before:
Course Exclusion:
After:
Course Exclusion:
HSC302H5
Rationale: HSC302H5 was previously the 'introductory' HSC course for the BMC minor. Last year, the program introduced HSC200H5
which will now serve as our basic introductory course to digital technology and will be a pre-requisite for the majority of the
senior BMC courses. As HSC200H5 will contain some of the content that used to be in HSC302H5, students that have
already completed it should not take HSC200H5. This will only effect the current cohort of students as those that are
entering the BMC minor program as of last year must take HSC200H5 before taking 300-level HSC courses.
Course #38 HSC300H5 Written Communication for Health Care
Before:
Prerequisite: BIO152H5
After:
Prerequisite: BIO152H5
and WRI203H5/ENG205H5
Rationale: WRI203H5 was previously a pre-requisite for this course to ensure that science students had some writing experience
before entering this course. With the course changes in BIO152H5 (i.e. the introduction of the literacy project), will provide
them with the needed writing instruction for this course.
Course #39 HSC301H5 Data and Information Visualization
Before:
Prerequisite:
After:
Prerequisite:
CCT101H5/BIO152H5/ANT101H5
HSC200H5
Rationale: HSC200H5 will be our new introductory course to digital technology. Our 300-level HSC courses in this area will build
directly from this introductory course. Removing the previous pre-requisites and adding HSC200H5 will ensure that all
students entering the 300-level HSC courses have the same background and are able to move on to more advanced
projects.
Course #40 HSC302H5 Biocommunication Visualization
Before:
Prerequisite:
After:
Prerequisite:
BIO204H5/BIO206H5/BIO210H5/BIO210Y5/ANT203Y5
HSC200H5
Rationale: HSC200H5 will be our new introductory course to digital technology. Our 300-level HSC courses in this area will build
directly from this introductory course. Removing the previous pre-requisites and adding HSC200H5 will ensure that all
students entering the 300-level HSC courses have the same background and are able to move on to more advanced
projects.
Course #41 HSC401H5 Health and Science Communication Design
Before:
Prerequisite:
After:
Prerequisite:
CCT260H5/BIO152H5/ANT101H5
HSC200H5
Rationale: HSC200H5 will be our new introductory course to digital technology. Our 300/400-level HSC courses in this area will build
directly from this introductory course. Removing the previous pre-requisites and adding HSC200H5 will ensure that all
students entering the 300/400-level HSC courses have the same background and are able to move on to more advanced
projects.
Course #42 JCP221H5 Thermodynamics and Kinetics
Before:
After:
CHM140Y5/(110H5,120H5) (minimum
60%)/PHY135Y5/(136H5,137H5) (minimum 60%)
Prerequisite: MAT134Y5/135Y5/137Y5; CHM140Y5(minimum grade of 60%)/(110H5,120H5;
minimum grade of 60% in CHM120H5)/PHY135Y5/(136H5,137H5) (minimum 60%)
Prerequisite: MAT134Y5/135Y5/137Y5;
Rationale: Pre-requisite: Many students struggle with the transition from high school to university. In order to allow them more time to
adjust to university life before assessing their eligibility for second year courses, we will consider their mark only from the
second first year CHM course, CHM120, rather than both CHM110 and CHM120.
Course #43 MAT212H5 Modeling with Differential Equations in Life Sciences and Medicine
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Before:
Corequisite:
After:
Corequisite:
Rationale:
Multivariable calculus is important background for differential equations; it is required as a corequisite or
prerequisite in other flavours of differential equations course in all campuses; it is important in this course too.
MAT223H5
MAT223H5, 232H5
Course #44 MAT232H5 Calculus of Several Variables
Before:
Corequisite:
After:
Corequisite:
MAT223H5
Rationale: Linear algebra is necessary to understand multivariable calculus. Within MAT232 there is not enough time to properly
include enough of this required background.
Course #45 MAT233H5 Calculus of Several Variables
Before:
Prerequisite: MAT134Y5/135Y5/137Y5 or
After:
Prerequisite: MAT134Y5/135Y5/137Y5 or
80% in MAT133Y5 Corequisite:
75% in MAT133Y5
Corequisite: MAT223H5
Rationale: This is a “bridging course” that allows students who took Calculus for Commerce, MAT133, to continue to higher level
courses in MAT and STA.
Linear algebra is necessary to understand multivariable calculus. Within MAT233 there is not enough time to properly
include enough of this required background.
In practice we have already been allowing students who got a mark of 75% on MAT133. This requirement suffices for
succeeding in MAT233.
Course #46 MAT302H5 Introduction to Algebraic Cryptography
Before:
Course Exclusion:
After:
Course Exclusion:
CSC322H5
Rationale: We would like to give priority to students who need this course for their program of study.
MAT302 is an existing course being taught by a computer science faculty member. Cross-listing that course in computer
science makes it possible for CSC students in all programs (not just the information security program) to take the course
for CSC credit.
Course #47 MAT368H5 Vector Calculus
Before:
Prerequisite: MAT102H5, 232H5/233H5
After:
Prerequisite: MAT102H5,
223H5, 232H5/233H5
Rationale: We would like to give priority to students who need this course for their program of study.
Linear algebra is necessary to understand multivariable calculus. Within MAT368 there is not enough time to properly
include enough of this required background.
Course #48 MAT378H5 Introduction to Analysis
Before:
Prerequisite: MAT102H5, (223H5, 224H5)/248Y5,
After:
Prerequisite: MAT102H5, (223H5, 224H5)/248Y5,
212H5/242H5/258Y5
212H5/242H5/258Y5, 232H5
Rationale: We would like to give priority to students who need this course for their program of study.
MAT232 was a “hidden prerequisite” and is being made explicit.
Course #49 MAT405H5 Introduction to Topology
Before:
Prerequisite: MAT102H5, 224H5,
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232H5/233H5, 301H5
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After:
232H5/233H5 and at least one MAT half-course at the
300+ level with a mark of at least 65%.
Prerequisite: MAT102H5, 224H5,
Rationale: We would like to give priority to students who need this course for their program of study.
The specific content of MAT301 is not necessary for MAT405. But
MAT405 requires high mathematical maturity, which would can obtained through any of our 300 level courses.
Course #50 PHY325H5 Mathematical Physics
Before:
Prerequisite: PHY241H5, 242H5,
After:
Prerequisite: PHY241H5, 242H5,
245H5, JCP221H5
245H5
Rationale: The material covered in the three second year PHY courses is specifically used as a source of example topics in PHY325,
whereas the material in JCP221 is not used directly.
Course #51 PHY347H5 Optics
Before:
Prerequisite: PHY241H5,
After:
Prerequisite: PHY241H5,
245H5
245H5, 325H5
Rationale: Pre-requisite: A new Mathematical Physics course (PHY325H5) is now being offered (as of fall 2011), and this should be a
prerequisite for this course on optics. The mathematical methods covered in PHY325 will allow more advanced material to
be covered in PHY347, and the course description has been revised to reflect this.
Course #52 PSY316H5 Infant Perception and Cognition
Before:
Prerequisite: PSY201H5/equivalent,
After:
Prerequisite: PSY201H5/equivalent,
210H5/213H5, 280H5
210H5/270H5/280H5
Rationale: This change reflects shifting research interests in the field of developmental psychology. Very few developmental
psychologists study perception on its own, and indeed we have not been able to find any other universities that are
currently offering a course on perceptual development at the undergraduate level. Unsurprising, there are also no recent
textbooks suitable for undergraduates published on this relatively narrow topic. This is probably because most
contemporary infant researchers study both perception and cognition together. Moreover, there is a growing body of
literature demonstrating how the development of infant cognition is closely linked to the social environment of the infant.
Thus, it is difficult to discuss recent findings in the area of perception without discussing cognition and the environmental
social factors experienced by the infant. By broadening the focus of this course, we hope to better provide the students
with a more up to date perspective on the field of infant research.
Course #53 SOC350H5 Quantitative Analysis I
Before:
Prerequisite:
After:
Prerequisite:
SOC100H5/101Y5, 200Y/(SOC221H5, 222H5)
SOC100H5, 221H5, 222H5
Rationale: We made the change from Y to H courses in 2006 and no longer need the reference to Y courses on the books.
Course #54 STA107H5 An Introduction to Probability and Modelling
Before:
Course Exclusion:
After:
Course Exclusion:
STA257H5
STA257H5; ECO227Y5
Rationale: ECO227Y5 is accepted as equivalent to STA257H5+STA258H5, and STA257H5 is exclusion to STA107H5
Course #55 STA431H5 Structural Equation Models
Before:
Prerequisite:
After:
Prerequisite:
STA258H5/ECO327Y5/STA302H1/STA302H5
STA258H5
Rationale:
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STA258H is a prerequisite for STA302H and STA331H. STA257H + STA258H = ECO227Y which is prerequisite for
ECO327Y , but content of the 300 level courses in not necessary prerequisite material for STA431H; this course is offered
in alternate years.
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